Cases reported "Necrosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/137. Vascular changes in tuberculous meningoencephalitis.

    Our report refers two cases of tuberculous encephalomeningitis which differ in the course and pathological changes. In case 1 blood vessels showed features of peri, endo-, or panvasculites. In some vessels endothelium proliferation leading to the stenosis or obliteration of the vascular lumen was observed. necrosis was an effect of vessels occlusion. In case 2 many fewer vessel were involved in onflammation process. Vascular changes were also less extensive and were observed more rarely. Tuberculous infection often caused less tissue lesions than vascular changes. Different pathological changes probably depend on the type and virulence of Myobacterium tuberculosis and on the host immune response to the infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis, meningoencephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/137. CT appearances of hepatic involvement in systemic varicella-zoster.

    In a patient suffering from T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and systemic varicella-zoster, contrast enhanced CT showed multiple hypodense nodular lesions in the liver which corresponded to areas of focal liver necrosis. This appearance on CT may be characteristic of varicella-zoster involvement of the liver.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.64999769579127
keywords = varicella, zoster
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/137. Acute encephalopathy with bilateral striatal necrosis: favourable response to corticosteroid therapy.

    A case of acute encephalopathy with selective bilateral symmetrical striatal lesions is reported. The patient was a previously healthy 4-year-old boy who became obtunded after a febrile illness and fell into a state of delirium with severe pain in the feet. He showed abnormal postures: hyperextension of the neck and upper limbs and extreme flexion of both lower limbs, and abnormal involuntary movements of the limbs: tremor, athetotic movement and right hemiballismus. Analysis of serum antibody titres suggested recent primary infection of herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1). Cranial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated areas of high-signal intensity involving the whole basal ganglia bilaterally. He showed rapid clinical improvement after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy; complete clinical recovery was noted 3 months after the onset. Serial MRI studies demonstrated a rapid reduction of the lesions, resulting in only slight T2-hyperintense areas in both caudate nuclei. The pathogenesis of the disorder remains unknown, though an autoimmune mechanism has been speculated. The clinical and laboratory findings in this case suggested a possible role of HSV-1 in the pathomechanism of the disorder and a beneficial effect of early corticosteroid therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.041837483930137
keywords = herpes
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/137. Graft failure in human donor corneas due to transmission of herpes simplex virus.

    AIM: To report the clinical consequences of contamination of human donor corneas by herpes simplex virus (HSV) in organ culture. methods: Two patients without previous history of ocular HSV infection underwent penetrating keratoplasty (PK), one for keratoconus and the other for fuchs' endothelial dystrophy. One patient suffered primary graft failure while the other developed a persistent epithelial defect, ultimately resulting in graft failure. Viral culture of swabs taken from both corneas during the early postoperative period was undertaken. The failed donor corneas were examined histopathologically by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for HSV-1 antigens, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HSV dna. Both failed corneas were replaced within 6 weeks of the initial surgery. The records of the fellow donor corneas were also examined for evidence of infection. RESULTS: HSV was cultured from both corneas during the early postoperative period. histology of both donor corneas demonstrated a thickened corneal stroma with widespread necrosis of keratocytes and loss of endothelial cells. IHC showed keratocytes positive with antibodies to HSV-1 antigens. TEM demonstrated HSV-like viral particles within degenerating keratocytes. PCR performed on the failed corneal grafts was positive for HSV-1 dna, whereas PCR performed on the excised host corneal buttons was negative in both patients. Records of the fellow donor corneas showed that one cornea was successfully transplanted into another recipient after 18 days in organ culture, whilst the other was discarded because of extensive endothelial cell necrosis noted after 15 days in organ culture. CONCLUSION: HSV within a donor cornea may cause endothelial destruction in organ culture and both primary graft failure and ulcerative keratitis after transplantation. Endothelial necrosis of a donor cornea in culture also raises the possibility of HSV infection within the fellow cornea.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.20918741965068
keywords = herpes
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/137. association of herpes simplex virus encephalitis and paraneoplastic encephalitis - a clinico-pathological study.

    A 57 year-old woman developed acute limbic encephalitis and brainstem dysfunction. Anti-HU antibodies were repeatedly detected in serum and CSF. Postmortem examination showed necrotic and hemorrhagic lesions in the temporal lobes characteristic of herpes simplex virus encephalitis, which was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, and Purkinje cell loss with proliferation of Bergman glia and myelin loss in the external aspect of the dentate nuclei characteristic of paraneoplastic encephalitis. PCR-assay performed on temporal tissue extracts was positive for HSV-1. There was no identifiable neoplasm. This unusual association raises the possibility of a link between the two diseases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.8091099432695
keywords = encephalitis, herpes
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/137. CSF interleukin-6 in neonatal Citrobacter ventriculitis after meningitis.

    An infant with neonatal severe citrobacter koseri (formerly Citrobacter diversus) meningoencephalitis developed necrosis with multicystic regression of both hemispheres. The ventriculitis persisted over months in spite of antibiotic therapy.The treatment succeeded with cefotaxime in a high dose (300 mg/kg/day) without surgical intervention.The infant had been previously treated with cefotaxime (200 mg/kg/day) over 5 weeks. High levels of CSF interleukin-6 (IL-6) permitted to attribute persisting CSF pleocytosis in spite of sterile CSF cultures to chronic infection and not to reminiscence of brain necrosis. This report reveals two main points. On the one hand, the importance of therapy monitoring with IL-6 in CSF for the consequent treatment of Citrobacter meningitis and on the other hand, high-dose cefotaxime (300 mg/kg/day) treatment of Citrobacter ventriculitis, which succeeded without surgical intervention.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = encephalitis, meningoencephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/137. Fatal infectious mononucleosis. association with liver necrosis and herpes-like virus particles.

    A 20-year-old woman died of infectious mononucleosis associated with extensive hepatic necrosis with herpes-type inclusions within nuclei of remaining liver cells. Electron microscopical examination of these liver cells showed intranuclear and occasional intracytoplasmic herpes-like virus. This case supports the concept that a herpes-like virus, or a structurally closely related agent, is the etiological agent of infectious mononucleosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.29286238751096
keywords = herpes
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/137. Herpesvirus infection of seborrheic keratoses.

    We present three examples of patients with seborrheic keratoses complicated by necrotizing herpesvirus infection. Two patients had localized cutaneous herpetic infections, and the third patient had a generalized cutaneous herpesvirus infection. Two of the lesions were thought to be squamous cell carcinoma. The third was clinically identified as inflamed seborrheic keratosis. Herpesvirus infection was not clinically suspected in two of the patients. The histologic changes were similar in all cases. Epidermal proliferation was accompanied by hyperkeratosis and pseudo horn cyst formation. Extensive keratinocyte necrosis was present along with balloon degeneration of keratinocytes, herpetic viral inclusions, and multinucleated giant cells. Viral lesions of molluscum contagiosum and human papillomavirus have been observed in benign skin proliferations. Nevertheless, we were unable to find descriptions of herpesvirus involvement in seborrheic keratosis in a medline search. Necrotic seborrheic keratoses should be carefully examined for the possibility of herpesvirus infection, a condition that may be improved by prompt medical intervention as demonstrated in one of our cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25376837601662
keywords = herpes, herpesvirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/137. adult-onset herpes simplex virus hepatitis with diffuse myofibroblastic transformation of hepatic stellate cells (Ito cells) in non-necrotic areas.

    The myofibroblastic transformation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC; also known as Ito cells) usually occurs following necrosis of adjacent liver cells. No report has previously found that such a transformation occurs in herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis. We present an autopsy case of HSV hepatitis with myofibroblastic transformation of HSC that is different from the usual transformation of HSC. The patient was a 66-year-old woman who had received various therapies for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. An autopsy revealed submassive hepatic necrosis with hemorrhage due to HSV hepatitis. HSV infection was confirmed by dna in situ hybridization in liver tissue. Immunohistochemical staining for alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) showed a strong positive reaction in almost all of the HSC in non-necrotic areas. However, in necrotic areas, the HSC were completely negative for ASMA. These findings indicate that not only liver cells but also HSC can become necrotic in HSV hepatitis. In contrast, in non-necrotic areas, almost all of the HSC showed active transformation to myofibroblasts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.20918741965068
keywords = herpes
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/137. Detection of cytomegalovirus infection in a patient with febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann's disease.

    BACKGROUND: Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann's disease (FUMHD) is a severe and very rare variant of pityriasis lichenoides et varilioformis acuta, which is characterized by large coalescing, and ulceronecrotic maculopapules or plaques. Morphological changes of the skin accompanied by persistent high fever and several constitutional symptoms have suggested virus infection in patients with FUMHD. However, the available information of viral origin is limited. In this study we investigated the relationship of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), type I human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I), and parvovirus B19 (PVB19) with FUMHD in a Taiwanese patient. methods: The existence of CMV, EBV, HHV8, HTLV-I, and PVB19 was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The presence of CMV in the endothelial cells was characterized by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS: Serologic immunoglobulin to CMV and IHC identification of CMV late gene in the biopsy specimen indicated that the patient was infected with CMV. Detection of CMV was confirmed by PCR and ISH. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that FUMHD is associated with dermal CMV manifestation. Nonetheless, the induction mechanism of FUMHD with CMV infection has yet to be determined.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.063442094004154
keywords = herpes, herpesvirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Necrosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.