Cases reported "Neoplasm Metastasis"

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1/508. A case of metastasizing pleomorphic adenoma.

    The pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign salivary neoplasm. A case is presented in which a palatal pleomorphic adenoma seeded a metastasis in the medullary cavity of the anterior maxilla, apparently by hematogenous spread after surgical manipulation.
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keywords = neoplasm
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2/508. bone marrow metastases in disseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: case report with ultrastructural study and review.

    A case of desseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in an 18-year-old male with leuco-erythroblastic anaemia is described. Numerous bizarre malignant cells, including frequent multinucleated giant cells, were seen in bone marrow aspirates, and osteolytic lesions appeared late in the clinical course. The primary site of the neoplasm remained undertermined during life and also at necropsy, which revealed minute pulmonary metastases and extensive lymph nodal, pleural and skeletal deposits. The diagnosis was confirmed on necropsy tissue by ultrastructural examination which demonstrated numerous thin (5 nm) and thick (15 nm) intracytoplasmic filaments in tumour cells, sometimes organized in bundles; scattered dense Z-band-like bodies, and rod-shaped structures were also seen. The fine structure of the rhabdomyosarcoma in the present case is compared with previous ultrastructural studies. Elongated, thick intracytoplasmic filaments whose diameter corresponds to that of myosin myofilaments are strong evidence for rhabdomyoblastic differentiation and are considered to be the sine qua non of a positive electron microscopic diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. Orgaized bundles of filaments and Z-band-like dense bodies are usually present, and rod-shaped structures are found infrequently, but none of these are necessary for the ultrastructural diagnosis.
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3/508. Well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, gastric foveolar type, of the extrahepatic bile ducts: A previously unrecognized and distinctive morphologic variant of bile duct carcinoma.

    Two examples of a rare but distinctive morphologic variant of extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the extrahepatic bile ducts are reported. One tumor arose in the common bile duct of a 51-year-old man; the other arose in the common hepatic duct of a 27-year-old man. Both tumors were composed predominantly (>95%) of gastric foveolar-type epithelium. Because of their bland nuclear features, low mitotic index, and focal polypoid and lobular architecture, they were initially confused with adenomas. Foci of less-differentiated adenocarcinoma and perineural invasion present in the deep portions of the tumors facilitated recognition. The neoplastic cells and extracellular mucin were periodic acid-Schiff- and alcian blue-positive. By immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells expressed cytokeratins 8 and 20 as well as cathepsin d, as reported in normal foveolar cells. Likewise, p53 overexpression was documented immunohistochemically in both adenocarcinomas, which also stained with the Ki-67 antibody. Despite the well-differentiated nature of the neoplasms and their deceptively benign microscopic appearance, one patient developed recurrence and liver metastasis 5 years after surgery. The other patient is disease-free 2 years following a segmental resection of the common hepatic duct, cystic duct, and gallbladder. The cell phenotype of these tumors can be explained by the ability of the bile duct epithelium to differentiate along gastric cell lines.
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keywords = neoplasm
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4/508. Molecular assessment of clonality leads to the identification of a new germ line TP53 mutation associated with malignant cystosarcoma phyllodes and soft tissue sarcoma.

    Cystosarcoma phyllodes (CSP) is a rare breast neoplasm composed of stromal and epithelial elements. It usually runs a benign course but it may metastasize. In a 31-year-old patient with recurring CSP, a mesenchymal tumor in the leg developed. The question arose whether the latter tumor could be a metastasis from the CSP, which would have major treatment consequences. The problem was addressed using molecular methods, i.e., comparison of the pattern of polymorphic repeat markers on chromosome 17p as well as single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and sequencing of exons 5 to 8 of the TP53 gene in both tumor and normal tissue. An identical pattern of loss of heterozygosity in both breast tumors was demonstrated, but a different pattern was shown in the tumor in the leg. This led to the conclusion that the latter tumor had to be a new primary tumor. A mutation in codon 162 of the TP53 gene was found in the tumor tissue as well as in the normal tissue of this patient. This germ line mutation leads to the replacement of isoleucine by asparagine and most likely has functional consequences. In all four examined tumors of this patient, the normal TP53 allele was lost. This is strong evidence that this germ line TP53 mutation causes the genesis of these two rare primary mesenchymal tumors in this young patient. The current study exemplifies the power of molecular diagnostic methods in investigating the specific clinical problem of clonal relation between two separate tumors. The germ line mutation found in codon 162 of the TP53 gene and the association with cystosarcoma phyllodes have not been described previously.
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5/508. Mediastinal choriocarcinoma in a chromatin-positive boy.

    A case of primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma in a chromatin-positive boy is reported. The incidence of neoplasms in patients with so-called Klinefelter's syndrome is discussed as well as embryogenesis and diagnostic evaluation in patients presenting with this tumor.
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6/508. meningioma with sarcomatous change and hepatic metastasis.

    A 72-year-old patient had a meningotheliomatous meningioma that invaded through the skull and into temporalis muscle. One year following craniotomy for removal of the neoplasm, he developed headaches, diplopia, and proptosis of the left eye. biopsy of the orbital contents revealed a malignant supporting tissue neoplasm having a resemblance to the previous meningioma. No curative therapy was possible and the patient died 33 months after diagnosis. autopsy examination showed extensive residual intracranial neoplasm and a 3-cm metastasis in the liver. The metastatic tumor appeared similar to the meningioma and did not appear malignant histologically. The case illustrates the distinct histologic variations in meningiomas and the difficulties in predicting their biologic activity. Aggressive local behavior may indicate possible malignant areas in the neoplasm. Therefore, examination of the neoplasm should be thorough. Such a correlation may suggest malignant biologic potential.
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ranking = 5
keywords = neoplasm
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7/508. Pseudo sister mary joseph's nodule.

    The sister mary joseph's nodule is a significant finding in the physical examination. It is sometimes the only indication of an intra-abdominal metastatic malignancy. We report a patient who presented with an umbilical nodule that was discovered to be an omphalith. A review of the literature discusses the sister mary joseph's nodule and this unusual finding.
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ranking = 0.037038293285594
keywords = malignancy
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8/508. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis to follicular variant of papillary carcinoma of thyroid.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and document tumor-to-tumor metastases in the thyroid gland. methods AND RESULTS: In this series we describe 3 cases of tumor-to-tumor metastasis in which the recipient tumor was a follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The donor tumors and sites were small cell carcinoma of the lung, neuroendocrine carcinoma probably of pancreatic origin with initial presentation as liver metastasis, and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney with metastasis to liver and pancreas. The donor tumor cells infiltrated the substance of the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma, the nontumorous thyroid parenchyma, and the lymphovascular spaces. Small cell carcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma showed positive reactivity for neuroendocrine markers and were negative for thyroglobulin and calcitonin. The follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma showed positivity with thyroglobulin and cytokeratin 19. CONCLUSIONS: Although tumor-to-tumor metastases in thyroid gland are exceedingly rare, one should be aware of this phenomenon as the metastatic lesion may simulate a thyroid primary. history of a previous tumor and immunohistochemical stains can be helpful in distinguishing between primary and metastatic thyroid neoplasms.
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keywords = neoplasm
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9/508. Cutaneous lesions of metastatic visceral malignancy mimicking pyogenic granuloma.

    Cutaneous metastases may be the first sign of a previously undiagnosed visceral malignancy or the initial presentation of a recurrent neoplasm. Rarely, skin metastases can resemble a pyogenic granuloma. Three oncology patients who developed new pyogenic granuloma-like cutaneous lesions are described. Histopathologic examination showed metastatic visceral malignancy in the skin. The characteristics of the previously reported cancer patients with metastatic tumor to the skin that mimicked a pyogenic granuloma are reviewed. A biopsy of a skin lesion that clinically appears to represent a pyogenic granuloma should be performed for microscopic examination in patients with a previous visceral malignancy or in cancer-free individuals whose lesions do not resolve after conservative treatment.
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ranking = 1.2592680529992
keywords = neoplasm, malignancy
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10/508. Immunoreactivity of prostate-specific antigen in male breast carcinomas: two examples of a diagnostic pitfall in discriminating a primary breast cancer from metastatic prostate carcinoma.

    Prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) is regarded as a specific marker secreted by normal and neoplastic acinar epithelial cells of the prostate gland; its detection by immunocytochemistry has been accepted as an indication of metastatic prostate cancer. This is ascribed to the commonly held belief that PSA is not found in extraprostatic tissues. However, this concept has recently been challenged, based on the observations that certain nonprostatic tissues and their neoplasms can also secrete PSA. Such a questionable belief could result in a diagnostic pitfall when using immunostaining for PSA on fine-needle aspiration (FNAC) cytology samples to differentiate metastatic prostate cancer from a primary carcinoma of an extraprostatic organ. In this communication, two cases of primary carcinomas of the male breast are reported in which PSA immunopositivity on FNAC led to the suggestion of a diagnosis of metastatic carcinoma of the prostate. Diagn. Cytopathol. 1999;21:167-169.
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keywords = neoplasm
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