Cases reported "Neurilemmoma"

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1/156. Gigantic benign schwannoma in the lateral peroneal nerve.

    While schwannomas of the lateral peroneal nerve at the neck of the fibula are rare, this entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of popliteal cysts and in all cases of pain or paresthesia of the leg and foot. magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic tool of choice for diagnosis of schwannoma.
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2/156. E.N.T. manifestations of Von Recklinghausen's disease.

    Von Recklinghausen's disease (VRD) is a neurocutaneous, systemic disease characterized by CNS tumors and disorders, cafe-au-lait spots, generalized cutaneous neurofibromata, skeletal deformities, and somatic and endocrine abnormalities. It is an autosomal dominant, hereditary disorder found in approximately 1:2500 to 3300 births. There are many manifestations of this disease in the head and neck region of interest to the otolaryngologist. case reports of three patients with multiple ENT involvements are detailed. A review of the literature is presented with a brief discussion of diagnosis and treatment. The most common intracranial tumor in the adult is the acoustic neuroma, usually bilateral, while in the child it is the astrocytoma. A defect in the sphenoid bone is common and may produce temporal lobe herniation into the orbit causing pulsatile exophthalmos. Involvement of the facial bones usually causes radiolucent defects secondary to neurofibromata within nerve pathways, and a variety of asymmetrical changes, especially within the mandible. "elephantiasis" of the face is a hypertrophy of the soft tissues overlying a neurofibroma, often quite extensive and disfiguring. Laryngeal and neck involvement may compromise the airway and early and repeated surgical intervention is required. The over-all malignancy rate approaches 30%, indicating that the patient with VRD may be predisposed to developing a malignancy. There appears to be an increased surgical risk in these patients, with some demonstrating abnormal responses to neuromuscular blockade.
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3/156. Plexiform schwannoma of the neck extending deeply to the mediastinum.

    We describe a 42-year-old man who had tumors occupying the right deep neck through the upper part of the mediastinum. The right vocal cord was fixed and bulgings of the pharyngeal and tracheal wall were observed. At surgery, the masses were subtotally removed as much as possible. Histological examination revealed that they were schwannomas. The postoperative course was uneventful, except for the presence of hoarseness.
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4/156. Macrocystic schwannoma in the seventh cervical nerve.

    We have recently treated a case of asymptomatic macrocystic schwannoma discovered between the left neck and the supraclavicular fossa. The tumor, originating from the left seventh cervical nerve, was extirpated. Nearly 70 percent of the tumor area showed macrocyst with transparent fluid collection. The tumor was diagnosed as macrocystic schwannoma histopathologically. Schwannoma is often associated with small cysts but rarely with macrocysts. Because schwannoma is a benign tumor, partial resection against an attempt at total removal resulting in progressive neurologic deficits is recommended. In general, schwannoma does not present any apparent symptoms at an early stage, because it occurs and progresses very slowly. Schwannoma originating at the spinal nerve root has been called a dumbbell-shaped tumor because of its characteristic shape on MRI and cystogram images. We recently have treated a case of dumbbell-shaped tumor that was an asymptomatic macrocystic schwannoma in the seventh cervical nerve.
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5/156. Intraneural angiosarcoma and angiosarcoma arising in benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours: clinicopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of four cases.

    AIMS: Angiosarcomatous differentiation represents the least common form of heterologous differentiation in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST), and is seen most frequently in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. More rarely, it has been reported in patients without stigmata of neurofibromatosis, or in benign nerve sheath tumours and peripheral nerves. This study was undertaken to confirm this rare association. methods AND RESULTS: Four cases of angiosarcoma arising in a peripheral nerve, in a long-standing schwannoma and in two MPNST are described. Immunohistochemical studies were performed on paraffin sections with the alkaline phosphatase-antialkaline phosphatase method. An intraneural high-grade epithelioid angiosarcoma arose in the left posterior tibial nerve of a 78-year-old man, a well to moderately differentiated angiosarcoma was seen in an ancient schwannoma of the lateral neck in a 73-year-old women, and an angiosarcoma of varying grades of differentiation developed in a recurrent MPNST in the thigh of 38-year-old man. In addition a high-grade MPNST in the axillary region of a 30-year-old man showed foci of heterologous high-grade angiosarcomatous differentiation. The neural and endothelial lines of differentiation were confirmed in each case by positive immunohistochemical staining for neural and endothelial markers, respectively. In all cases tested, the neural differentiated cells stained immunohistochemically positive for antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the rare association of angiosarcoma arising in peripheral nerves, as well as in benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours.
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6/156. Malignant triton tumor of the head and neck: A case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Malignant triton tumor (MTT) is a relatively rare, aggressive tumor comprised of both malignant schwannoma cells and malignant rhabdomyoblasts. Because MTT frequently arises in the head and neck, the otolaryngologist must be aware of the nature of the tumor and its response to various treatment modalities. METHOD: This article reviews the treatment and outcome of all reported cases of MTT arising in the head and neck. CONCLUSIONS: Although statistical analysis is limited by the short duration of follow-up of many patients, complete tumor resection appears to carry an improved chance of survival. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may also improve survival, although a benefit of these therapies was not well demonstrated in this small series.
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7/156. Schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic chain: it's not a carotid body tumor.

    Schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic chain is a rare nerve tumor with fewer than 40 confirmed cases in the English literature. These lesions typically present as an asymptomatic neck mass and are easily mistaken for a carotid body tumor during the initial workup. We report a case of schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic chain in a 35-year-old man followed by a review of the current literature.
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8/156. Schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic chain. The virginia experience.

    We present 4 cases of schwannomas arising from the cervical sympathetic chain. These lesions are uncommon and most often present as an asymptomatic solitary neck mass. Preoperative diagnosis can be difficult, even with the aid of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and angiography. While a paraganglioma can often be ruled out, exact determination of the nerve of origin is frequently elusive until the time of surgery. Operative excision remains the treatment of choice, often requiring sacrifice of a portion of the sympathetic chain. Postoperative Horner's syndrome is common, but does not appear to have an adverse effect on the patient.
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9/156. Primary melanocytic schwannoma of cervical sympathetic chain.

    BACKGROUND: Primary melanocytic schwannoma arising from the cervical sympathetic chain is a rare pigmented nerve sheath tumor. Two cases are presented from an academic medical center. patients and methods patients were initially seen with an enlarging neck mass associated with sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. radiography demonstrated a mass located posterior to the carotid sheath. Primary therapy consisted of surgical excision and postoperative radiation therapy. RESULTS: The tumors were found to be melanocytic schwannomas arising from the cervical sympathetic chain. The pathologic characteristics of this neoplasm are reviewed. One patient remained disease free for 12 years after treatment, whereas 1 patient died as a result of local recurrence and distant metastases. CONCLUSIONS: Melanocytic schwannoma of the cervical sympathetic chain is a rare nerve sheath tumor of the head and neck that may be misdiagnosed as malignant melanoma. The clinical behavior of this neoplasm is variable. Preoperative neurologic findings, anatomic location, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry findings help to establish the diagnosis, and electron microscopy may have a role in distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions. Complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice.
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10/156. Incidental sampling of branchial remnants: a potential source of error in fine-needle aspiration of neck lesions-a case report.

    Remnants of the branchial apparatus can produce lesions in the head and neck region in later life, often amenable to fine-needle aspiration (FNA) diagnosis. Yet such remnants or rudimentary lesions can remain clinically undetected and can later interfere with the cytologic interpretation of other deep lesions of the neck, as the present case demonstrates. In this case the lesion, which by a subsequent resection turned out to be a neurilemmoma, had been adequately sampled by the FNA, yet the cytologic diagnosis was sidetracked by the presence in the specimen of immature squamous epithelial tissue fragments and other elements (multinucleated histiocytes, calcifications), on the basis of which the diagnosis of an epithelial lesion, likely malignant, was made. The neck surgery and a preceding endoscopic examination of the mouth, pharynx, and larynx did not identify such a lesion, but a detailed microscopic examination of the fibroadipose tissue between the tumor and the peripharyngeal region revealed the presence of epithelial microfragments with morphology partly corresponding to that of the FNA cytology, highly indicative of a branchiogenic lesion in the peripharyngeal region. The basic embryology of the branchial apparatus resulting in such defects is presented, as well as tentative guidelines for recognizing material deriving from accidental sampling of such lesions during FNA investigations of deep-seated masses of the neck. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2000;22:157-160.
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ranking = 8
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