Cases reported "Neoplasms, Second Primary"

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1/35. Giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus.

    Giant fibrovascular polyps (FVP) are the most common intraluminal tumors of the esophagus. The case of a second, nonrecurrent FVP is presented. A thorough review of the literature was conducted to provide an informative discussion on this benign but potentially life-threatening neoplasm.
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keywords = esophagus
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2/35. Second primary Barrett's adenocarcinoma after 19 years.

    Because long survival after resection of esophageal carcinoma is uncommon, second esophageal cancers are rare. We report the case of a patient in whom adenocarcinoma developed within residual Barrett's esophagus 19 years after esophagectomy for stage IIb Barrett's adenocarcinoma. Implications relative to the type of operation and adequacy of resection are discussed. Long-term survival after Barrett's adenocarcinoma may occur more often if surveillance protocols achieve their aim. Questions concerning the management of such patients are identified.
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keywords = esophagus
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3/35. Thoracic esophagectomy combined with pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy in a one-stage procedure: report of a case.

    We present herein the case of a patient who underwent a thoracic esophagectomy and pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy in a one-stage procedure for synchronous double primary cancer of the thoracic esophagus and the head of the pancreas (intraductal papillary tumor). To reconstruct the upper alimentary tract with the stomach, the gastroduodenal artery and right gastroepiploic vein were successfully skeletonized and preserved. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient is currently well, 5 years after surgery.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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4/35. Rapid-growing carcinosarcoma of the esophagus arising from intraepithelial squamous cell carcinoma: report of a case.

    A case of carcinosarcoma arising from the intraepithelial spreading area of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is reported herein. A 64-year-old man was referred to our hospital for investigation of a sore throat and dysphagia. An endoscopic examination revealed a 2. 5-cm polypoid mass in the mid-esophagus. Esophagograms taken 1 month prior to consultation by our hospital and just before surgery revealed marked change within a period of less than 2 months from a 2-cm sessile elevated mass to a 4-cm polypoid mass with a lobular appearance. The resected specimen contained two lesions in the esophagus. The larger one measured 4.0 x 2.0 x 2.0 cm and had a pedunculated polypoid shape, while the smaller one, measuring 1 cm in diameter, was a plateau-type elevated lesion located 3 cm distal from the larger mass. Histologically, the distal smaller lesion was diagnosed as primary SCC associated with a high frequency of intraepithelial spread, while the larger polypoid mass was composed of spindle-shaped sarcomatous cells, arising from the intraepithelial spread of SCC. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of esophageal carcinosarcoma arising from an area of intraepithelial spread of SCC that showed such surprisingly rapid growth.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = esophagus
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5/35. Esophageal collision tumor (Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and papillary carcinoma) arising in a barrett esophagus.

    We report herein a unique case of an esophageal collision tumor composed of a papillary adenocarcinoma and a large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in a barrett esophagus. hematoxylin-eosin and silver staining patterns, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy of the large cell neuroendocrine component are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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6/35. Metachronous triple cancers of the sigmoid colon, stomach, and esophagus: report of a case.

    We report herein an unusual case of metachronous triple cancers of the sigmoid colon, stomach, and esophagus. A 60-year-old man was initially admitted to our hospital for investigation of occult fecal blood. This was found to be caused by sigmoid colon cancer which was resected in July 1985 (T3, N0, M0; Stage II). A follow-up endoscopy performed in 1990 showed early gastric cancer, and a gastrectomy was performed in August 1990 (Tis, N0, M0; Stage 0). Another endoscopic examination performed as follow-up in 1993 revealed early cancer of the remnant stomach, and all the remnant stomach was surgically resected in March 1993 (Tis, N0, M0; Stage 0). He presented again in December 1996, complaining of discomfort in the chest which was found to be caused by cancer of the middle thoracic esophagus. Although surgery was considered necessary, the patient refused to undergo any further operations. Instead, radiation was administered from January 1997. An endoscopy after the completion of radiotherapy confirmed that the cancer had almost disappeared; however, it started to grow again from the beginning of 1998. He was hospitalized due to esophageal stenosis in April 1998, and died of carcinomatous cachexia in September of the same year.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = esophagus
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7/35. Esophageal leiomyomatosis in a woman with a history of vulvar leiomyoma and Barrett's esophagus: a case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and treatment of esophageal pathology remains a challenge despite advances in preoperative endoscopy, radiographic staging, and perioperative care. CASE REPORT: In this article, we present an interesting case of esophageal leiomyomatosis in a woman with a history of vulvar leiomyoma and Barrett's esophagus. This paper represents the first reported simultaneous occurrence of these three pathologic entities in the English literature. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation and characteristic pathologic findings in patients with esophageal leiomyomatosis are reviewed. Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to esophageal masses are discussed including the indications for esophageal resection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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8/35. radiation-induced gastrointestinal stromal sarcoma of the esophagus.

    Esophageal sarcoma is an uncommon tumor, sporadically reported in the literature. radiation therapy is frequently employed in the treatment of carcinoma of the esophagus, and the increased risk of development of sarcoma arising in irradiated fields is well known. However, to our knowledge, the occurrence of radiation-associated sarcoma of the esophagus after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the esophagus has not been reported. We therefore report the case of a 43-year-old female who developed a gastrointestinal stroma sarcoma 9 years following radiation therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent resection of her gastrointestinal stromal sarcoma by transhiatal esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis and is doing well 18 months later. The increasing use of radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma suggests that radiation-associated sarcoma of the esophagus may be seen more frequently in the future.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = esophagus
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9/35. Quintuple carcinomas with metachronous triple cancer of the esophagus, kidney, and colonic conduit following synchronous double cancer of the stomach and duodenum.

    A patient who had undergone radical gastrectomy for synchronous gastric cancer (T(1)N(0)M(0), stage I) and duodenal cancer (Tis, stage 0) in November 1987 was found to have esophageal cancer in November 1994, and underwent radical thoracolaparotomy at our hospital (T(1)N(0)M(0), stage I). After follow-up for about 3.5 years, renal cancer was detected in April 1998, and radical nephrectomy was performed (T(1)N(0)M(0), stage I). Two years later, in April 2000, the patient was found to have a polypoid lesion in the colonic conduit used for reconstruction after esophagectomy, and endoscopic mucosal resection was performed (Tis, stage 0). The patient remains under careful follow-up, including observation of the colonic conduit and the residual large intestine.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = esophagus
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10/35. Squamous cell carcinoma in esophageal remnant after 24 years: lessons learnt from esophageal bypass surgery.

    Cervical esophageal carcinoma has been a vexing problem because of the multicentric nature of the disease, the common advanced stage at presentation (with invasion of important adjacent structures, especially the trachea or larynx), and difficulty in satisfactorily reconstructing pharyngogastric continuity after extensive resection. In this case report, we highlight the complexity of managing squamous cell carcinoma of the cervical esophagus, which can reappear either as a new primary or recurrence, in a retained esophageal segment 24 years after esophageal bypass surgery. We strongly recommend total esophagectomy at the time of initial surgery and not 24 years later.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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