Cases reported "Nephritis, Interstitial"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/121. Acute renal failure in a patient with AIDS: histoplasmosis-induced granulomatous interstitial nephritis.

    Although the most frequent cause of acute renal failure (ARF) in patients with AIDS is acute tubular necrosis (ATN) secondary to ischemic renal injury from septicemia, a spectrum of causes may result in ARF in these patients. We report a patient with AIDS who developed ARF and was found to have granulomatous interstitial nephritis as a result of disseminated histoplasmosis. histoplasma capsulatum was seen in the interstitium of the kidney on renal biopsy. The patient was treated with amphotericin b and itraconazole. Although he continues to require hemodialysis 3 months after his initial presentation, his other presenting symptoms have resolved with antifungal therapy. We also discuss the literature on disseminated histoplasmosis and renal failure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/121. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis in extrapulmonary sarcoidosis.

    sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder in which the lungs or intrathoracic lymph nodes are involved in more than 90% of patients with the disease. It occasionally involves kidneys most commonly due to disordered calcium metabolism. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a distinct renal pathology in sarcoidosis. Renal dysfunction due to granulomatous interstitial nephritis is rare. We recently encountered a sarcoidosis patient without hypercalcemia and any evidence of pulmonary involvement which is distinctly unusual.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/121. Chronic interstitial nephritis due to 5-aminosalicylic acid.

    Nephrotoxicity has recently been reported with the use of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) which has structural similarities to phenacetin and aspirin. The present paper describes 2 cases of interstitial nephritis and 1 case of end-stage failure associated with 5-ASA treatment. The first patient presented with severe renal failure which was partially reversed with 5-ASA discontinuation and steroid therapy. The second had severe renal failure (serum creatinine 469 mmol/l) but renal function stabilized with 5-ASA withdrawal. The third patient had end-stage renal failure and underwent hemodialysis and a successful kidney transplant.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/121. Massive T wave changes following a combined kidney and liver transplant in a young female with cirrhosis.

    We report the case of a young female with PSC-associated cirrhosis and chronic renal failure who developed clinical and electrocardiographic signs consistent with acute myocardial infarction after a combined kidney and liver transplant. Cardiac investigations at that time were negative and she is currently asymptomatic one year post-transplant with resolution of most of her ECG abnormalities. Although the cause of her symptoms and ECG abnormalities is not immediately apparent, this case illustrates the difficulties in interpreting abnormal cardiac investigations in transplanted patients with liver cirrhosis who may have a background of subclinical cardiac disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/121. Acute plasmacytic interstitial nephritis in a child with down syndrome.

    A 7.5-year-old boy with down syndrome presented in acute renal failure (ARF) needing dialysis. When 1.5 years old he had a neuroblastoma, was treated for 1 year with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and off chemotherapy had since been in remission. Renal biopsy revealed an interstitial inflammation, principally of plasma cells with some lymphocytes and eosinophils. Immunofluorescence showed no deposition of immunoglobulins or complement (C3). The plasma cells were a mixture of kappa and lambda light chain-producing cells. The patient spontaneously improved a week after admission. Initial ultrasonography showed enlarged kidneys with loss of corticomedullary differentiation. We are unaware of a report of ARF in a child, resulting primarily from a polyclonal plasmacytic interstitial nephritis. The etiology remains unclear.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/121. Granulomatous tubulointerstitial nephritis in the renal allograft.

    Granulomatous tubulointerstitial nephritis has rarely been described in renal allografts. Of 1,574 renal allograft tissue specimens obtained from 514 patients in the period 1993 to 1998, we report three cases (0.6%) with interstitial nephritis containing multiple noncaseating granulomas. biopsy specimen 1 was obtained from a 44-year-old woman with a 6-day history of systemic candida albicans infection and showed multiple granulomas containing budding yeasts. biopsy specimen 2 was from a 33-year-old man who presented with miliary spread of mycobacterium tuberculosis 12 days before the allograft biopsy. biopsy specimen 3 was from a 23-year-old woman who presented with escherichia coli urinary infection and bacteremia that was treated with antibiotics for 10 days before the biopsy. Granulomatous inflammation in reponse to infectious agents or drugs in immunosuppressed kidney transplant recipients can rarely give rise to allograft interstitial nephritis that is distinct from acute rejection. To our knowledge, there are no prior reports of granulomatous tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with C albicans and E coli infection or antibiotic therapy in human renal allografts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/121. Successful steroid therapy for cefdinir-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis with progressive renal failure.

    A 58-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of renal dysfunction that continued to progress even after withdrawal of cefdinir, the presumed cause of acute renal failure. Renal histologic findings included interstitial fibrosis accompanied by moderate lymphocytic infiltration, and tubular atrophy with reduced numbers of epithelial cells. mesangial cells and glomerular basement membranes were nearly normal. Scintigraphy with 67gallium disclosed diffuse abnormal accumulation in both kidneys. A lymphocyte stimulation test with cefdinir was positive. The patient was diagnosed with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis caused by cefdinir. serum creatinine concentrations continued to rise after withdrawal of the drug, but steroid therapy was effective in normalizing renal function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/121. adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and renal allograft dysfunction.

    adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rarely diagnosed cause of renal allograft dysfunction. We report the case of a 42-year-old man who presented in 1996 with idiopathic renal failure. Native kidney biopsy showed extensive microcrystalline interstitial nephritis. The patient subsequently underwent a living-related kidney transplant with excellent early graft function. During the next year, however, he had worsening allograft function, and allograft biopsy showed recurrent interstitial nephritis. Further chemical and spectroscopic analysis showed this lesion to be an annular microcrystalline nephritis consistent with APRT deficiency. This diagnosis was confirmed on erythrocyte assay. Treatment with allopurinol and a low-purine diet led to improvement and stabilization of renal function. APRT is a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction requiring a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis and treatment. Increased physician awareness in the united states may hasten diagnosis and limit the morbidity associated with this disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/121. Persistent flank pain, low-grade fever, and malaise in a woman treated with indinavir.

    This case report describes a 32-year-old woman treated with indinavir who developed mild to moderate flank pain, malaise, and low-grade fever. Sterile pyuria preceded increased serum creatinine levels. Workup revealed persistent pyuria, normal-sized kidneys, a normal intravenous pyelography, and negative urinary cultures. Renal biopsy showed interstitial nephritis and chronic inflammation. Collecting ducts contained crystals. Two months after treatment with indinavir was discontinued, serum creatinine levels returned to normal and pyuria disappeared. Sterile pyuria in patients taking indinavir may help to identify patients at risk for renal dysfunction and interstitial nephritis. Markedly increasing the fluid intake above the recommended dosage may ameliorate or even reverse the process of tubulointerstitial disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/121. Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome with autoantibody directed to renal tubular cells.

    The pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) syndrome remains unknown, but T cell-mediated immune response has been postulated to play a role. On the other hand, TINU syndrome is characterized by hypergammaglobulinemia and high serum immunoglobulin g (IgG) levels, suggesting an involvement of humoral immunity. We describe a case of TINU syndrome in a 13-year-old girl with multiple tubular dysfunctions including renal glucosuria, tubular proteinuria, phosphaturia, uricosuria, and concentrating and acidifying defect. IgG antibody from her serum was reactive against 125-kDa human kidney protein. Immunofluorescence study using mouse kidney revealed that the antibody was against cortical renal tubular cells. The antibody disappeared as the renal symptoms resolved. We suggest that IgG antibody may contribute to tubular dysfunction in some patients with TINU syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Nephritis, Interstitial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.