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1/8. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in a case of anterior hyaloidal fibrovascular proliferation.

    The authors describe the use of ultrasound biomicroscopy for the diagnosis and preoperative evaluation of anterior hyaloidal fibrovascular proliferation (AHFVP). Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed on a 62-year-old man who presented after diabetic vitrectomy with a hyphema, vitreous hemorrhage, and hypotony. Images in the temporal and nasal meridians revealed thickened tissue bands extending from the peripheral retina to the ciliary body, and from the pars plicata to the posterior surface of the iris. A ciliary body epithelium detachment was seen in the nasal meridian. Ultrasound biomicroscopy demonstrated to be a potential tool in the diagnosis and surgical management of AHFVP.
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keywords = hyphema
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2/8. Spontaneous hyphema: an unusual complication of uveitis associated with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Two patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and recurrent uveitis had rubeosis iridis each with an episode of spontaneous hyphema. Rubeosis iridis has been reported to occur in some cases of uveitis, but it has not been seen in those associated with AS. We suggest that AS be included among the conditions that can lead to the development of rubeosis iridis, with consequent silent hyphema.
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ranking = 6
keywords = hyphema
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3/8. argon laser therapy of occult recurrent hyphema from anterior segment wound neovascularization.

    Recurrent hyphema is a complication of anterior segment surgery that may present with a variety of signs and symptoms. The appropriate diagnosis of this syndrome may be overlooked because its presentation is frequently delayed, and its symptoms and signs are varied and frequently evanescent. Major forms of surgical intervention have been recommended for this syndrome, but we believe that many such cases can be treated relatively simply and effectively with argon laser goniophotocoagulation using topical anesthesia. We present five cases of recurrent hyphema from neovascularization of a surgical incision.
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ranking = 6
keywords = hyphema
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4/8. Differential diagnosis of spontaneous hyphema associated with central retinal vein occlusion.

    Spontaneous hyphema refers to a nontraumatic hemorrhage in the anterior chamber. It is uncommon and may result from such conditions as rubeosis iridis, intraocular neoplasms, blood dyscrasias, severe iritis, fibrovascular membranes in the retrolental or zonular area, and vascular anomalies of the iris. A case is presented describing a spontaneous hyphema occurring as a result of iris neovascularization in a patient who suffered from occlusion of the central retinal vein. Spontaneous hyphema and the presenting ocular conditions as they pertain to its occurrence are discussed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = hyphema
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5/8. Intraocular hemorrhage from wound neovascularization years after anterior segment surgery (Swan syndrome).

    At the Mayo Clinic from 1972 to 1986, 15 patients (17 eyes) had intraocular hemorrhage due to neovascularization of the stromal wound years after anterior segment surgery (Swan syndrome). Months to years after surgery patients complained of low-grade blurring that was painless and transient. The hemorrhage was seen after intracapsular cataract extraction, and one third of the patients had had an intraocular lens implant. Of the 15 patients 14 were referred, 6 for vitreous hemorrhage, 5 for recurrent hyphema, 2 for amaurosis fugax and 1 for recurrent uveitis. The average time between surgery and presentation was 4 years. The initial visual acuity was better than 20/40 in 15 eyes (extremes 20/20 and hand movement), and intraocular pressure was elevated above 30 mm Hg in 2 eyes. Treatment included periodic observation (in 10 eyes), goniophotocoagulation (in 7) and limbal cryopexy (in 3). After a mean follow-up period of 3 years all 17 eyes showed normal acuity and intraocular pressure. No patient had intractable glaucoma or phthisis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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6/8. Central retinal vein occlusion and iris neovascularization hemorrhage.

    Although there have been few direct observations, the etiology of spontaneous hyphema in patients with retinal or ocular hypoxia is assumed to be hemorrhage from a neovascular iris vessel. This paper reports observed hemorrhage from such a rubeotic iris in a patient with central retinal vein occlusion, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease and chronic open-angle glaucoma. Bleeding was spontaneous with dilation, but stopped within 24 hours without treatment, leaving only traces of inferior angle blood staining. The two types of central retinal vein occlusion, and suggestions for their management, are also discussed.
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keywords = hyphema
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7/8. Spontaneous anterior chamber hemorrhage from the iris: a unique cinematographic documentation.

    A 54-year-old white female was observed with an apparent spontaneous idiopathic anterior chamber hemorrhage from the pupillary border of the iris. This event was documented by cinematography. A review of the literature concerning anterior chamber hemorrhage is presented and reports of spontaneous hyphema enumerated. The relationship of the entity of pupillary vascular tufts to the present report are discussed and etiologic factors considered. It is apparent that closer scrutiny of the pupillary border should be performed and iris angiography obtained in a variety of eyes to delineate normal and abnormal variants.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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8/8. Late hyphema after small incision cataract surgery.

    A 68-year-old patient presented with a spontaneous hyphema 11 months after successful small incision cataract surgery. There was evidence of neovascularization of the wound. The intraocular lens was sequestered in the capsular bag within an intact capsulorhexis. Wound neovascularization as a complication of cataract surgery has become extremely rare with the increase in the popularity of the corneal incision for extracapsular cataract surgery. But the complication could become more common with the return to scleral incisions for phacoemulsification. Precise wound construction is necessary to avoid this complication.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hyphema
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