Cases reported "Neurilemmoma"

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1/863. Malignant cervical schwannoma: An unusual pelvic tumor.

    BACKGROUND: Primary malignant cervical schwannomas (malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors) are extremely rare tumors that grossly may resemble many other more common lesions. The diagnosis, management, and follow-up of a malignant cervical schwannoma are presented with a review of the literature. CASE: A 51-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of perimenopausal vaginal bleeding. A 3 x 3 cm friable, spongy lesion was noted on the posterior aspect of the cervix. Frozen-section analysis could not rule out a malignant smooth muscle tumor. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy aided in the final diagnosis of a malignant cervical schwannoma. The patient is alive and well 1 year from her definitive surgery. Another patient with the same tumor received the same surgical management. This patient is now 10 years from her surgery and is alive with no evidence of disease. CONCLUSION: immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy are useful in the diagnosis of a malignant cervical schwannoma. This case and long-term follow-up from another case provide evidence that simple hysterectomy may be sufficient therapy for this uncommon lesion.
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2/863. Pediatric eighth cranial nerve schwannoma without evidence of neurofibromatosis.

    Schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve are rare in children. We report a 4 10/12 - year-old girl with no evidence of neurofibromatosis who presented with facial droop. Radiographic studies revealed a large cerebellopontine angle tumor. At surgery, the tumor was attached to the eighth cranial nerve and histologically was a schwannoma. This is the youngest reported case of unilateral eighth cranial nerve schwannoma in a patient without the stigmata of neurofibromatosis.
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3/863. Schwannoma in patients with isolated unilateral trochlear nerve palsy.

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical features of patients with isolated unilateral trochlear nerve palsy secondary to imaging-defined schwannoma of the trochlear nerve. methods: A chart review of all patients seen at the Neuro-ophthalmology Unit at Emory University since 1989. Of 221 patients with trochlear nerve palsy, six had a lesion consistent with a trochlear nerve schwannoma. RESULTS: The six patients had isolated unilateral trochlear nerve palsy. Duration of diplopia before diagnosis averaged 6 months. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated circumscribed, enhancing lesions along the cisternal course of the trochlear nerve, all measuring less than 5 mm in greatest dimension. Five of the patients were seen in follow-up, over periods ranging from 11 to 26 months from initial presentation (mean, 15.6 months; standard deviation, 6.0 months). All of these patients remained stable except one, who was slightly worse at 15 months by clinical measurements and magnetic resonance imaging. None of these patients have developed additional symptoms or signs of cranial nerve or central nervous system involvement. CONCLUSIONS: The differential diagnosis of an isolated unilateral fourth cranial nerve palsy should include an intrinsic neoplasm of the trochlear nerve. magnetic resonance imaging is useful, both for diagnosis and follow-up. These patients can remain stable and may not require neurosurgical intervention.
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ranking = 13
keywords = nerve
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4/863. Central neurilemmoma of the jaws. review of literature and case report.

    Neurilemmomas presenting as primary central bone tumors are extremely rare. Only 21 cases have been reported to have arisen in the jaws; all except for one have occurred in the mandible. The majority of these have been associated with the inferior dental nerve. A case of a central neurilemmoma arising in the anterior mandible is reported. Its probable origin is from one of the alveolar branches of the incisive nerve--an unusual site in the mandible. The radiographic features include expansion of cortical bone, resorption of roots of teeth, the presence of lace-like bony septa and a spotty calcification within the tumor. The treatment and the prognosis are briefly discussed.
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keywords = nerve
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5/863. Gigantic benign schwannoma in the lateral peroneal nerve.

    While schwannomas of the lateral peroneal nerve at the neck of the fibula are rare, this entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of popliteal cysts and in all cases of pain or paresthesia of the leg and foot. magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic tool of choice for diagnosis of schwannoma.
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6/863. E.N.T. manifestations of Von Recklinghausen's disease.

    Von Recklinghausen's disease (VRD) is a neurocutaneous, systemic disease characterized by CNS tumors and disorders, cafe-au-lait spots, generalized cutaneous neurofibromata, skeletal deformities, and somatic and endocrine abnormalities. It is an autosomal dominant, hereditary disorder found in approximately 1:2500 to 3300 births. There are many manifestations of this disease in the head and neck region of interest to the otolaryngologist. case reports of three patients with multiple ENT involvements are detailed. A review of the literature is presented with a brief discussion of diagnosis and treatment. The most common intracranial tumor in the adult is the acoustic neuroma, usually bilateral, while in the child it is the astrocytoma. A defect in the sphenoid bone is common and may produce temporal lobe herniation into the orbit causing pulsatile exophthalmos. Involvement of the facial bones usually causes radiolucent defects secondary to neurofibromata within nerve pathways, and a variety of asymmetrical changes, especially within the mandible. "elephantiasis" of the face is a hypertrophy of the soft tissues overlying a neurofibroma, often quite extensive and disfiguring. Laryngeal and neck involvement may compromise the airway and early and repeated surgical intervention is required. The over-all malignancy rate approaches 30%, indicating that the patient with VRD may be predisposed to developing a malignancy. There appears to be an increased surgical risk in these patients, with some demonstrating abnormal responses to neuromuscular blockade.
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7/863. Case report and discussion of hearing preservation after translabyrinthine excision of small acoustic tumors.

    OBJECTIVE: Since 1991, three separate reports have shown how hearing may be salvaged after translabyrinthine excision of small acoustic tumors. The authors submit yet another report of a complete translabyrinthine excision of a 1.4-cm intracanalicular acoustic tumor with modest hearing preservation. An attempt is made to retrace the steps of the operation and recognize and discuss what particular events may have safeguarded the viability of the cochlea. With the availability of cochlear implantation, there should be added incentive to preserve the cochlear neurones if hair cells cannot be saved. STUDY DESIGN: The study design was a retrospective case review. SETTING: The study was conducted at a primary care hospital. INTERVENTION: Therapeutic and rehabilitative measures were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hearing preservation was measured. CASE REPORT: A 55-year-old woman presented with a left-sided hearing loss and a 1.4-cm left acoustic tumor completely filling the internal auditory canal (speech reception threshold [SRT] 30 dB, discrimination [Pb] 28%). A successful translabyrinthine excision of the tumor was performed in November 1995. A 1-year postoperative audiogram showed a mixed hearing loss in the left ear with SRT 85 dB and Pb 0%. Average pure-tone threshold for 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 3 kHz was 50 dB and aided SRT 40 dB with Pb 64%. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed complete excision of the tumor. CONCLUSION: An exceptional case of hearing preservation after translabyrinthine excision of a small acoustic tumor illustrates how it may be possible to preserve cochlear hair cells and neurones simultaneously in certain selected cases. A review of the surgical events shows the value of sealing the cochlear duct with bone wax, selectively removing the vestibular nerves with the tumor by sharp dissection, and safeguarding the meatal segment of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery by a limited dural incision.
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8/863. A skull base extradural hypoglossal neurilemmoma resected via an extended posterolateral approach.

    The case of a 43-year-old man with a right skull base hypoglossal neurilemmoma excised via the extended posterolateral approach is presented. There is only one previous case of hypoglossal neurilemmoma in the literature. The surgical technique described is a new approach to the posterior skull base involving a suboccipital craniectomy, mastoidectomy and the removal of the lateral process of the atlas. It provides an inferior approach to the jugular foramen and hypoglossal canal that allows the lower cranial nerves to be identified as they exit from their skull base foramina. In the discussion we compare this technique to other surgical approaches previously described for access to the region of the jugular foramen.
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9/863. Benign schwannoma of the digestive tract: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of five cases, including a case of esophageal tumor.

    We report five cases of schwannomas of the digestive tract. The patients were two men and three women, whose ages ranged from 56 to 74 years. Three cases arose in the stomach, one in the ascending colon, and one in the esophagus; the latter was a hitherto unreported location for this tumor. The schwannomas ranged from 2 to 11 cm in diameter. They were well circumscribed but not encapsulated, with interlacing bundles of spindle cells, nuclear atypia and no mitosis, interspersed with collagenous strands. Inflammatory cells were scattered throughout the tumors and a peripheral cuff of lymphoid aggregates was observed in all cases. Intracellular periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive crystalloids were found in three cases; no skeinoid fibers were seen. A diffuse and intense positivity for vimentin and S-100 protein was detected in all five cases together with a variable and sometimes focal positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein and neuron-specific enolase. None of the tumors showed expression of CD34 or the smooth muscle antigens tested. The four cases with a sufficient follow-up had a favorable outcome without any recurrence or metastasis. The morphologic and immunohistochemical features of digestive schwannomas were compared with those of other gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Schwannomas have many differences. Digestive schwannomas can be readily recognized on histologic and immunohistochemical examination. They are spindle cell tumors without epithelioid features, with a peripheral cuff of lymphoid tissue. Specific intracellular needle-shaped PAS-positive crystalloids are found in some cases, whereas skeinoid fibers are not. These tumors always express S-100 protein in a diffuse and strong manner, and they express glial fibrillary acidic protein but not express CD34. Digestive schwannomas usually are gastric tumors and have never been reported in the small bowel. They pursue a benign course and are far rarer than gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumors.
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10/863. Primary lymphoma of Meckel's cave mimicking trigeminal schwannoma: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: We report the first case of primary lymphoma of Meckel's cave. The ability of a lymphoma to mimic a trigeminal schwannoma, both clinically and radiographically, resulted in misdiagnosis and flawed surgical strategy. We discuss the characteristics of a Meckel's cave lymphoma on magnetic resonance images, the predisposing medical conditions that should cause the neurosurgeon to add lymphoma to the normal differential diagnosis, and appropriate management strategies. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 40-year-old African-American woman presented with a 5-month history of progressive facial numbness and pain in all three divisions of the left trigeminal nerve. magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the left side of Meckel's cave, with extension into the lateral compartment of the cavernous sinus, without encasement of the internal carotid artery, through the foramen rotundum into the posterior aspect of the maxillary sinus, and through the foramen ovale into the pterygopalatine fossa. The diagnosis, based on clinical history and radiographic imaging, was schwannoma of Meckel's cave. The patient had a history of systemic lupus erythematosus that had been treated with intermittent steroid therapy. INTERVENTION: The surgical approach selected was a frontotemporal craniotomy with orbitozygomatic osteotomy and anterior petrosectomy. The lesion was totally excised, although the gross intraoperative appearance of the lesion was inconsistent with the preoperative diagnosis, and the pathological examination was unable to establish a histological diagnosis on the basis of frozen sections. Histological diagnosis was confirmed on permanent section after surgery as B-cell lymphoma. Evaluation for other primary sites produced negative results. The patient was then treated with cyclophosphamide (Cytotoxan; Bristol-Myers Oncology, Princeton, NJ), doxorubicin (Adriamycin; Pharmacia & Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI), vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy every 3 weeks for six cycles and then by radiation therapy to the affected area. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of lymphoma should be considered for lesions affecting Meckel's cave in high-risk immunocompromised patients. The presence of an apparent dural tail in an otherwise typical schwannoma is the distinguishing characteristic of a lymphoma. The absence of hyperostosis helps differentiate it from a meningioma. At this point, the preferred surgical strategy is biopsy for diagnosis and then radiotherapy and chemotherapy rather than major cranial base surgery for total resection.
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ranking = 6.4384863928409
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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