Cases reported "Neck Pain"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/29. Cervical epidural abscess after epidural steroid injection.

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a case report of a cervical epidural abscess presenting with neurologic deficits after cervical epidural steroid injection. OBJECTIVE: To describe the presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of a rare complication of cervical epidural steroid injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Cervical epidural steroid injections are a commonly used modality in the treatment of cervical spine disease. Serious complications from the procedure are rare. There is only one previously reported case of cervical epidural abscess after cervical epidural injection in the literature. MATERIALS AND methods: A case of cervical epidural abscess after epidural steroid injection is presented and the relevant literature is reviewed. RESULTS: The patient had partial recovery of neurologic function within the first 24 hours after decompressive laminectomy, irrigation, and debridement. There were no perioperative complications. Intraoperative cultures permitted positive identification of the infecting organism and appropriate antibiotic selection. At 7-month follow-up, there was no recurrence of infection and the patient had recovered baseline neurologic function and neck pain status. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical epidural abscess is a rare but potentially devastating complication after epidural steroid injection. Neurologic compromise may occur. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment may result in good clinical outcomes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/29. Unilateral cervical facet fracture: presentation of two cases and literature review.

    STUDY DESIGN: Two patients with diagnosis of unilateral cervical facet fracture due to motor vehicle accident (MVA) are presented, and the literature is reviewed. OBJECTIVE: To discuss the diagnostic difficulties and management strategies in two patients with post-traumatic cervical facet fracture. SETTING: Department of neurosurgery, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, faculty of medicine, turkey. SUBJECT: Nonoperative treatment with immobilization was preferred in two female cases (33-34 years old) with diagnosis of C6-7 facet fracture following MVA. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be performed in acute period in the first case, but not in the second because of inadequate technical condition. RESULT: The first case with a good compliance to immobilization recovered without any neurological complication. However, the second case mobilized earlier and used a collar irregularly. Instability developed in the second case on the second month and surgical intervention with anterior approach was performed. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of unilateral facet fractures is often missed and the treatment is still controversial. The compliance of the patient to cervical immobilization in nonoperative treatment plays a very important role in the development of late complications. MRI in the acute period may be useful in determining instability.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/29. Occult congenital anomaly of the atlas presenting in the setting of acute trauma.

    Congenital absence of the posterior arch of the atlas is rare. Its detection in the setting of acute trauma may be confusing and mimic a fracture. This case serves to highlight the adjunctive use of computed tomography in equivocal cases. Most patients can be managed conservatively, however operative treatment should be reserved for patients in whom atlanto-axial instability has been shown.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/29. Grisel's syndrome: the two-hit hypothesis--a case report and literature review.

    Grisel's syndrome is a rare but well-documented clinical entity. It is a nontraumatic, fixed rotary subluxation of C1 on C2 (atlantoaxial). Although first described in 1830, the exact mechanism of Grisel's syndrome remains unclear. We present a postoperative case of Grisel's syndrome and an extensive literature review, and we propose a mechanism for its pathogenesis. In addition, we propose a treatment algorithm for Grisel's syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/29. Case report: whiplash-associated disorder from a low-velocity bumper car collision: history, evaluation, and surgery.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report of a patient with a whiplash-associated disorder following a bumper car collision. Imaging studies failed to provide an anatomic explanation for the debilitating symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To report a chronic, debilitating pain syndrome after a low-velocity bumper car collision while using complex range-of-motion data for the diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical indication in whiplash-associated disorder. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The controversy of whiplash-associated disorder mainly concerns pathophysiology and collision dynamics. Although many investigations attempt to define a universal lesion or determine a threshold of force that may cause permanent injury, no consensus has been reached. methods: Eight years after a low-velocity collision, the patient underwent surgical excision of multiple painful trigger points in the posterior neck. Computerized motion analysis was used for pre- and postoperative evaluations. RESULTS: Surgical treatment resulted in an increase in total active range of motion by 20%, reduced intake of pain medication, doubled the number of work hours, and generally led to a dramatic improvement in quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: This case of whiplash-associated disorder after a low-velocity collision highlights the difficulty in defining threshold of injury in regard to velocity. It also illustrates the value of computerized motion analysis in confirming the diagnosis of whiplash-associated disorder and in the evaluation of prognosis and treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/29. Long-term results of occipitothoracic fusion surgery in RA patients with destruction of the cervical spine.

    OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study of the outcome of occipitothoracic fusion surgery in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with destruction of the cervical spine, designed to assess the efficacy of halo vest before surgery, the postoperative outcome, and the activities-of-daily living (ADL) problems associated with surgical management. There have been no reports regarding these issues, including surgical effect on subjacent vertebrae. methods: This study included 20 RA patients with destruction of the cervical spine. All patients underwent preoperative halo vest followed by occipitothoracic fusion with an average follow-up of 5 years. The long-term clinical outcomes were analyzed using a modified Ranawat classification. RESULTS: Before halo application, the neurologic status was assessed as IIIC in 15 patients and IIIB in 5 patients. After halo application, the neurologic status improved in all patients: IIIA in 12 patients and IIIB in 8 patients. After surgery, the neurologic status did not improve in six of the eight IIIB patients but improved to IIIA in two patients. Of the 12 IIIA patients, the neurologic status improved to II in 6 patients but did not improve in the other 6 patients. patient satisfaction was excellent for 14 patients, good for 3 patients, and fair for only 3 patients (1 had difficulty drinking, another had back pain, and the last had low back pain associated with a compression fracture of the lumbar spine). CONCLUSIONS: We have performed occipitothoracic fusion surgery in RA patients with destruction of the cervical spine. Preoperative halo vest was very effective for improving the neurologic status, for the general condition, and for an optimal sagittal alignment. Occipitothoracic fusion using unit rods gave satisfactory long-term clinical results compared with the prognosis of patients in whom the disease follows its natural course.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/29. Cervical arthroplasty complicated by delayed spontaneous fusion. Case report.

    The authors describe the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with a left C-6 radiculopathy and neck pain and in whom there was evidence of disc/osteophyte compression of the left C-6 nerve root. The patient underwent a C5-6 anterior cervical decompression and placement of a Bryan disc prosthesis. More than 7000 cervical discs have been inserted worldwide. Postoperatively, dynamic imaging demonstrated loss of motion at the instrumented level. The patient suffered persistent neck and arm pain that was slow to resolve. Seventeen months after the initial surgery osseous fusion was observed across the interspace and posterior surface of the prosthesis. This is the first documented case of fusion occurring at the level at which cervical arthroplasty had been performed. The precise reason for this phenomenon is unclear, but potential contributing factors include patient-related issues, poor motion due to neck pain, or possibly implant-related issues. To date, this is an exceedingly rare complication and warrants careful and prolonged follow up of all arthroplasty-treated cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/29. Bilateral C5 motor paralysis following anterior cervical surgery--a case report.

    Numerous authors have reported C5 root palsies following posterior cervical surgery, and several mechanisms of injury have been proposed. Similar deficits after anterior cervical procedures are considered to occur less commonly. We report on a 48-year-old male who underwent multi-level anterior discectomy and fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Bilateral C5 nerve root deficits were noticed in the immediate postoperative period, and treated non-operatively. A postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed an increase in cervical lordosis accompanied by a posterior shifting of the spinal cord. Potential mechanisms of nerve root injury in this situation are discussed, and the literature on postoperative C5 root deficits is reviewed. The patient returned to his preoperative occupation as an operating room nurse 6 months following surgery, with complete neurologic recovery occurring over an 11-month period. C5 deficits following anterior cervical surgery occur more frequently than generally assumed. Improved lordosis and longitudinal lengthening of the cervical spinal column in multilevel anterior decompression and interbody fusion can paradoxically result in a traction injury to the spinal cord and C5 nerve roots.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/29. Suspected pharyngoesophageal perforation after a difficult intubation: a case report.

    Although uncommon and rarely reported, pharyngoesophageal perforation has medical and legal consequences of substantial proportion. Perforation of the upper aerodigestive system may result in severe airway complications that include pneumothorax, pneumonia, mediastinitis, and retropharyngeal abscess. Despite the relative rare occurrence of esophageal perforation during intubation, this type of injury is associated with the poorest outcome, especially when the diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Our case report presents a healthy 23-year-old female for a thyroidectomy. Postoperatively she developed what appeared to be symptoms of pharyngoesophageal injury, suspected to be related to blunt trauma from laryngoscopy. knowledge of and prompt attention to the cardinal signs of pharyngoesophageal injury in partnership between the anesthetist and the surgical team were the key instruments in ruling out this potentially devastating diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/29. Bilateral traumatic neuroma of the anterior cervical nerve root: case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVES: A rare case of anterior cervical second root traumatic neuroma with no history of trauma is reported, and possible etiology is discussed. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Traumatic neuroma is the reactive, nonneoplastic proliferation in the injured nerve. Several atypical locations of traumatic neuroma have been reported. To date, only 4 cervical traumatic neuroma cases with no history of trauma have been reported, and, to our knowledge, there is no case of bilateral cervical traumatic neuroma published in the literature. methods: A patient with a history of neck and left upper extremity pain, who had hypoesthesia in left C2 dermatome on neurologic examination is presented. A left C2-C3 hemilaminectomy and tumor extirpation were performed. RESULTS: A histopathologic study revealed features of a typical traumatic neuroma. The patient had no deficits on her postoperative neurologic examination, and her neck and left arm pain improved. The unusual location of this lesion and possible etiology of such a traumatic neuroma are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: A rare case of anterior bilateral cervical second root traumatic neuroma with no history of trauma is reported. An unnoticed history of trauma may play an etiologic role in the development of these lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Neck Pain'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.