Cases reported "Neck Pain"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Human and behavioral factors contributing to spine-based neurological cockpit injuries in pilots of high-performance aircraft: recommendations for management and prevention.

    In high-performance aircraft, the need for total environmental awareness coupled with high-g loading (often with abrupt onset) creates a predilection for cervical spine injury while the pilot is performing routine movements within the cockpit. In this study, the prevalence and severity of cervical spine injury are assessed via a modified cross-sectional survey of pilots of multiple aircraft types (T-38 and F-14, F-16, and F/A-18 fighters). Ninety-five surveys were administered, with 58 full responses. Fifty percent of all pilots reported in-flight or immediate post-flight spine-based pain, and 90% of fighter pilots reported at least one event, most commonly (> 90%) occurring during high-g (> 5 g) turns of the aircraft with the head deviated from the anatomical neutral position. Pre-flight stretching was not associated with a statistically significant reduction in neck pain episodes in this evaluation, whereas a regular weight training program in the F/A-18 group approached a significant reduction (mean = 2.492; p < 0.064). Different cockpit ergonomics may vary the predisposition to cervical injury from airframe to airframe. Several strategies for prevention are possible from both an aircraft design and a preventive medicine standpoint. Countermeasure strategies against spine injury in pilots of high-performance aircraft require additional research, so that future aircraft will not be limited by the human in control.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = research
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Treatment of severe glaucomatous visual field deficit by chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy: a prospective case study and discussion.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the case of a patient with severely reduced visual fields arising from terminal glaucomatous retinal damage and the treatment of this condition by spinal manipulation. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 25-year-old uniocular female patient with congenital glaucoma sought chiropractic treatment for spinal pain, headache, and classic migraine. Advanced optic disk cupping was present, and loss of vision was near complete. A 3-degree island of central vision and a small area of peripheral light sensitivity had remained relatively stable for 3 years after a trabeculectomy procedure that had resulted in intraocular hypotony. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: It was considered possible that chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy may have a positive outcome in visual performance. Before commencing chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy, an ophthalmologic examination was performed, and visual performance was monitored through a course of treatment. Immediately after the first treatment, significant visual field improvement was recorded in the remaining eye. Maximal improvement of vision was achieved after 1 week (4 treatment sessions). Total monocular visual field had increased from approximately 2% to approximately 20% of normal. Corrected central acuity had improved from 6/12 to 6/9. Independent reexamination by the patient's regular ophthalmic surgeon confirmed the results. CONCLUSION: Recovery of vision in this patient was an unexpected and remarkable outcome, raising the question of whether chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy may be of value in the management of glaucomatous visual field loss. More intensive research is required.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = research
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. chiropractic treatment of postsurgical neck syndrome with mechanical force, manually assisted short-lever spinal adjustments.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of postsurgical neck pain, after multiple spinal surgeries, that was successfully treated by chiropractic intervention with instrumental adjustment of the cervical spine. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 35-year-old woman had chronic neck pain for over 5 years after two separate surgeries of the cervical spine: a diskectomy at C3/4 and a fusion at C5/6. Surgeries were performed 6 months apart in an attempt to resolve persistent neck pain and spasm of the cervical musculature. Neither surgery was effective in relieving the patient's pain. Five years after the second surgery, a third surgery was recommended by the patient's physicians to alleviate the chronic pain. The patient sought chiropractic evaluation of her condition to avoid further surgical intervention. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: The patient was treated with conservative instrumental chiropractic manipulation, consisting of mechanical force, manually assisted short-lever spinal adjustments rendered with an Activator Adjusting Instrument (AAI) II. She comfortably tolerated the treatment and responded favorably to this therapy. All chronic symptoms had resolved within 30 days of instituting the chiropractic instrumental adjustments with an AAI. More interestingly, longitudinal examination over the next 2 years showed that the patient experienced no residual effects or further recurrences of her previous chronic problem after her initial course of chiropractic care. CONCLUSION: chiropractic treatment of postsurgical neck syndrome may be effectively treated, in certain cases, by mechanical force, manually assisted adjusting procedures with an AAI. The use of instrumental adjustment methodology may provide chiropractic physicians with an effective alternative to manual manipulation in those cases in which the patient's surgical history or presenting symptoms make forceful manipulation of the spine, particularly performed at end range, inappropriate. This approach may be contemplated by physicians faced with managing this type of condition. Further study should be made in this regard, in an academic research setting, to determine the safest and most effective approaches to managing postsurgical patients in a chiropractic setting.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = research
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. The amelioration of symptoms in cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord deformation through specific chiropractic manipulation: a case report with long-term follow-up.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the chiropractic management of a patient with paresthesia on the entire left side of her body and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented cervical spinal cord deformation secondary to cervical spinal stenosis. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 70-year-old special education teacher had neck pain, headaches, and burning paresthesia on the entire left side of her body. These symptoms developed within hours of being injured in a side-impact motor vehicle accident. Prior to her visit, she had been misdiagnosed with a cerebrovascular accident. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOMES: Additional diagnostic studies revealed that the patient was suffering from cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord deformation. Two manipulative technique systems (Advanced Biostructural Therapy and Atlas Coccygeal Technique) unique to the chiropractic profession and based on the theory of relief of adverse mechanical neural tension were administered to the patient. This intervention provided complete relief of the patient's complaints. The patient remained symptom-free at long-term follow-up, 1 year postaccident. CONCLUSION: There is a paucity of published reports describing the treatment of cervical spinal stenosis through manipulative methods. Existing reports of the manipulative management of cervical spondylosis suggest that traditional manual therapy is ineffective or even contraindicated. This case reports the excellent short-term and long-term response of a 70-year-old patient with MRI-documented cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord deformation to less traditional, uniquely chiropractic manipulative techniques. This appears to be the first case (reported in the indexed literature) that describes the successful amelioration of the symptoms of cervical spinal stenosis through chiropractic manipulation. More research into the less traditional chiropractic systems of spinal manipulation should be undertaken.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = research
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Does 'normal' vision improve with spinal manipulation?

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss a patient whose spinal abnormalities may have caused subliminal visual field loss. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 22-yr-old man suffered from a painful neck. His vision was in the normal range, as measured by computerized static perimetry. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: To define a guideline for a proposed investigation into visual field changes with spinal adjustment, his visual fields were tested before and after a normal office spinal manipulation. After this procedure, there was a measurable rise in the visual sensitivity of both eyes. CONCLUSION: The use of computerized static perimetry changes to measure the cerebral effects of spinal manipulation is recommended for future chiropractic research.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = research
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Neck Pain'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.