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11/101. Saphenous neuralgia after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus and gracilis tendon graft.

    A case report of saphenous neuralgia following arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendons is presented. The patient complained of paresthesia in the anteromedial region of the lower leg and tenderness at the medial side of the knee without motor or reflex abnormalities. Because saphenous neuralgia can mimic disorders of the knee, peripheral vascular disease, and lumbar nerve root compression, diagnosis can be confirmed by anesthetic blockade. The patient underwent saphenous neurolysis. Six months after surgery, the patient had normal cutaneous sensation at the medial aspect of the lower leg and ankle and she no longer complained of any painful dysesthesia. To minimize the risk of damaging the saphenous nerve when harvesting hamstring tendons, the knee should be flexed and the hip external rotated.
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12/101. Schwannoma of the suprascapular nerve presenting with atypical neuralgia: case report and review of the literature.

    Compressive lesions of the suprascapular nerve produce weakness and atrophy of the supra- and infraspinatus muscles and a poorly defined aching pain along the posterior aspect of the shoulder joint and the adjacent scapula. Entrapment neuropathy of the suprascapular nerve is fairly common whereas tumorous lesions are rare; among the latter ganglion cysts are frequently seen. An isolated solitary schwannoma of the suprascapular nerve presenting with atypical neuralgic pain is exceptional. The location of a schwannoma under the firm deep cervical fascia in the posterior triangle of the neck is implicated in the genesis of neuralgic pains mimicking the suprascapular entrapment syndrome. One such case is reported with discussion of the relevant clinical features.
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keywords = neuralgia
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13/101. Spontaneous compressive orbital emphysema of rhinogenic origin.

    We report the case of a young patient who developed spontaneous compressive orbital emphysema after an attack of coughing. At admission the patient presented left proptosis, diplopia, vision impairment and headache. Computer tomography showed air in the lateral part of left orbit compressing the eyeball and the optic nerve medially. It also revealed a sphenoid bone dysplasia with hyperpneumatization of the left greater wing and with two dehiscences in its wall. It was very intriguing to discover that this sphenoid dysplasia and the flap of mucosa covering one dehiscence were causing a ball-valve effect, allowing air to enter but not leave the orbit. Endoscopic sinus surgery was successfully used to treat this case.
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ranking = 0.00039639460181691
keywords = headache
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14/101. Surgical treatment of glossopharyngeal neuralgia as vascular compression syndrome via transcondylar fossa (supracondylar transjugular tubercle) approach.

    OBJECTIVE: These are the first reported cases in whom the transcondylar fossa approach was applied for the treatment of glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GPN) as a vascular compression syndrome. CASES PRESENTATION: All three cases presented with severe paroxysmal pharyngeal pain which could not be controlled by medical treatment. The patients all underwent microvascular decompression surgery (MVD) via transcondylar fossa approach. The posterior inferior cerebellar artery or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery was clearly verified to be compressing the glossopharyngeal nerve and then was safely and completely moved and fixed to the dura mater by the sling retraction technique to effect decompression. No patient has since experienced any further pain or permanent neurological deficit after surgery. TECHNICAL ADVANTAGE: The transcondylar fossa approach is one of the lateral approaches which is different from the transcondylar approach. In this approach, the posterior part of the jugular tubercle is extradurally removed without injuring the atlanto-occipital joint. The entire course of the cisternal portion of the glossopharyngeal nerve can be sufficiently seen with gentle retraction of the cerebellar hemisphere, when using this approach. CONCLUSION: This approach makes the MVD for GPN both effective and safe.
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keywords = neuralgia
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15/101. Treatment of inguinodynia after laparoscopic herniorrhaphy: a combined laparoscopic and fluoroscopic approach to the removal of helical tackers.

    Laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy has become a popular operation for the treatment of inguinal hernia. However, injury and entrapment of the cutaneous nerves of the lumbar plexus by the staples or tackers used for mesh fixation have been described. Laparoscopic removal of the staples or tackers in the inguinal region has been attempted with variable success. The success of the laparoscopic approach for removal of helical tackers in particular is sometimes limited by the fact that the offending tackers are deeply embedded in the preperitoneal tissues and not readily located with a simple laparoscopic view. The authors report a case in which fluoroscopy was used to help identify tackers that could not be visualized laparoscopically. The neuralgia disappeared after successful removal of the offending tackers with no neurologic deficit. Liberal use of fluoroscopic guidance in the laparoscopic removal of helical tackers in similar cases is recommended.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = neuralgia
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16/101. osteochondroma of the cervical spine causing occipital nerve neuralgia. Case report.

    osteochondroma is a rare tumor of the cervical spine. The authors present a rare case of osteochondroma narrowing the C 1/2 foramen and causing occipital neuralgia. Complete removal of the tumor was performed with release of the pain. The literature is reviewed and etiology, diagnosis, treatment and differential diagnosis are discussed.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = neuralgia
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17/101. trigeminal neuralgia associated with achondroplasia. Case report with literature review.

    A 59-year-old male with a history of 2 years of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of achondroplasia. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with marked asymmetry of petrous bone and compression of pons and trigeminal nerve by the left vertebral artery and anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Microvascular decompression was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared soon after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the first reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with achondroplasia. The deformity of the skull base was considered to influence the development of the trigeminal neuralgia.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = neuralgia
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18/101. A trigeminal neuralgia-like paroxysmal pain condition presumably due to buccal nerve compression in the temporalis muscle.

    We encountered three patients with trigeminal neuralgia-like paroxysmal pain in the buccal nerve region. In all cases, paroxysmal pain was felt spreading to the receptive field of the ipsilateral buccal nerve, and clear tenderness was observed during intraoral palpation at the inner side of the mandibular ramus where the temporalis muscle runs and attaches. It was assumed that the paroxysmal pain might be caused by nerve compression related to temporalis muscle hyperactivity. To lend support to this hypothesis, we also studied the anatomical relationship between the buccal nerve and the masticatory muscles. In this autopsy study, the buccal nerve pierced the temporalis muscle in six (12%) of 52 specimens from 26 cadavers. These findings support the hypothesis that peripheral buccal nerve compression could be an etiology of paroxysmal neuropathic pain in the unilateral orofacial region.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = neuralgia
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19/101. Microvascular decompression of a developmental venous anomaly in the cerebellopontine angle causing trigeminal neuralgia.

    We describe an apparently unique case of a patient with a trigeminal neuralgia caused by compression of the trigeminal nerve during its course by the draining vein of a developmental venous anomaly in the cerebellopontine angle. Typical symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia disappeared completely after microvascular decompression of the nerve. Neuroradiological findings, as well as particularities of this case are described and therapeutic options are discussed.
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keywords = neuralgia
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20/101. Intraosseous dural arteriovenous fistula of the skull base associated with hearing loss. Case report.

    The most common clinical presentations of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are bruit, headache, increased intracranial pressure, and intracranial hemorrhage. In particular locations, such as the cavernous sinus or middle cranial fossa, cranial nerve involvement due to dural arterial steal or venous occlusion may develop. A case in which a DAVF is associated with hearing loss, however, has not previously been reported. The authors report a case in which an intraosseous DAVF and associated hearing loss probably resulted from cochlear nerve or vascular compression caused by the draining vein or nidus of the DAVF.
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ranking = 0.00039639460181691
keywords = headache
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