Cases reported "Neck Injuries"

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11/84. Penetrating neck trauma: hidden injuries-oesophagospinal traumatic fistula.

    Injuries to the eosophagus are notoriously difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. patients with such injuries usually will not have pre-operative signs and symptoms to suggest the presence of this type of injury. These injuries require a high index of suspicion, appreciation of the presence of injuries to adjacent structures, and an understanding that the clinical and radiological findings may evolve over a period of time. We describe a child with a rare presentation of an acute traumatic esophageal spinal fistula due to a bullet wound. This complicated injury required a variety of diagnostic modalities, including contrast radiography, multiple computerised tomography (CT) scans and operative assessments to make the definitive diagnosis.
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keywords = wound
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12/84. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thyrocervical trunk.

    A case of a pseudoaneurysm of the thyrocervical trunk after a pocketknife stab wound to zone I of the neck is reported. The patient was evaluated and treated in an emergency department with irrigation of the wound, bandage, and oral antibiotics. A large pseudoaneurysm slowly developed over the next 2 months. When the patient arrived at our hospital, he was immediately admitted and arteriograms were obtained. Arteriograms revealed an active leak of blood into a pseudoaneurysm from the thyrocervical trunk. Surgical treatment consisted of proximal and distal ligation of the thyrocervical trunk. This is the first case of a pseudoaneurysm developing only from the thyrocervical trunk due to a stab wound to zone I of the neck. This case and its complication serve to illustrate and emphasize the rationale for routinely imaging the great vessels after all penetrating trauma to zone I of the neck.
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ranking = 3
keywords = wound
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13/84. Incomplete decapitation of a motorcyclist from hyperextension by inertia: a case report.

    This is a rare case involving a motorcyclist. A 57 year old motorcycle rider wearing a full face type helmet, suffered incomplete decapitation. The autopsy findings revealed a wide lacerated wound accompanied by extension marks in the front neck, atlanto-occipital dislocation and complete transection of the brainstem. According to the police traffic report, the man's head was stationary at the moment of impact and the remainder of the body continued in a backward motion. We concluded that the inertia of the torso caused hyperextension of the neck and subsequent incomplete decapitation.
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keywords = wound
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14/84. pneumocephalus secondary to a neck stab wound without neurologic injury in a 13-year-old girl.

    pneumocephalus is usually caused by injury that damages the brain meninges and thus allows air to enter the intracranial cavity. Our intention was to establish the importance of considering a stab wound in the neck as a possible cause of traumatic pneumocephalus. The paper presents the case of a 13-year-old girl who was accidentally stabbed in the neck with a kitchen knife by her brother. She had no neurological deficit but had developed headaches. An examination showed cerebrospinal fluid leaking from the neck wound and a CT scan revealed the pneumocephalus. Following surgical treatment, the patient's clinical symptoms regressed. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of the manifestation of pneumocephalus as the result of a neck stab wound in a child; overall, there are only three reported cases of pneumocephalus caused by a neck stab wound.
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keywords = wound
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15/84. Basic instinct in a feline.

    Reported cases in europe of large felines attacking humans are rare. Recently, in france, a man was attacked in an animal park by a tigress he had raised. He received fatal cervical wounds. This case of death by bites and lacerations, together with others in the recent international literature, underline the hereditary ferocity of such felines and the way in which they prefer to inflict lesions to the neck.
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keywords = wound
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16/84. Gunshot wounds to the neck.

    Gunshot wounds to the neck are diagnostically and therapeutically challenging cases. We report such a case with vascular and neurologic injuries and describe the therapeutic options. Initial treatment is aimed at hemodynamic stabilization. Zone II neck injuries are managed selectively, and physical examination alone may dictate emergency surgical exploration. spinal cord injury must be suspected and assessed clinically, as well as by computed tomography and angiography. Deteriorating or stable neurologic status and cord compression by bullet or bone fragments require surgical decompression. Improving neurologic status may be managed conservatively. In gunshot wounds to the neck, treatment should be individualized and multidisciplinary.
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ranking = 6
keywords = wound
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17/84. Traumatic Brown-Sequard-plus syndrome.

    BACKGROUND: In the 1840s Brown-Sequard described the motor and sensory effects of sectioning half of the spinal cord. Penetrating injuries can cause Brown-Sequard or, more frequently, Brown-Sequard-plus syndromes. OBJECTIVE: To report the case of a 25-year-old man who developed left-sided brown-sequard syndrome at the C8 level and left-sided horner syndrome plus urinary retention and bilateral extensor responses following a stab wound in the right side of the neck. RESULTS: magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low cervical lesion and somatosensory evoked potentials confirmed the clinical finding of left-side dorsal column disturbance. At follow-up, the patient's mobility and bladder function had returned to normal. CONCLUSION: This patient recovered well after a penetrating neck injury that disturbed function in more than half the lower cervical spinal cord (Brown-Sequard-plus syndrome).
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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18/84. Puncture wounds caused by glass mistaken for with stab wounds with a knife.

    Three cases are presented where fatal puncture wounds caused by broken glass were very similar to stab wounds inflicted by a knife with a single-edged blade. Thus, all three cases caused a murder investigation to be initiated. It could only be determined that these wounds had been caused by glass after a detailed forensic autopsy. In two of the three cases, the only evidence for this was the identification of glass fragments in the wounds. The importance of X-ray examinations is underlined because modern glass in common use is radiopaque. glass fragments lodged in the wounds can reduce the loss of blood and thus, prolong the capacity to act despite severe injuries.
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ranking = 13
keywords = wound
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19/84. suicide by more than 90 stab wounds including perforation of the skull.

    A man committed suicide in his bathroom using a small pocket knife. At the autopsy a total of 92 stab wounds on the forehead, in both temples, the anterior aspect of the neck, the back of the neck, the chest and the sides of the trunk were found. In addition, repeated stabbing had caused a large soft tissue defect on the forehead. The frontal bone showed 3 perforations but no brain injury was present and two ribs were severed in the bony part, one of which carried a star-like pattern from repeated stabbing. No major vessels were injured and the cause of death was exsanguination after a considerable survival time. The large number of stab wounds, the perforation of bone and some injury sites, especially the head and back of the neck, are extraordinary findings in suicides which were probably favoured by insufficient anatomical knowledge and the use of a short-bladed knife. A psychiatric history could not be verified.
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ranking = 6
keywords = wound
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20/84. Symmetrical necrosis of the solitary tract nuclei as a contributory cause of death.

    A 64-year-old man died in spite of surgery 4 days after attempting suicide. He first tried to hang himself with a rope and when the hanging did not succeed, he cut his throat with a knife. The autopsy showed four sutured cervical wounds with laryngeal wounds but without associated important vascular injury. The neuropathological study revealed two watershed-type haemorrhagic infarcts, involving the left occipital lobe and the left cerebellum. It also showed a symmetrical necrosis of solitary tract nuclei in the medullary tegmentum. Such a lesion is likely to result from sudden acute transient circulatory failure and might have played a role in the secondary autonomous cardiac and respiratory dysfunctions following a non-lethal trauma.
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ranking = 2
keywords = wound
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