Cases reported "Neoplasms, Muscle Tissue"

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1/23. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the stomach with peritoneal dissemination in a young adult: imaging findings.

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are lesions that most often affect young adults and children. These tumors have been found in numerous extrapulmonary sites but rarely in the stomach. It is unknown whether this process is reactive or neoplastic. They are infiltrative lesions and often extend through the gastric wall, sometimes reaching adjacent organs including the esophagus, duodenum, peritoneal cavity, spleen. pancreas, and liver. These features mimic malignancy on endoscopy and radiology. We report the ultrasound, color Doppler ultrasound, and helical computed tomographic findings of a gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with peritoneal dissemination in a young adult. To our knowledge, this is the first report of color Doppler ultrasound and helical computed tomographic findings of this rare disease entity.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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2/23. Granular cell myoblastoma of the cervical trachea.

    Only five granular cell myoblastomas affecting the cervical trachea have been previously reported. Two of these tumors appear to be primary lesions of the trachea, while the remaining three appear to involve it only secondarily. We report a case of an intraluminal granular cell myoblastoma arising from the right tracheal wall in a 45-year-old woman. The tumor extended into the partition wall between trachea and esophagus. Treatment was by surgical excision of the tumor and the involved tracheal ring. The patient was free of recurrence one year after treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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3/23. Granular cell tumors of the esophagus.

    Three cases of granular cell tumor of the esophagus are added to the 17 previously reported in the literature. These tumors, thought to be of neural origin, are difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The diagnosis should be considered in adult females presenting with an intramural mass of the proximal or distal third of the esophagus. Symptoms of dysphagia and substernal discomfort are likely to occur with lesions greater than one centimeter in diameter. Preoperative biopsy is not advised as a mistaken diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma can result.
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ranking = 6
keywords = esophagus
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4/23. Multicentric tracheobronchial and oesophageal granular cell myoblastoma.

    Two patients with multiple intrathorcic granular cell myoblastomas are described. In one case multiple tumours were present in the major airways and oesophagus. The patient presented with recurrent pulmonary infections and stridor due to airway obstruction. In the other case dysphagia caused by multiple oesophageal granular cell myoblastomas was the major symptom. Granular cell myoblastoma is a rare tumour of neurogenic origin with a characteristic histological appearance. The pattern of multiple tracheobranchial and oesophageal tumours is uncommon and forms the basis of this report.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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5/23. granular cell tumor of the esophagus: endoscopic ultrasonographic demonstration and endoscopic removal.

    A 35-yr-old Japanese man with a granular cell tumor of the esophagus that was removed by endoscopic polypectomy is presented. radiography and endoscopy showed a 20 x 12 mm sessile protrusion in the distal esophagus. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated the hypoechoic mass in the submucosa without continuity to the muscularis propria. The lesion was successfully treated by endoscopic polypectomy without complications. The cross-sections of the resected specimen were quite in agreement with the ultrasonographic findings. Endoscopic ultrasonography is valuable to assess the exact location and extent of the tumor, and to determine the indication for endoscopic polypectomy.
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ranking = 6
keywords = esophagus
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6/23. Granular cell myoblastoma of the esophagus after irradiation for carcinoma.

    Granular cell myoblastoma is an uncommon, usually benign tumor. Only 20 cases are reported in the esophagus. We describe a 65-year-old woman who developed a granular cell myoblastoma of the postericoid esophagus in the area of a squamous cell carcinoma successfully treated with irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the 21st reported case, and the only case occurring in the esophagus after irradiation for primary squamous cell carcinoma.
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ranking = 7
keywords = esophagus
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7/23. Minute esophageal granular cell tumor: a case report with immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examination.

    A small granular cell tumor (GCT) of the esophagus, which developed in a 44-year-old Japanese man and was removed by endoscopic polypectomy, is presented. Histopathologically, the tumor, located in the submucosa, was composed of uniform neoplastic cells with nuclei and abundant round or oval cytoplasm containing eosinophilic granules. An immunohistochemical examination showed positive reactions with S-100 protein, especially the beta subunit, and neuron specific enolase in the neoplastic cells. Electron microscopic observation revealed abundant electron-dense or light granules and myelin-like structures in the cytoplasm. These findings support the concept that esophageal GCT is derived from schwann cells.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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8/23. granular cell tumor of the esophagus: natural history, diagnosis, and therapy.

    Five cases of granular cell tumor of the esophagus are reported. In four cases, the tumor was an asymptomatic, incidental finding. In one case, a larger granular cell tumor presented with dysphagia and required local surgical excision. Long-term follow-up in three cases revealed no evidence of tumor progression. Esophageal granular cell tumors are benign lesions which can frequently be diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy. Asymptomatic, smaller lesions require observation only. Larger, symptomatic lesions can be treated with local surgical excision.
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ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
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9/23. granular cell tumor of the esophagus.

    granular cell tumor (GCT) of the esophagus is a rarely-met-with neoplasm. It is almost invariably benign in character and is of still-disputed histogenesis. Small lesions are asymptomatic. Those over 1 cm in diameter may be accompanied by painful swallowing or retrosternal discomfort. Local resection is the treatment of choice for lesions that are accompanied by symptoms, or that are larger than 1 cm. A tumor incidentally encountered in an asymptomatic patient may be safely followed endoscopically. A successful endoscopic removal of such a lesion is described.
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ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
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10/23. granular cell tumor of the proximal esophagus. A rare disease.

    In 1926, Abrikossoff described a tumor, usually benign, which only rarely appears in the esophagus. In a 40-year-old woman, the authors found a multicentric granular cell tumor which was localized in the cervical esophagus and in the subcutaneous tissues over the right scapula; it was removed surgically. Granular cell tumors causing stenosis of the upper esophagus have been described only four times in the literature. Characteristics and treatment are discussed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = esophagus
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