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11/1222. The "plastic bag syndrome". Compression of the digital neurovascular bundles by commercial plastic bags.

    We report a condition we call the "plastic bag syndrome" in which pressure on the neurovascular bundles causes temporary ischaemia in the distal part of the finger together with a neuropraxia of the digital nerves. Although in most cases the discomfort or numbness is fleeting, requires no medical assistance and is readily forgotten, in some instances the symptoms are such that medical advice is sought. Since the injury can lead to permanent damage and subsequent limitation in the use of the finger, we believe that the public should be advised to take simple precautions to prevent it from happening.
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keywords = nerve
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12/1222. Posterior interosseous nerve syndrome due to pseudogout.

    Posterior interosseous nerve palsy associated with pseudogout of the elbow joint in a 71-year-old woman is described. Local steroid injection and administration of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug was effective in treatment.
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ranking = 5
keywords = nerve
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13/1222. Post-traumatic distal nerve entrapment syndrome.

    Eleven patients with paralysis of muscle groups in the upper or lower extremity were clinically diagnosed after previous proximal direct trauma to the corresponding peripheral nerves, without complete nerve disruption. patients were seen within an average of 8 months after trauma (minimum 3 months and maximum 2 years after). Nerve lesions were caused either by gunshot, motor-vehicle accident, and other direct trauma or, in one case, after tumor excision. All patients presented with complete sensory and motor loss distal to the trauma site, but demonstrated a positive Tinel sign and pain on testing over the "classic" (distal) anatomic nerve entrapment sites only. After surgical release through decompression of the nerve compression site distal to the trauma, a recovery of sensory function was achieved after surgery in all cases. Good-to-excellent restoration of motor function (M4/M5) was achieved in 63 percent of all cases. Twenty-five percent had no or only poor improvement in motor function, despite a good sensory recovery. Those patients in whom nerve compression sites were surgically released before 6 months after trauma had an improvement in almost all neural functions, compared to those patients who underwent surgery later than 9 months post trauma. A possible explanation of traumatically caused neurogenic paralysis with subsequent distal nerve compressions is provided, using the "double crush syndrome" hypothesis.
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ranking = 10.107060930769
keywords = nerve, peripheral nerve, peripheral
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14/1222. sural nerve entrapment after injury to the gastrocnemius: a case report.

    A 43-year-old man developed progressive calf pain and paresthesias after a strain of the right gastrocnemius muscle. physical examination revealed sensory loss in the distribution of the sural nerve with a positive Tinel's sign in the posterior calf in the region of his previous injury. Electrodiagnostic studies revealed prolongation of the sural distal latency with reduction of the sensory nerve action potential amplitude. magnetic resonance imaging of the lower right leg demonstrated abnormal signal in the right medial gastrocnemius consistent with a subacute hematoma. Surgical exploration revealed entrapment of the sural nerve in scar tissue beneath the deep fascia of the gastrocnemius. Surgical release of the nerve resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and full return of sensation by the 3-month follow-up point. A brief review of the literature is presented.
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ranking = 8
keywords = nerve
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15/1222. Nerve root herniation secondary to lumbar puncture in the patient with lumbar canal stenosis. A case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A very rare case of nerve root herniation secondary to lumbar puncture is reported. OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristic clinical features of this case and to discuss a mechanism of the nerve root herniation. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There has been no previous report of nerve root herniation secondary to lumbar puncture. methods: A 66-year-old woman who experienced intermittent claudication as a result of sciatic pain on her right side was evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging, the results of which demonstrated central-type canal stenosis at L4-L5. The right sciatic pain was exacerbated after lumbar puncture. myelography and subsequent computed tomography showed marked stenosis of the thecal sac that was eccentric to the left, unlike the previous magnetic resonance imaging finding. RESULTS: At surgery, a herniated nerve root was found through a small rent of the dorsocentral portion of the thecal sac at L4-L5, presenting a loop with epineural bleeding. The herniated nerve root was put back into the intrathecal space, and the dural tear was repaired. CONCLUSION: Lumbar puncture can be a cause of nerve root herniation in cases of lumbar canal stenosis. The puncture should not be carried out at an area of stenosis.
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ranking = 6
keywords = nerve
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16/1222. femoral neuropathy during anticoagulant therapy.

    Ten cases of acute femoral neuropathy complicating anticoagulant therapy were followed over periods of 1 to 5 years. Most patients had either sensory or motor residual symptoms, but the two patients who had early surgical intervention made rapid recoveries. The danger of parenteral injections or minor trauma to the abdomen, buttocks, or thighs in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy is emphasized.
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ranking = 0.7232865930088
keywords = neuropathy
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17/1222. Anterior interosseous nerve compression after supracondylar fracture of the humerus: a metaanalysis.

    OBJECT: The authors conducted a metaanalysis of reports of anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, a rare nerve compression neuropathy that affects only the motor branch of the median nerve. This syndrome is characterized by paralysis of the flexor pollicis longus, the flexor digitorum profundus to the index finger, and the pronator quadratus, with weakness on flexion of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb and the distal interphalangeal joint of the index finger without sensory loss. methods: The authors reviewed reports of 34 cases of anterior interosseous nerve syndrome combined with supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children. They have added a new case identified in a 7-year-old boy in whom a diagnosis was made from the clinical findings and whose treatment and outcome are analyzed. The ages of patients reported in the literature ranged from 4 to 10 years. Ten patients (29%) were treated with closed reduction and application of a cast, whereas 25 patients (71%) were treated with open reduction and fixation of the fracture. CONCLUSIONS: All patients regained full flexion and strength after 4 to 17 weeks. The fractures that were surgically treated showed no entrapment of the anterior interosseous nerve.
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ranking = 9.1446573186018
keywords = nerve, neuropathy
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18/1222. Suprascapular neuropathy related to a glenohumeral joint cyst.

    A man with shoulder pain and complaints of weakness had examination findings consistent with a suprascapular neuropathy with predominant involvement of the infraspinatus muscle. Electrodiagnostic studies confirmed an axon-loss suprascapular neuropathy with greater involvement of the infraspinatus muscle. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large ganglion cyst originating from the glenohumeral joint. The clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiologic evaluation of suprascapular neuropathy is discussed.
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ranking = 1.0126012302123
keywords = neuropathy
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19/1222. Common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 aviator.

    A case of common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 Blackhawk U.S. Army helicopter pilot is reported. A review of the literature revealed several reports of common peroneal nerve palsy, although there were no published reports of this injury secondary to performing flight duties in the UH-60 cockpit. A common practice among Blackhawk pilots is to brace the "collective" with their left knee, subjecting the common peroneal nerve to possible injury. This action should be considered as a possible cause of common peroneal nerve palsy in this select group of aviators.
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ranking = 8
keywords = nerve
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20/1222. Neural compressive symptoms appearing during steroid treatment in a patient with intracranial lipoma.

    Intracranial lipoma is a rare condition, and it is usually asymptomatic. We describe a 67 year old woman who developed blurred vision, diplopia, left sided oculomotor palsy, and ipsilateral ptosis during steroid treatment for giant cell arteritis. These symptoms were considered to be associated with aggressive giant cell arteritis, and the steroid dose was raised. Surprisingly, the symptoms increased, and further examination revealed an intracranial lipoma situated in the Meckel's cave. During tapering of the steroids her symptoms gradually improved. This is the first report demonstrating that steroids may induce hypertrophy of the fat tissue in the intracranial lipoma, causing compression of the cranial nerves passing through the cavernous sinus thereby mimicking the ocular symptoms sometimes associated with aggressive giant cell arteritis.
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