Cases reported "Necrosis"

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1/274. Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland with extensive tumor necrosis: a case report.

    Hurthle cell neoplasm of the thyroid gland is rarely associated with tumor necrosis. We report a case of Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland with extensive necrosis. An 82-year-old man had had a right neck mass for more than 10 years. Approximately two to three weeks before he was hospitalized, this neck mass became progressively enlarged. An 131I scan could not demonstrate the right lobe of the thyroid gland, while the contralateral lobe was unremarkable. A 99mTc-sestamibi scan showed increased uptake on the lesion side. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed necrosis with macrophages in the initial aspirate, and the secondary aspirate appeared suspicious for a Hurthle cell tumor. The patient had a total thyroidectomy, and the pathology proved to be Hurthle cell carcinoma with tumor necrosis.
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keywords = macrophage
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2/274. Sickle cell-like crisis and bone marrow necrosis associated with parvovirus B19 infection and heterozygosity for haemoglobins S and E.

    In the literature, heterozygosity for haemoglobins S and E is known as a clinically benign condition. Nevertheless, we present a case of double heterozygosity manifesting as an infarctive sickle cell-like crisis with acute chest syndrome and reversible bone marrow necrosis. Importantly, these complications were associated with serologically documented parvovirus B19 infection. Reviewing the literature, this case emphasizes a specific role of parvovirus B19 as a precipitating cause. Furthermore, it demonstrates how important the consideration of haemoglobin disorders can be even outside of the historically known areas.
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keywords = bone
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3/274. Differential diagnosis of metastases in bone scans: chemotherapy induced bone necrosis.

    AIM: Influenced by the incorrect diagnosis of a bone metastasis caused by bone necrosis we evaluated reasons and frequency of bone necrosis in patients referred for bone scanning in follow-up of tumors. methods: Bone scans performed within two years on patients with primary bone tumors or tumors metastatic to bone were reviewed in respect to the final diagnosis bone necrosis. RESULTS: We found the cases of three young patients who presented the appearance of hot spots on bone scintigrams which were finally diagnosed as bone necrosis. In two cases the diagnosis was based on histological findings, in one case the diagnosis was made evident by follow-up. All the three patients had been treated by chemotherapy and presented no other reason for the development of bone necrosis. Enhanced tracer uptake in all sites decreased within eight weeks up to two years without therapy. CONCLUSION: Single and multiple hot spots after chemotherapy may be originated by bone necrosis but mimicry metastases.
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ranking = 0.32903218328117
keywords = bone
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4/274. Bilateral basal ganglial necrosis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in a child with Kostmann syndrome.

    A 6-year-old girl underwent allogeneic BMT from a matched sibling donor for the treatment of Kostmann syndrome. She suddenly became drowsy on day 30 after BMT, and lost consciousness 2 days later. Cranial CT scan showed symmetrical lesions suggesting bilateral necrosis in the basal ganglia. Clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any evidence of neurometabolic disease.
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ranking = 0.069269933322351
keywords = bone
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5/274. Bone marrow metastases in disseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: case report with ultrastructural study and review.

    A case of desseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in an 18-year-old male with leuco-erythroblastic anaemia is described. Numerous bizarre malignant cells, including frequent multinucleated giant cells, were seen in bone marrow aspirates, and osteolytic lesions appeared late in the clinical course. The primary site of the neoplasm remained undertermined during life and also at necropsy, which revealed minute pulmonary metastases and extensive lymph nodal, pleural and skeletal deposits. The diagnosis was confirmed on necropsy tissue by ultrastructural examination which demonstrated numerous thin (5 nm) and thick (15 nm) intracytoplasmic filaments in tumour cells, sometimes organized in bundles; scattered dense Z-band-like bodies, and rod-shaped structures were also seen. The fine structure of the rhabdomyosarcoma in the present case is compared with previous ultrastructural studies. Elongated, thick intracytoplasmic filaments whose diameter corresponds to that of myosin myofilaments are strong evidence for rhabdomyoblastic differentiation and are considered to be the sine qua non of a positive electron microscopic diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. Orgaized bundles of filaments and Z-band-like dense bodies are usually present, and rod-shaped structures are found infrequently, but none of these are necessary for the ultrastructural diagnosis.
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ranking = 0.017317483330588
keywords = bone
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6/274. A simple reconstructive procedure for radiation-induced necrosis of the external auditory canal.

    Localized necrosis of the bone, cartilage, and soft tissue of the external auditory canal is an uncommon side effect of radiotherapy to the parotid region. Five patients developed late onset skin necrosis of a quadrant of the ear canal secondary to an underlying osteoradionecrosis of the tympanic ring. We report a one-stage procedure to excise the necrotic tissue and replace it with a local rotational flap derived from the post-auricular skin. Otological side effects of radiotherapy are discussed.
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keywords = bone
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7/274. Tissue necrosis after subgingival irrigation with fluoride solution.

    Irrigation of periodontal pockets with fluoride solution after scaling and root planing is occasionally recommended to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria in the periodontal pocket. At the same time, irrigation enables mechanical removal of loosely adhering plaque and debris. Due to its toxicity, fluoride solution deposited in the periodontium may lead to tissue damage. We report in this paper, a case of extensive periodontal tissue necrosis and permanent loss of alveolar bone after irrigation of periodontal pockets with stannous fluoride solution. The literature on the toxic effects of fluoride on the local tissues is briefly reviewed and arguments for a re-evaluation of the use of stannous fluoride for pocket irrigation are provided.
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keywords = bone
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8/274. enzyme therapy in gaucher disease type 2: an autopsy case.

    A Japanese patient with gaucher disease type 2 was treated with enzyme therapy, alglucerase, from 7 to 22 months of age. Whereas hematologic parameters were normalized and hepatosplenomegaly was alleviated, no improvement in neurologic symptoms occurred, and the patient died of respiratory failure at age 22 months. Postmortem examination revealed massive intra-alveolar infiltration of Gaucher cells in lungs and in the central nervous system, i.e., the presence of Gaucher cells in the perivascular Virchow-Robins spaces in the cortex and deep white matter and extensive lamilar necrosis with reactive proliferation of blood vessels and macrophage infiltration of the cerebral cortex. It is suggested that enzyme therapy, with thus far recommended dose, does not prevent long-term respiratory and central nervous system involvement in severe varients of Gaucher disease.
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keywords = macrophage
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9/274. Reduced size of liquefaction necrosis of mitral annular calcification in chronic renal failure by using low calcium concentration hemodialysis.

    A report is presented of a liquefaction necrosis of mitral annular calcification in a patient with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who had been managed by hemodialysis for 11 years. The mass was echogenic with an echo-lucent area inside, high density on computed tomography and low intensity on magnetic resonance imaging. The uptake of gallium-67 (67Ga)-citrate and the bone agent technetium-99m-methylene diphosphate (99mTc-MDP) was seen in the mass. These findings were compatible with liquefaction necrosis of the mitral annular calcification. After treatment with low calcium concentration hemodialysis, the size of the mass reduced with disappearance of the echo-lucent area on the echocardiography and there was no uptake of 67Ga-citrate or 99mTc-MDP. Liquefaction necrosis might be the early and reversible form of mitral annular calcification. When a tumorlike echogenic mass at the base of mitral leaflets is seen in patients with predisposing factors for mitral annular calcification, consider the possibility of this specific form of mitral annular calcification in order to avoid any unnecessary surgical intervention.
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ranking = 0.017317483330588
keywords = bone
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10/274. Computed tomography guidance in bone marrow aspiration for diagnosis of marrow necrosis and metastasis.

    Bone marrow necrosis is most frequently diagnosed at postmortem examination. Antemortem diagnosis is still uncommon. We illustrate four cases where initial bedside attempts at needle aspiration and biopsy of primary and metastatic tumor tissue from the sternum were complicated by inadequate specimen retrieval secondary to marrow necrosis and/or tissue destruction by tumor. In these cases, CT guidance was useful in the precise localization of the bulk of the tissue mass and consequently the successful retrieval of adequate diagnostic specimens. We demonstrate CT guidance as an excellent and convenient alternative in circumstances where adequate marrow aspirations and biopsies are difficult and complicated.
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ranking = 0.069269933322351
keywords = bone
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