Cases reported "Neck Pain"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/39. Spinal subdural hematoma: a rare complication of lumbar puncture. Case report and review of the literature.

    Spinal subdural hematoma, though rare, is an established complication of lumbar puncture. A young man with persistent back and neck pain after a traumatic lumbar puncture for the diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis is presented. A diagnosis of spinal subdural hematoma at T2 to T8 levels without significant spinal cord compression was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Symptoms resolved after one month of analgesics and muscle relaxants.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/39. The crowned dens syndrome: a rare form of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease.

    The crowned dens syndrome has been termed as acute neck pain ascribed to CPPD deposits associated with a tomographic appearance of calcification surrounding the odontoid process. This rare entity resulting in cervical cord compression is generally seen in older female patients. We present a 26-year-old woman with cervical cord compression due to massive calcification in the periodontoid area and discuss the X-ray and CT findings of the disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/39. Results of a longer than 10-year follow-Up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion.

    STUDY DESIGN: Evaluation of results a longer than 10-year follow-up of patients with upper cervical lesions due to rheumatoid arthritis who underwent occipitocervical fusion. OBJECTIVE: To determine the final outcome of patients with upper cervical lesions due to rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There are few studies reporting the final outcome of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion and observed for longer than 10 years. methods: The subjects were 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with myelopathy who underwent occipitocervical fusion with a rectangular rod more than 10 years ago. All 16 patients had irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation, and 11 also had vertical dislocation of the axis. All patients had preoperative nuchal pain, and were classified into Class II (two patients), Class IIIA (nine patients), and class IIIB (five patients) according to Ranawat's preoperative neurologic classification. RESULTS: The atlas-dens interval remained the same as immediately after surgery. Vertical dislocation returned to the preoperative condition, despite successful surgical correction. Preoperative occipital pain disappeared or was reduced in all cases. Myelopathy improved in 12 of the 16 patients (75%) by more than one class in the Ranawat preoperative neurologic classification. survival rate at 10 years after surgery was 38%; mean age at death was 70.7 years. The postoperative periods during which patients could walk by themselves ranged from 6 months to 13 years (mean, 7.5 years). CONCLUSIONS: Occipitocervical fusion for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is useful for decreasing nuchal pain, reducing myelopathy, and improving prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/39. Treatment of severe glaucomatous visual field deficit by chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy: a prospective case study and discussion.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the case of a patient with severely reduced visual fields arising from terminal glaucomatous retinal damage and the treatment of this condition by spinal manipulation. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 25-year-old uniocular female patient with congenital glaucoma sought chiropractic treatment for spinal pain, headache, and classic migraine. Advanced optic disk cupping was present, and loss of vision was near complete. A 3-degree island of central vision and a small area of peripheral light sensitivity had remained relatively stable for 3 years after a trabeculectomy procedure that had resulted in intraocular hypotony. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: It was considered possible that chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy may have a positive outcome in visual performance. Before commencing chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy, an ophthalmologic examination was performed, and visual performance was monitored through a course of treatment. Immediately after the first treatment, significant visual field improvement was recorded in the remaining eye. Maximal improvement of vision was achieved after 1 week (4 treatment sessions). Total monocular visual field had increased from approximately 2% to approximately 20% of normal. Corrected central acuity had improved from 6/12 to 6/9. Independent reexamination by the patient's regular ophthalmic surgeon confirmed the results. CONCLUSION: Recovery of vision in this patient was an unexpected and remarkable outcome, raising the question of whether chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy may be of value in the management of glaucomatous visual field loss. More intensive research is required.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/39. neck pain after minor neck trauma--is it always neck sprain?

    We report a patient who had headache and neck pain after whiplash injury and subsequently developed cerebellar infarction due to vertebral artery dissection. This patient's pain was out of proportion to his apparent injury and it was a clue to the final diagnosis. Gross motor examination for cord injury may not be adequate for patients with minor neck trauma. Detailed cranial nerve and cerebellar examination should be performed for detection of circulatory insufficiency. Discharge advice for patients should also include that of stroke or transient ischaemic attack.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/39. A cervical anterior spinal artery syndrome after diagnostic blockade of the right C6-nerve root.

    A 48-year-old man suffered from intractable neck pain irradiating to his right arm. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine was unremarkable. A right-sided diagnostic C6-nerve root blockade was performed. Immediately following this seemingly uneventful procedure he developed a MRI-proven fatal cervical spinal cord infarction. We describe the blood supply of the cervical spinal cord and suggest that this infarction resulted from an impaired perfusion of the major feeding anterior radicular artery of the spinal cord, after local injection of iotrolan, bupivacaine, and triamcinolon-hexacetonide around the C6-nerve root on the right side.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/39. Anomalous vertebral artery-induced cervical cord compression causing severe nape pain. Case report.

    The authors describe a very rare case of cervical cord compression caused by anomalous bilateral vertebral arteries (VAs). A 65-year-old woman had been suffering from intractable nape pain and torticollis. magnetic resonance imaging revealed a signal void region in which spinal cord compression was present. angiography demonstrated anomalous bilateral VAs compressing the spinal cord. Microvascular decompressive surgery was successfully performed. Neuroradiological and intraoperative findings are presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/39. Complications related to hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer in anterior cervical spine surgery.

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a report of complications related to the hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer used for anterior cervical reconstructive surgery. Compression of the spinal cord by broken fragments of hydroxyapatite spacer as well as its surrounding radiolucent clear zone were observed in seven patients. OBJECTIVES: To report complications related to the use of hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer for anterior cervical reconstructive surgery and to discuss how to prevent these complications. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Despite previous articles reporting the clinical applications of hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer for the cervical spine, clinical reports regarding the long-term results of hydroxyapatite spacer for anterior cervical surgery and its complications have been limited. methods: The authors reviewed patients who underwent anterior reconstructive surgery using the hydroxyapatite spacer at other hospitals and had postoperative complications related to hydroxyapatite spacer. RESULTS: Seven patients previously treated by anterior cervical spine surgery using the hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer were referred to the authors because of unsatisfactory surgical outcomes. All the patients had a radiolucent clear zone around the spacer and experienced severe neck pain. Four had fracture of the hydroxyapatite spacer, and two had compression of the spinal cord by retropulsed fragments of broken hydroxyapatite spacers. CONCLUSIONS: Although hydroxyapatite has been used in many medical fields because of its bioactive characteristics, its mechanical properties should be improved to lessen the risks of breakage and subsequent spinal cord compression. Gentle insertion maneuvers are also important to avoid the production of cracks inside the spacer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/39. Subdural hematoma after cervical epidural steroid injection.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report is presented involving a subdural hematoma after cervical epidural steroid injection. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a previously unreported complication of cervical epidural steroid injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Cervical epidural steroid injection is a common procedure performed in the care of patients with spine-related complaints. Reports of complications are rare, and most of these are fairly benign. To the authors' knowledge, subdural hematoma has never been described as a complication of a cervical epidural steroid injection. methods: A patient underwent an uncomplicated cervical epidural steroid injection by an experienced anesthesiologist. She developed acute onset of axial pain followed by progressive quadriparesis within a matter of 8 hours. She was transferred from a local emergency room after a CT scan suggested posterior cord displacement consistent with an anterior spinal hematoma from C3 to C5. She was taken to the operating room for urgent decompression. Exploration revealed an anterior subdural hematoma that was evacuated followed by dural closure with a patch. RESULTS: After surgery the patient was initially quadriplegic but rapidly gained full function in the left upper and lower extremities. She was making steady progress with motor recovery on the right side when she developed acute meningitis about 8 days after surgery, and then she subsequently went into cardiopulmonary arrest. She was successfully resuscitated but remained critically ill with no evidence of encouraging neurologic function. Six days later she had a second cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to acknowledge that spinal hematomas can occur after cervical epidural steroid injection, as prompt recognition and treatment could improve the prognosis for recovery. The sequelae of a cervical subdural hematoma after epidural steroid injection remain potentially devastating.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/39. MRI confirmed cervical cord injury caused by spinal manipulation in a Chinese patient.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a rare case of cervical cord injury caused by spinal manipulation in a Chinese patient. METHOD: A 46-year-old man suffered from acute tetraplegia immediately after spinal manipulation by a bonesetter. There was nothing abnormal in the plain X-ray but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of his cervical spine demonstrated cervical cord oedema at the level of C1/2. RESULT: The patient was treated with high doses of methylprednisolone. Coupled with intensive rehabilitation, the patient made a nearly complete recovery 6 months after injury. Repeated MRI demonstrated syrinx formation at the previous location of cervical cord oedema. CONCLUSION: Spinal manipulation may cause cervical cord injury. MRI is useful in the documentation of this injury and exclusion of other pathology.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = cord
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Neck Pain'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.