Cases reported "Neck Pain"

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1/29. A solitary bone cyst in the spinous process of the cervical spine: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report. OBJECTIVES: To illustrate a rare case of histologically confirmed solitary bone cyst involving the spinous process of C7. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A solitary bone cyst involving the spine is very unusual. Although four cases of a solitary bone cyst in the spine have been reported in the literature, the current authors have been able to find only one case of solitary bone cyst in the spinous process. All four patients reported in the literature were over 30 years of age. The patient in the current case was a 13-year-old girl with no history of trauma. methods: Radiographs and a computed tomography scan of the cervical spine were performed before the operation, as was a histologic examination to make a diagnosis of the lesion. RESULTS: The intraoperative findings from examination of the stagnant fluid within the lesion and the histologic examination indicated the diagnosis of a solitary bone cyst. CONCLUSIONS: A solitary bone cyst in the spine is rare, especially in the young. An osteolytic lesion in the spinous process of the spine tends to be diagnosed as an osteoblastoma or as a giant cell tumor of the bone. A solitary bone cyst of the spine, although rare, must be considered as a differential diagnosis.
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2/29. Results of a longer than 10-year follow-Up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion.

    STUDY DESIGN: Evaluation of results a longer than 10-year follow-up of patients with upper cervical lesions due to rheumatoid arthritis who underwent occipitocervical fusion. OBJECTIVE: To determine the final outcome of patients with upper cervical lesions due to rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There are few studies reporting the final outcome of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion and observed for longer than 10 years. methods: The subjects were 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with myelopathy who underwent occipitocervical fusion with a rectangular rod more than 10 years ago. All 16 patients had irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation, and 11 also had vertical dislocation of the axis. All patients had preoperative nuchal pain, and were classified into Class II (two patients), Class IIIA (nine patients), and class IIIB (five patients) according to Ranawat's preoperative neurologic classification. RESULTS: The atlas-dens interval remained the same as immediately after surgery. Vertical dislocation returned to the preoperative condition, despite successful surgical correction. Preoperative occipital pain disappeared or was reduced in all cases. Myelopathy improved in 12 of the 16 patients (75%) by more than one class in the Ranawat preoperative neurologic classification. survival rate at 10 years after surgery was 38%; mean age at death was 70.7 years. The postoperative periods during which patients could walk by themselves ranged from 6 months to 13 years (mean, 7.5 years). CONCLUSIONS: Occipitocervical fusion for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is useful for decreasing nuchal pain, reducing myelopathy, and improving prognosis.
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3/29. Presentation of a previously asymptomatic Chiari I malformation by a flexion injury to the neck.

    Flexion injury and/or whiplash injury to the neck in car accidents are usually trivial injuries with no serious neurological deficits. Our intention was to point out the importance to proceed with diagnostic procedures if neurological deficits do occur in order to reveal the true cause of the deficit. The paper presents the case of a 35-year-old woman who sustained a flexion injury to the neck. A relatively trivial injury to the neck promoted a progressive neurological deterioration. The standard diagnostic procedures (x-ray, computed tomography scan) were normal. Further diagnostics with magnetic resonance imaging was required to reveal an underlying Chiari I malformation. Finally, the operative decompression of the craniocervical junction was performed. Following the surgical treatment, the patient's clinical symptoms regressed. One year after her discharge, she remains in good physical condition. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of the manifestation of Chiari I malformation in the adult as a result of a flexion or whiplash injury of the neck. This unusual case suggests that in a trivial flexion injury to the neck sustained in a car accident, which presents with serious neurological dysfunction, and where the standard diagnostic procedures are normal, the possibility of underlying congenital abnormality, such as Chiari I malformation should be considered.
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4/29. Anomalous vertebral artery-induced cervical cord compression causing severe nape pain. Case report.

    The authors describe a very rare case of cervical cord compression caused by anomalous bilateral vertebral arteries (VAs). A 65-year-old woman had been suffering from intractable nape pain and torticollis. magnetic resonance imaging revealed a signal void region in which spinal cord compression was present. angiography demonstrated anomalous bilateral VAs compressing the spinal cord. Microvascular decompressive surgery was successfully performed. Neuroradiological and intraoperative findings are presented.
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5/29. Complications related to hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer in anterior cervical spine surgery.

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a report of complications related to the hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer used for anterior cervical reconstructive surgery. Compression of the spinal cord by broken fragments of hydroxyapatite spacer as well as its surrounding radiolucent clear zone were observed in seven patients. OBJECTIVES: To report complications related to the use of hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer for anterior cervical reconstructive surgery and to discuss how to prevent these complications. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Despite previous articles reporting the clinical applications of hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer for the cervical spine, clinical reports regarding the long-term results of hydroxyapatite spacer for anterior cervical surgery and its complications have been limited. methods: The authors reviewed patients who underwent anterior reconstructive surgery using the hydroxyapatite spacer at other hospitals and had postoperative complications related to hydroxyapatite spacer. RESULTS: Seven patients previously treated by anterior cervical spine surgery using the hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer were referred to the authors because of unsatisfactory surgical outcomes. All the patients had a radiolucent clear zone around the spacer and experienced severe neck pain. Four had fracture of the hydroxyapatite spacer, and two had compression of the spinal cord by retropulsed fragments of broken hydroxyapatite spacers. CONCLUSIONS: Although hydroxyapatite has been used in many medical fields because of its bioactive characteristics, its mechanical properties should be improved to lessen the risks of breakage and subsequent spinal cord compression. Gentle insertion maneuvers are also important to avoid the production of cracks inside the spacer.
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6/29. Clinical case seminar: Riedel's thyroiditis: report of a case complicated by spontaneous hypoparathyroidism, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, and Horner's syndrome.

    A 42-yr-old woman presented with hyperthyroidism and a large, firm, irregular goiter. Within a few weeks she became hypothyroid. Five months later she developed increasingly severe neck pain and compressive symptoms. The goiter had become rock hard. A fine needle aspiration biopsy showed features of chronic thyroiditis and fibrosis. She partially responded to a course of glucocorticoids. tamoxifen was added, with marked improvement in goiter size and pain. Both medications were tapered off. Two months later the patient experienced paresthesias of the fingertips, perioral numbness, and a seizure. She was found to have spontaneous primary hypoparathyroidism. Three months later the patient became hoarse and experienced difficulty in breathing. She was found to have a massively enlarged thyroid with compression of the right internal jugular vein and encasement of the right carotid artery as well as tracheal narrowing. She also had right vocal cord paralysis due to recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement. Because of airway compromise, an emergency isthmusectomy was performed, and the patient was given a postoperative course of glucocorticoids with gradual improvement. Postoperative diagnosis was Riedel's thyroiditis. Two months later she presented with near-syncope and was found to have bradycardia, hypotension, and right Horner's syndrome, presumably due to compression of the right carotid sheath. She was given i.v. glucocorticoids and tamoxifen. Six months later and 18 months after her initial presentation, the patient is doing remarkably well. Her goiter has regressed by more than 50%, and she no longer has any pain or difficulty breathing. She remains a little hoarse and has persistent hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism. She is taking prednisone (5 mg, this is being tapered very slowly) and tamoxifen (20 mg) daily. This case illustrates the protean manifestations of Riedel's thyroiditis, a rare but fascinating disease. The epidemiology of this disease, its pathophysiology and complications, and the roles of surgery and medical therapy are reviewed.
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7/29. Anterior cervical arthrodesis using DOC dynamic stabilization implant for improvement in sagittal angulation and controlled settling.

    OBJECT: Placing instrumentation in the anterior cervical spine is a common procedure. The bi- and unicortical systems currently available, however, have distinct advantages and disadvantages. The author reports a prospective series in which a new dynamized anterior cervical fixation system was evaluated. methods: Thirty-seven patients underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in which the DOC ventral cervical stabilization system was used for indications including cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, disc herniation, trauma, and myelopathy. patients underwent anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion and/or corpectomy. Preoperative and postoperative clinical data included assessment of spinal cord and nerve root deficit, function, neck pain, and arm pain. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic data included sagittal angle, translation, and settling of the graft. Fusion status was determined by the presence of trabecular bridging bone on plain anteroposterior and lateral cervical radiographs. At a mean follow-up time of 1.3 years, postoperative neck or arm pain was resolved in 52% of the patients, restriction on function was mild or absent in 88%, and fusion was successful in 80% of patients and 88% of the treated levels. There was one implant-related complication, one significant dysphagia complication, and a 10.8% donor graft site complication rate. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this system led to a high percentage of pain relief and radiographic fusion. The sagittal angle was controlled while allowing for graft settling. There were no implant failures.
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8/29. darier disease: sustained improvement following reduction mammaplasty.

    darier disease is an autosomal-dominant inherited genodermatosis. A woman is described who had darier disease and hereditary spherocytosis whose inframammary darier disease had dramatic and sustained improvement following reduction mammaplasty. The postoperative resolution of the dermatosis beneath the patient's breasts introduces the possibility that, when appropriately indicated, breast reduction surgery may have a potential role in the management of severe inframammary darier disease.
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9/29. Extramedullary sarcoid lesion mimicking intraspinal tumor.

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Spinal sarcoidosis is rare. Most spinal sarcoid lesions are intramedullary, and only three cases of extramedullary sarcoid lesions have been reported. PURPOSE: To describe a case of an extramedullary sarcoid lesion in a patient that did not have systemic involvement and to review the literature of spinal sarcoidosis. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: Case report and review of the literature. PATIENT SAMPLE: Case report. OUTCOME MEASURES: Report of resolution of symptoms. methods/DESCRIPTION:The patient was a 33-year-old woman who had neck pain and pain radiating to the right scapula area and down the right arm into her hand and wrist. She also complained of numbness, tingling, muscle spasms and tremors, and had difficulty with writing. magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass that was extramedullary in the right lateral aspect of the spinal canal at the level of C5 and extending into the right C5-6 neuroforamen. Admitting diagnosis of neurofibroma was made. The patient underwent C4, C5 and C6 laminoplasty and gross total resection of an intradural extramedullary tumor. The lesion encroached on the neuroforamen on the right side involving the C6 nerve root, was grossly adherent to some of the rootlets and looked like a Schwannoma. Gross total resection of the tumor was performed. Pathological examination of the specimen showed a noncaseating granulomatosis consistent with sarcoid. Postoperative testing did not reveal systemic involvement of sarcoidosis. The patient was treated with corticosteroids. RESULTS: The patient made a satisfactory recovery, returned to work full-time, and had no complaints of neurological symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: An extramedullary sarcoid lesion is rare. Unlike intramedullary sarcoid lesions, it can be totally removed. If no systemic sarcoidosis is present, the patient can have a satisfactory recovery.
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10/29. Intramedullary subependymoma of the spinal cord: a case report and review of literature.

    A case of cervical spine intramedullary subependymoma in a 52-year-old female is reported. Also, the relevant literature on the 40 cases reported till date is reviewed. magnetic resonance imaging, even with enhancement, does not show any distinctive features making pre-operative diagnosis often difficult. These tumours are eccentrically located within the spinal cord, thus enabling complete tumour removal in most cases. They are benign with low proliferative potential and hence no post-operative radiotherapy should be administered.
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