Cases reported "Nephrocalcinosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/43. rickets in an infant with williams syndrome.

    calcium homeostasis is altered in patients with williams syndrome. We report an infant in whom williams syndrome was diagnosed at 4 weeks who presented with hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, and medullary nephrocalcinosis. fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated a deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7. This infant was treated with a low-calcium/vitamin d-deficient infant formula that resulted in the development of rickets. Replacement of the low-calcium/vitamin d-deficient formula with standard formula led to resolution of the rickets.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/43. growth and metabolic disturbances in a patient with total parenteral nutrition: a case of hypercalciuric hypercalcemia.

    hypercalciuria is a common side effect during total parenteral nutrition (TPN). We report a patient with long-term TPN, who demonstrated hypercalciuria, hypercalcemia and growth retardation. The patient is a six-year-old Japanese girl with hirschsprung disease (jejunal agangliosis). jejunostomy was performed at one-month old and since then her nutrition has depended mostly on TPN. When she was 3 years old, continuous TPN was switched to cyclic TPN (on TPN for 11 hrs and off TPN for 13 hrs). The urinary calcium level has been elevated (Ca/Cre ratio, 1.0) since 3 months of age, whereas serum calcium levels stayed within normal range for a while. The serum calcium levels started to elevate to 12 to approximately 13 mg/dl when she was 3 years and 8 months old. She showed growth retardation (height SD score was -4.2SD when she was 5 years and 8 months old) and deteriorated renal tubular function with renal glycosuria, elevated beta 2-microglobulin (beta2-MG) and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. She was referred to our division for the investigation and treatment of growth disturbance and Ca metabolism. Her bone age was delayed (BA/CA 0.62) and serum IGF-I level was decreased but her GH response to provocation test was normal. Bilateral nephrocalcinosis was revealed by renal echogram and CT scan. By reducing calcium content in TPN solution, the serum and urinary calcium levels could be maintained within normal range and her renal function and growth velocity was improved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/43. Familial hypomagnesemia-hypercalciuria in 2 siblings.

    Familial hypomagnesemia-hypercalciuria with nephrocalcinosis and renal insufficiency in childhood is a rarely described disease. Two siblings of consanguineous Tunesian parents (first cousins), a 2-year-old boy and a 4-year-old girl presented with renal insufficiency and severe bilateral nephrocalcinosis. Both were found to have decreased serum and intracellular magnesium concentrations, increased urinary excretion of magnesium and calcium, mild glomerular and severe tubular proteinuria and low citrate excretion in urine. Pathological biochemical findings and the severity of nephrocalcinosis of the boy compared to findings of the sister were strongly marked, histology of the boy's kidney showed severe medullary nephrocalcinosis, tubular atrophy, focal lymphoplasmacellulary infiltration, focal cortical fibrosis, immature glomerula, segmental and global glomerulosclerosis. Subsequent mutation analysis revealed a homozygous frameshift mutation in the gene paracellin-1 in both affected individuals. Therapy consisted of sodium bicarbonate, cholecalciferol, calcitriol, hydrochlorothiazide, citrate salts and oral magnesium administration. hypercalciuria decreased in both children by therapy with thiazide diuretics, but hypomagnesemia was unresponsive to magnesium administration. After a 32-month follow-up the boy commenced hemodialysis at the age of 5 years, whereas his sister showed no decline in renal function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/43. Hypomagnesemia due to renal disease of unknown etiology.

    A young man, investigated because of tetanic convulsions and arthritic pains, was shown to have hypomagnesemia, hypermagnesuria, hypokalemia, hypercalciuria, progressive nephrocalcinosis and chondrocalcinosis. In this syndrome, renal function was normal except for the abnormal excretion of electrolytes. Renal sodium conservation was normal. light and electron microscopic studies of renal biopsy specimens showed the presence of several abnormal tubules. Immunofluorescent staining showed deposits of immunoglobulins in the glomeruli and tubules. magnesium therapy was started under balance study conditions and resulted in decreased calciuria and complete remission of subjective symptoms. The progression of nephrocalcinosis was halted, and there was some decrease in the intra-articular calcium deposits after two years of continuous oral magnesium therapy. The administration of spironolactone decreased urinary magnesium but did not normalize it, whereas triamterene administration was without effect in this respect. The results of the morphologic and electrolyte balance studies are discussed. The patient was found to exhibit several features which have not been described before in connection with hypomagnesemia of unknown origin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/43. A girl with rickets and nephrocalcinosis.

    A 5-year-old girl presented with short stature. She was found to have rickets due to renal phosphate wasting and nephrocalcinosis. serum parathyroid hormone was suppressed, 25-OH vitamin d was within the normal range, and 1,25-(OH)(2 )vitamin d was elevated. In addition, she had hypercalciuria, proteinuria, which was partially tubular in origin, and a reduced glomerular filtration rate of 58 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Treatment with phosphate supplements resulted in healing of the rickets and normalization of the serum 1,25-(OH)(2 )vitamin d level. This patient is an example of hypercalciuric rickets, most likely due to an inherited disorder of phosphate metabolism. Hypercalciuric rickets can be inherited as an autosomal recessive as well as autosomal dominant trait.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/43. Renal hypomagnesemia, hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis in a middle-aged man.

    We report a 41-year-old man with hypomagnesemia, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, myopia and horizontal nystagmus. The hypomagnesemia was due to primary renal magnesium loss. He was diagnosed as having the syndrome of renal hypomagnesemia, hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. This is a rare condition generally diagnosed by the first to third decades of life. Renal failure is common and end-stage renal disease can occur in children or young adults. The patient was treated with oral magnesium, chlorthalidone, potassium citrate and allopurinol and was followed up for 3 years. Treatment resulted in an improvement in hypercalciuria but serum magnesium level could not be normalized. The patient's renal function remains stable, with a mild degree of renal insufficiency.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/43. Two unusual cases of nephrocalcinosis in infancy.

    nephrocalcinosis is uncommon in childhood, the main causes are renal tubular acidosis, hyperparathyroidism and medullary sponge kidney. It is also seen where there is hypercalcaemia or hypercalciuria of any aetiology; We report nephrocalcinosis in an 18-month-old infant with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Jansen and also in a neonate with McCune Albright syndrome who displayed atypical skeletal appearances and had multiple ovarian cysts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/43. insulin dependent diabetes mellitus accompanied by nephrocalcinosis and renal failure.

    Renal failure was found in a five-year-old patient who had been treated with insulin since he was diagnosed as having insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) at 3 years of age. Laboratory data showed that his renal failure was caused by a renal tubular dysfunction. The autopsy findings of his pancreas were compatible with those of IDDM. The kidneys were atrophied with an innumerable number of crystals in the proximal tubuli. Staining by Kossa indicated that the crystals contained calcium salt. The calcium content of his kidneys was significantly higher than that of control. The nephrocalcinosis seems to be caused by hypercalciuria associated with IDDM.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/43. Two heterozygous mutations of CLDN16 in a Japanese patient with FHHNC.

    Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC, MIN 248250) is a rare autosomal recessive tubular disorder that eventually progresses to renal failure. However, the progression to end-stage renal failure can vary from patient to patient. A primary defect is related to impaired tubular resorption of magnesium and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. Recently, paracellin-1 was identified as a renal tight junction protein predominantly expressed in TAL. Mutations of its gene (CLDN16) have been shown to cause FHHNC. We describe a sporadic Japanese case of FHHNC. The male patient showed hematuria, hypercalciuria, and nephrocalcinosis at 5 years of age. Hypomagnesemia was also noticed at this time. As renal function gradually deteriorated, further evaluation was performed at 14 years of age and a diagnosis of FHHNC was made. Despite several medications (magnesium supplementation, citrate, and hydrochlorothiazide), he eventually progressed to renal insufficiency at 19 years of age. Analysis of the CLDN16 gene demonstrated two heterozygous mutations (R149Q and R216C). Mutations of the same amino acids have already been described in FHHNC and thus these mutations might be the cause of the disease in our patient. Hence, we confirm the genetic impairment of the CLDN16 gene in a Japanese patient with FHHNC.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/43. Familial hypomagnesemia--hypercalciuria and pseudotumor cerebri.

    Approximately 30 patients with familial hypomagnesemia-hypercalciuria have been reported. We describe an 8-year-old girl with cardinal findings of familial hypomagnesemia-hypercalciuria (hypomagnesemia, hypermagnesiuria, hypercalciuria, renal insufficiency, hyperuricemia, elevated serum parathormone, hyposthenuria and nephrocalcinosis), who received combination therapy consisting of magnesium salts, thiazide diuretic and potassium supplementation. At the 4-year follow-up investigation under this treatment, the patient was found to have cerebral pseudotumor (increased intracranial pressure with normal or small ventricles on neuroimaging, no evidence of an intracranial mass and normal cerebrospinal fluid composition) with papilledema and visual field defects. Thiazide therapy was terminated and the cerebral pseudotumor disappeared. The authors hypothesize that cerebral pseudotumor in this patient was related to severe hypocalcemia, as a consequence of profound hypomagnesemia induced by protracted thiazide treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a child with familial hypomagnesemia-hypercalciuria who developed pseudotumor cerebri after thiazide therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = hypercalciuria
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Nephrocalcinosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.