Cases reported "Neisseriaceae Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/17. Moraxella catarrhalis endocarditis: report of a case and literature review.

    A 53-year-old man developed severe acute systemic illness three weeks after an upper respiratory tract infection. Serial blood cultures grew Moraxella catarrhalis. During antibiotic treatment, fever and infectious parameters disappeared, but severe aortic regurgitation developed. aortic valve replacement was performed, during which extensive destruction of the aortic valve was noted. endocarditis due to M. catarrhalis is very rare with, to our knowledge, only six cases having been reported to date. M. catarrhalis is a normal commensal of the upper respiratory tract, but in unpredictable circumstances can become an important pathogen. bacteremia due to this organism therefore requires prompt treatment, as serious organ complications, including endocarditis, can occur.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/17. kingella kingae infections in children.

    OBJECTIVE: To increase awareness of kingella kingae infections in children by presenting four cases seen at the gold Coast Hospital, Southport, queensland, and reviewing the literature. METHODOLOGY: Records of the four cases were reviewed and relevant information described. A medline search of the English literature from 1983 to 1998 was conducted. RESULTS: Osteoarticular infections are the commonest type of invasive paediatric infection but bacteraemia and endocarditis also occur. Isolation of the organism is difficult but inoculation of the specimen into enriched blood culture systems improves the recovery rate. The majority of isolates are sensitive to beta-lactam antibiotics but resistance has been described. CONCLUSIONS: kingella kingae infections in children are more common than previously recognized. The organism should be actively sought in any child with suspected osteoarticular infections. Recommended empiric therapy is a third generation cephalosporin until susceptibility to penicillin is confirmed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/17. bacteremia due to Moraxella atlantae in a cancer patient.

    A gram-negative alkaline phosphatase- and pyrrolidone peptidase-positive rod-shaped bacterium (CCUG 45702) was isolated from two aerobic blood cultures from a female cancer patient. No identification could be reached using phenotypic techniques. Amplification of the tRNA intergenic spacers revealed fragments with lengths of 116, 133, and 270 bp, but no such pattern was present in our reference library. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed its identity as Moraxella atlantae, a species isolated only rarely and published only once as causing infection. In retrospect, the phenotypic characteristics fit the identification as M. atlantae (formerly known as CDC group M-3). Comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis indicates that M. atlantae, M. lincolnii, and M. osloensis might constitute three separate genera within the moraxellaceae: After treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for 2 days, fever subsided and the patient was dismissed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/17. Infective discitis with neisseria sicca/subflava in a previously healthy adult.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of neisseria sicca/subflava discitis in a healthy elderly female. OBJECTIVE: To report a rare case, which is usually seen exclusively in children. SETTING: Stoke on Trent, england. METHOD: Case report, a 65-year-old female with a 6 month history of back and bilateral leg pain. x-rays showed collapse of L4/5 disc. No neurological deficit. magnetic resonance imaging supported the clinical suspicion of discitis. Percutaneous biopsy followed 2 weeks later by open biopsy with bilateral root decompression was performed. culture of L4/5 disc tissue produced neisseria sicca/subflava. The patient was treated with a 4-week course of intravenous amoxycillin. Follow-up at 3 months confirmed clinical resolution of original symptoms. CONCLUSION: Any organism cultured from biopsy needs to be interpreted within the context of the clinical case. If clinical suspicion is high, further weight must be added to the finding of unusual or environmental organisms and culture of a repeat aspirate or biopsy may clarify the significance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/17. osteomyelitis/septic arthritis caused by kingella kingae among day care attendees--minnesota, 2003.

    kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus that colonizes the respiratory and oropharyngeal tract in children. K. kingae occasionally causes invasive disease, primarily osteomyelitis/septic arthritis in young children, bacteremia in infants, and endocarditis in school-aged children and adults. Although diagnosis of this organism frequently is missed, invasive disease is uncommon. Only sporadic, non-epidemiologically linked cases have been reported previously. In October 2003, the minnesota Department of health (MDH) investigated a cluster of two confirmed cases and one probable case of osteomyelitis/septic arthritis caused by K. kingae among children aged 17-21 months attending the same toddler classroom in a day care center. All reported within the same week with onset of fever, preceding or concurrent upper respiratory illness (URI), and refusal to bear weight on the affected limb. This report summarizes these cases and describes the epidemiologic investigation of the day care center. The findings underscore the need for clinicians and laboratorians to consider K. kingae infection in young children with Gram stain--negative or culture-negative skeletal infections.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/17. Infective endocarditis due to neisseria sicca and associated with intravenous drug abuse.

    Intravenous drug abusers are subject to infective endocarditis from unusual pathogens, including the saprophytic species of Neisseria, sometimes transmitted by needles contaminated with oral secretions. We have recently encountered such a case, in which a 37-year-old man with vegetations on the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve had blood cultures positive for N sicca. A history of intravenous drug abuse using needles contaminated with oral secretions should alert clinicians to the possibility of infective endocarditis due to saprophytic Neisseria species.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/17. Vasculitic purpura with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive acute renal failure in a patient with streptococcus bovis case and Neisseria subflava bacteremia and subacute endocarditis.

    Subacute bacterial endocarditis is frequently associated with extracardiac manifestations and renal failure. Clinical variety of endocarditis manifestation is wide and has the potential to mimic vasculitis. Whereas streptococcus bovis is often isolated and associated with colonic tumors, neisseriaceae are rarely found. An association of subacute bacterial endocarditis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies has been described. We report on a 62-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with acute oliguric renal failure and a nonpruritic purpural rush without fever. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody diagnostic revealed perinuclear staining with a titre of 1 : 512 and antiproteinase-3 specificity. Immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis without extracapillary proliferation was diagnosed in renal biopsy. Finally, blood cultures became positive for streptococcus bovis and Neisseria flava. echocardiography showed mobile vegetations on tricuspid valve. Under treatment with penicillin g and gentamicin, skin efflorescences and renal function recovered, but vegetations increased. A colonic tumor could be excluded, a disastrous dental status may have been a predisposal factor. When classical findings of subacute bacterial endocarditis are less clear, the presence of renal failure and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in absence of fever may lead to misdiagnosis and deleterious immunosuppressive therapy. Neisseria subflava, an upper respiratory tract commensal, may cause subacute bacterial endocarditis without typical symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/17. endocarditis due to a new rod-shaped Neisseria sp.

    We report the first case of pacemaker endocarditis due to a new rod-shaped Neisseria sp. isolated from blood culture. On the basis of rrs sequencing, the isolate was found to be most closely related to an uncultured organism from human subgingival plaque and was identified as Neisseria sp. group AK105. A cure was achieved after a combination of surgical and antibiotic treatment. Oral flora-induced pacemaker endocarditis is a rare condition that reinforces the need for good oral hygiene as an important preventive measure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/17. neisseria sicca endocarditis with embolic phenomena.

    Two patients with poor oral hygiene developed neisseria sicca endocarditis, one after probable intravenous drug abuse and staphylococcus aureus endocarditis and the other after a periodontal surgical procedure. Both experienced significant embolic phenomena and both required 6 or more weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy. The diagnosis of N. sicca endocarditis must be considered when this organism is isolated from blood cultures in patients with emboli.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/17. Outbreak of osteomyelitis/septic arthritis caused by kingella kingae among child care center attendees.

    OBJECTIVE: kingella kingae often colonizes the oropharyngeal and respiratory tracts of children but infrequently causes invasive disease. In mid-October 2003, 2 confirmed and 1 probable case of K kingae osteomyelitis/septic arthritis occurred among children in the same 16- to 24-month-old toddler classroom of a child care center. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of K kingae colonization and invasive disease among child care attendees. methods: Staff at the center were interviewed, and a site visit was performed. Oropharyngeal cultures were obtained from the staff and children aged 0 to 5 years to assess the prevalence of Kingella colonization. Bacterial isolates were subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and dna sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed. A telephone survey inquiring about potential risk factors and the general health of each child was also conducted. All children and staff in the affected toddler classroom were given rifampin prophylaxis and recultured 10 to 14 days later. For epidemiologic and microbiologic comparison, oropharyngeal cultures were obtained from a cohort of children at a control child care center with similar demographics and were analyzed using the same laboratory methods. The main outcome measures were prevalence and risk factors for colonization and invasive disease and comparison of bacterial isolates by molecular subtyping and dna sequencing. RESULTS: The 2 confirmed case patients required hospitalization, surgical debridement, and intravenous antibiotic therapy. The probable case patient was initially misdiagnosed; MRI 16 days later revealed evidence of ankle osteomyelitis. The site visit revealed no obvious outbreak source. Of 122 children in the center, 115 (94%) were cultured. Fifteen (13%) were colonized with K kingae, with the highest prevalence in the affected toddler classroom (9 [45%] of 20 children; all case patients tested negative but had received antibiotics). Six colonized children were distributed among the older classrooms; 2 were siblings of colonized toddlers. No staff (n = 28) or children aged <16 months were colonized. Isolates from the 2 confirmed case patients and from the colonized children had an indistinguishable PFGE pattern. No risk factors for invasive disease or colonization were identified from the telephone survey. Of the 9 colonized toddlers who took rifampin, 3 (33%) remained positive on reculture; an additional toddler, initially negative, was positive on reculture. The children of the control child care center demonstrated a similar degree and distribution of K kingae colonization; of 118 potential subjects, 45 (38%) underwent oropharyngeal culture, and 7 (16%) were colonized with K kingae. The highest prevalence again occurred in the toddler classrooms. All 7 isolates from the control facility had an indistinguishable PFGE pattern; this pattern differed from the PFGE pattern observed from the outbreak center isolates. 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that the outbreak K kingae strain exhibited >98% homology to the ATCC-type strain, although several sequence deviations were present. Sequencing of the control center strain demonstrated more homology to the outbreak center strain than to the ATCC-type strain. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first reported outbreak of invasive K kingae disease. The high prevalence in the affected toddler class and the matching PFGE pattern are consistent with child-to-child transmission within the child care center. rifampin was modestly effective in eliminating carriage. dna sequence analysis suggests that there may be considerable variability within the species K kingae and that different K kingae strains may demonstrate varying degrees of pathogenicity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Neisseriaceae Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.