Cases reported "Neuroacanthocytosis"

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1/14. Sigmoid colon rupture secondary to Crede's method in a patient with spinal cord injury.

    Crede's method is a manual suprapubic pressure exerted with a clenched fist or fingers, used to initiate micturition, in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who have neurovesical dysfunction. It is usually a benign maneuver unassociated with any major complications. This paper will illustrate a case report involving a sigmoid colon rupture secondary to Crede's method in a patient with SCI. Various techniques of Crede's method are briefly described. It is recommended that patients with quadriplegia avoid forceful use of Crede's method, as it may cause contusion of the abdominal wall and injuries to internal viscera, possibly leading to colonic rupture. It is believed that this is the first reported case of such an unusual complication of Crede's method in patients with SCI.
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2/14. capnocytophaga canimorsus sepsis presenting as an acute abdomen in an asplenic patient.

    Acute abdominal symptoms are frequently caused by surgical intra-abdominal problems. However, the differential diagnosis also includes several internal diseases. Overwhelming infections may present with acute abdominal signs, particularly in the immunocompromised host. Asplenic patients are highly susceptible to infections with encapsulated bacteria such as streptococcus pneumoniae, haemophilus influenzae and neisseria meningitidis. Severe infections due to capnocytophaga canimorsus (DF2), are also common in this group. C. canimorsus is a Gram-negative rod, present as a commensal organism in cat and dog saliva. We describe the atypical presentation of a fatal C. canimorsus-sepsis in a 46-year-old man, who underwent traumatic splenectomy two decades earlier.
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3/14. Strangulated internal hernia through the lesser omentum with intestinal necrosis: a case report.

    CONTEXT: Internal hernias account for only 0.2 to 0.9% of the cases of intestinal obstruction. They do not have specific clinical manifestations, and are usually diagnosed during laparotomy for acute intestinal obstruction. Internal hernias through the lesser omentum are extremely rare. CASE REPORT: We report here the case of a 36-year-old patient who underwent exploratory laparotomy for acute intestinal obstruction. An internal hernia through the lesser omentum was found, with a strangulated ileal segment passing through the perforation into an abscess within the lesser sac. The surgical procedures included ileal resection, primary anastomosis, abscess removal, and placement of a drain in the lesser sac. The patient was reoperated 6 days later for abdominal sepsis; a lesser sac abscess was removed and the abdominal incision was left open. The patient stayed in the intensive care Unit for 15 days, and eventually left the hospital on the 28th post-admission day, with complete recovery thereafter. CONCLUSION: The early diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction and immediate indication for laparotomy is the main task of the surgeon when faced with a case of acute abdomen with a hypothesis of internal hernia, so as to minimize severe postoperative complications, as illustrated by the present case.
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4/14. Torsion of a mucocele of the appendix in a pregnant woman.

    A case of torsion of a large appendicular mucocele presenting as acute abdomen in a 38-week pregnant woman is reported. Ultrasound showed a localized cystic lesion with internal echoes on the right side of the abdomen. It was diagnosed preoperatively as twisted ovarian cyst. The patient was treated surgically with cesarean section and curative appendectomy.
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5/14. Case report: CT diagnosis of nonobstructive left paraduodenal hernia.

    The preoperative diagnosis of paraduodenal hernias (PH) can only be made radiologically. PH are seldom diagnosed preoperatively unless they cause bowel obstruction. We report an unusual case of a nonobstructive left PH diagnosed preoperatively by computed tomography (CT). The CT findings of internal hernias are discussed.
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6/14. Inguinal mass due to an external supravesical hernia and acute abdomen due to an internal supravesical hernia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Although supravesical hernias were described as early as 1804, there have been fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature. The supravesical fossa is a triangular area bounded laterally and above by median and medial umbilical ligaments, and below by the peritoneal reflection that passes from the anterior abdominal wall to the dome of the bladder. A hernia starting in this fossa usually protrudes through the abdominal wall as a direct inguinal hernia (external supravesical hernia). Less commonly, it remains within the abdomen, passing into spaces around the bladder (internal supravesical hernia). A 43-year-old mill worker presented with an enlarged painful mass in the left groin. He underwent a surgical repair of a direct inguinal hernia without addressing an unrecognized supravesicular component. Eight hours after his discharge next morning, he presented with acute abdomen, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distention. The second surgery revealed the presence of a left lateral internal supravesical hernia with incarcerated small bowel. This was also repaired, and the patient was discharged in stable condition. This report aims to review and discuss the surgical anatomy of these rare supravesical hernias and calls attention to this type of hernia as an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction.
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7/14. Systemic multiple aneurysms of the extracranial internal carotid artery, intracranial vertebral artery, and visceral arteries: case report.

    A rare case of systemic multiple aneurysms located in the extracranial internal carotid artery, intracranial vertebral artery, and intraperitonial arteries is described. A 56-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with suspected rupture of an aneurysm of the right extracranial internal carotid artery. Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the right extracranial internal carotid artery and an aneurysm of fusiform type of the left intracranial vertebral artery. The extracranial carotid artery aneurysm was successfully resected, with end-to-end anastomosis of the internal carotid artery, preserving the cranial nerves. Five days later, an aneurysm of the left hepatic artery ruptured unexpectedly and was treated with emergency surgery. Other aneurysms in the liver and spleen were identified on postoperative celiac angiography. The patient subsequently underwent an operation for a left intracranial vertebral artery aneurysm by proximal clipping.
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8/14. Paraduodenal hernia evoking intermittent abdominal pain.

    PURPOSE: Description of a very rare case of internal abdominal hernia, namely herniation of the proximal jejunum in the Landzert fossa, through a hole in the mesocolon transversum. MATERIAL AND methods: Based on preoperative history, clinical state and radiological findings, the diagnosis of internal hernia was strongly suspected. RESULTS: Suspected diagnosis was confirmed during laparotomy. After reduction of the jejunum and closure of the hernia orifice, the patient recovered promptly. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of internal herniation should always be considered in every patient who presents with an acute abdomen, signs of (sub)obstruction and non-typical history. The most important diagnostic tool is computer tomography, that is accurate in 77%.
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9/14. ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection masquerading as an acute surgical abdomen.

    Shunting of cerebrospinal fluid to the peritoneal cavity has brightened the outlook for children with hydrocephalus. Nine hundred sixty-nine primary ventriculoperitoneal shunts were inserted for hydrocephalus between 1970 and 1981. During this same period, 2205 shunt revisions were performed in 847 children, some of whose primary shunt had been inserted prior to 1970 or at other institutions. Nineteen patients with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection persented with abdominal pain, fever, and abdominal tenderness; each had acute peritonitis. Three underwent laparotomy with the preoperative diagnosis of appendicitis; however, only infected peritoneal fluid and nonobstructing adhesions were found. A fourth child underwent an unnecessary intestinal resection at another hospital and required prolonged nutritional support and treatment of severe postoperative complications. Fifteen children who presented with an "acute surgical abdomen" were managed with intravenous fluids, gastric decompression, antibiotics, and removal of the intraperitoneal shunt. External ventricular drainage was employed until the cerebrospinal fluid was sterile. The shunt was then internalized in the peritoneal cavity. The abdominal signs and symptoms improved after removing the peritoneal tubing in all children. This plan of therapy has eliminated unnecessary laparotomy in those who may require repeated procedures for control of hydrocephalus.
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10/14. mesenteric cyst.

    mesenteric cyst is one of the rarest abdominal tumours, with approximately 820 cases reported since 1507. The incidence varies from 1 per 100,000 to 250,000 admissions. The lack of characteristic clinical features and radiological signs may present great diagnostic difficulties. The cyst may present in one of three ways: (i) non-specific abdominal features; (ii) an incidental finding; or (iii) an acute abdomen. abdominal pain is the major presenting symptom. Abdominal mass is found in more than 50% of cases and 40% of cases are discovered incidentally. More than one aetiological mechanism is probably involved in the development of mesenteric cysts. Mesenteric cysts have been reported from the duodenum to the rectal mesentery but are most commonly located in the ileal mesentery. Malignant cysts occur in less than 3% of cases. Enucleation of the cyst is the treatment of choice. knowledge of these tumours is important due to the various complications associated with suboptimal surgical management. Two cases of mesenteric cysts are presented including a recurrent mesenteric cyst in a post-partum woman demonstrating the inferior technique of internal marsupialization. The association of mesenteric cyst with pregnancy is discussed.
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