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1/439. Intra-abdominal angiosarcomatosis after radiotherapy.

    BACKGROUND: We report a case of a 61-year-old Japanese woman who developed intra-abdominal angiosarcomatosis 20 years after receiving radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. methods AND RESULTS: The surgically resected portion of the ileum showed diffuse proliferating angiosarcoma, with irregular channels lined by atypical vascular endothelial cells. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the tumour cells were positive for factor viii-related antigen and ulex europaeus agglutinin 1. At autopsy, the tumour had disseminated to the peritoneum and invaded into the right thoracic cavity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings were compatible with radiation-induced angiosarcomatosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = radiation-induced
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2/439. Increased risk of lymphoma in sicca syndrome.

    The risk of cancer was ascertained in 136 women with sicca syndrome followed at the National Institutes of health (NIH). Seven patients developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma from 6 months to 13 years after their first admission to NIH. This was 43.8 times (P less than 0.01) the incidence expected from the rates of cancer prevailing among women of the same age range in the general population during this time. In addition, three cases of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia occurred in this study group. Eight patients developed cancers other than lymphoma, similar to the number expected based on the rates prevailing in the general population. patients with a history of parotid enlargement, splenomegaly, and lymphadenopahy had an increased risk of lymphoma. These clinical conditions did not appear to be early manifestations of undiagnosed lymphoma but rather seemed to identify a subgroup of patients with sicca syndrome with marked lymphoid reactivity, who had a particularly high risk of subsequently developing lymphoma.
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ranking = 0.00024362308303065
keywords = cancer
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3/439. radiation-induced esophageal carcinoma 30 years after mediastinal irradiation: case report and review of the literature.

    A 54-year-old man who had been irradiated in 1964 for cervical involvement by Hodgkin's disease was admitted in December 1994 to our clinic with strong complaints of dysphagia. The reason was a moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the proximal esophagus in the previously irradiated region. The patient had no risk factors (abuse of nicotine or alcohol) for the developement of esophageal carcinoma. A reirradiation was performed, but the disease progressed locally and two weeks after the beginning of the therapy the patient developed two tracheoesophagocutaneous fistulae. The radiation therapy was discontinued and the tumor stenosis was bridged by a tube closing the fistulae. A retrospective dose analysis to evaluate the applied doses will be performed. Furthermore, an overview of 66 cases of the literature with radiation-induced esophageal carcinoma analysed concerning applied dose and latent interval will be given. In conclusion the reported case fits the criteria for radiation-induced malignancies (Chudecki Br J Radiol 1972;45:303-4) known from literature: (1) a history of previous irradiation, (2) a cancer occurring within the irradiated area, (3) gross tissue damage due to an excessive dose of radiation, and (4) a long latent interval between irradiation and development of cancer. Esophageal carcinomas belong to the rare secondary malignancies after the therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. Nevertheless in patients with dysphagia they should be suspected as a differential diagnosis even many years after mediastinal irradiation. The treatment of these tumors is very difficult and is associated with a poor prognosis.
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ranking = 2.0001624153887
keywords = radiation-induced, cancer
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4/439. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma: collaborative series review and update.

    BACKGROUND: Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC) is a malignant appendageal tumor first described in 1982. It can be clinically and histologically confused with other malignant and benign cutaneous neoplasms, leading to inadequate initial treatment. This neoplasm is locally aggressive and deeply infiltrating, characterized by high morbidity and frequent recurrence. Mohs micrographic surgery has been used to conserve tissue and improve the likelihood for cure. OBJECTIVE: We report our experience using Mohs micrographic surgery for the treatment of MAC and compare with earlier reports in the literature. In addition, we review the epidemiology, clinical and histologic characteristics, and optimal treatment of this rare neoplasm. We also describe a 15-year-old white male patient with MAC on the scalp occurring only 7 years after radiation exposure. methods: The medical records of 11 patients with MAC who were treated by Mohs micrographic surgery were reviewed at both departments, and follow-up data were obtained. RESULTS: In all patients treated with Mohs micrographic surgery, there were no recurrences after a mean follow-up of 5 years. CONCLUSION: Mohs technique enables the detection of clinically unrecognizable tumor spread and perineural invasion often encountered with MAC. Aggressive initial treatment by microscopically controlled excision appears to offer the greatest likelihood of cure for this neoplasm, while providing conservation of normal tissue. In addition, we describe the second youngest patient with MAC and readdress the issue of previous radiotherapy as an important predisposing factor.
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ranking = 0.00051308845306886
keywords = neoplasm
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5/439. temporal bone tumours in patients irradiated for nasopharyngeal neoplasm.

    radiation-associated tumours are rare complications of radiotherapy. This study seeks to highlight and discuss the clinically challenging problem of radiation-associated tumours (rats) in the temporal bones of seven patients previously irradiated for nasopharyngeal neoplasm. Seven patients (six males and one female) with radiation-associated temporal bone tumours are presented (five squamous cell carcinomas, one osteogenic sarcoma and one chondrosarcoma). The initial nasopharyngeal disease for which radiotherapy was indicated was nasopharyngeal carcinoma (six patients) and nasopharyngeal lymphoma (one patient). The latency period between radiotherapy and presentation of temporal bone tumours ranged from five years to 30 years with a mean of 12.9 years. All the patients underwent surgical tumour resection. Three patients had post-operative radiotherapy and one patient underwent pre- and post-operative chemotherapy. Two patients died from the disease within three months of treatment with one patient surviving 36 months at the time of writing. One patient died from an unrelated medical condition three months after surgery. With refinement in radiotherapy techniques and the resultant increase in patient survival, there may be more patients with radiation-associated tumours in the future. It remains imperative for clinicians to be vigilant when patients previously irradiated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma present with otological symptoms as the key to the successful management of this condition lies in the early detection and expedient treatment of this difficult disease.
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ranking = 0.00064136056633608
keywords = neoplasm
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6/439. radiation-associated rectal cancer: report of four cases.

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: radiation-associated rectal cancer is a remarkable clinical entity. We demonstrate 4 patients (mean age 68 years, range 63-74) who had undergone pelvic radiotherapy for cervical cancer. We indicate some characteristics of radiation-associated rectal cancer. RESULTS: Two patients had received intracavitary and external pelvic radiotherapy, while the remaining 2 had external pelvic radiotherapy following hysterectomy. The mean total radiation dose was 63 Gy, though radiation dose information was not available for 1 patient. Colorectal cancer developed at a mean time of 20.7 years (range 11-30) after radiation therapy. All patients presented with chronic radiation colitis, and 3 demonstrated abnormal tumor markers. colonoscopy revealed an ulcerative, localized well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the rectosigmoid colon in 1 patient, and diffusely infiltrating cancers of the lower rectum, one signet-ring cell carcinoma and two mucinous carcinomas in the remaining 3. One case was stage I, 2 were stage IIIa, and the remaining case was stage IV. Three patients underwent abdominoperineal resection. The remaining patient was felt to be inoperable. The colorectal wall demonstrated the changes of chronic radiation injury. Two patients died within a short time because of their advanced cancers. CONCLUSION: radiation-associated rectal cancer has a tendency to be diagnosed in the advanced stage and to have a poor prognosis. A literature review and our case report suggest that since there are no reliable clinical or laboratory indicators of the presence of a curable colorectal cancer in the setting of chronic radiation proctocolitis, surveillance with a colonoscope should be done 10 years after irradiation in patients with previous pelvic radiotherapy.
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ranking = 0.00097449233212261
keywords = cancer
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7/439. meningioma after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    The most common second primary tumors after treatment of childhood Hodgkin's disease are leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and thyroid cancer. Although intracranial meningioma has been reported after radiotherapy to the scalp for benign conditions and for intracranial primary brain tumors, this appears to be an extremely rare sequelae of treatment for Hodgkin's disease. The authors describe a 15-year-old boy who underwent radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and in whom a meningioma developed in the posterior fossa 27 years later.
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ranking = 0.0001624153886871
keywords = cancer
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8/439. Myelodysplastic syndrome as a complication of neo-adjuvant triple M chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    Cases of myelodysplastic syndrome occurring after multi-drug chemotherapy are rare; they are more often associated with the use of alkylating agents. We report the case history of a patient with myelodyspasia occurring after neoadjuvant methotrexate, mitoxantrone and mitomycin C (triple M) chemotherapy with subsequent radiotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer. cytogenetic analysis of a bone marrow biopsy confirmed the typical chromosomal abnormalities associated with therapy related myelodysplasia. Few treatments for this disorder have been found to be of value. The aetiology, incidence and management options are briefly discussed.
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ranking = 8.120769434355E-5
keywords = cancer
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9/439. Pancreatic cancer in a young adult after treatment for Hodgkin's disease.

    The authors present a case of adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas, which arose 14 years after extended field irradiation for Stage IIA Hodgkin's disease. The patient was aged 37 years at the time of the pancreatic cancer, which was situated within the previously irradiated volume.
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ranking = 0.00040603847171775
keywords = cancer
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10/439. Postradiation neural sheath sarcoma of the brachial plexus: a case report.

    Sarcoma arising in the brachial plexus is a rare complication following radiation therapy, with only 7 patients reported in the literature. The absolute number of patients is likely to increase with the growth of radiation therapy to treat breast cancer. Because of its rarity, early diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion. We present a patient with neural sheath sarcoma of the brachial plexus arising 18 years after external beam radiation for breast cancer. The interval between presentation and definitive therapy was prolonged by workup and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome and cervical nerve root compression. The English language literature regarding postradiation sarcoma is reviewed and the clinical, radiological, and electrophysiological workup of postradiation brachial plexopathy is discussed.
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ranking = 0.0001624153886871
keywords = cancer
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