Cases reported "Neuroma, Acoustic"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/30. Isolated metastases of adenocarcinoma in the bilateral internal auditory meatuses mimicking neurofibromatosis type 2--case report.

    A 56-year-old male with a history of lung cancer presented with isolated metastases of adenocarcinoma in the bilateral internal auditory meatuses (IAMs), mimicking the bilateral acoustic schwannomas of neurofibromatosis type 2, and manifesting as rapidly worsening tinnitus and bilateral hearing loss. magnetic resonance imaging showed small tumors in both IAMs with no sign of leptomeningeal metastasis. The preoperative diagnosis was neurofibromatosis type 2. Both tumors were removed and the histological diagnoses were adenocarcinoma. neuroimaging differentiation of a solitary metastatic IAM tumor from a benign tumor is difficult, although rapidly progressive eighth cranial nerve dysfunction suggests a malignant process. Metastases should be considered as a rare diagnostic possibility in a patient with small tumors in both IAMs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/30. Relationship between cystic change and rotatory vertigo in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    Acoustic neuromas are benign neoplasms that most often arise from the vestibular nerve. Many patients with this tumor experience some degree of vestibular symptoms. However, patients rarely complain of rotatory vertigo. Acoustic neuromas are known to exhibit a cystic appearance in some patients. It was hypothesized that cystic change might be a causative factor for rotatory vertigo. A retrospective study of 178 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma who underwent surgery in the Department of otolaryngology at tokyo Medical and Dental University was carried out. The cystic appearance of the tumors was detected preoperatively by magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. The relationship between cystic change of the tumor and presentation with rotatory vertigo was examined. Of the 178 patients studied, only 10 had both cystic change of the tumor and rotatory vertigo, and 120 had neither cystic tumor nor rotatory vertigo. Of the remaining 48 patients, 24 experienced rotatory vertigo with negative findings for cystic tumor and the other 24 had evidence of cystic tumor but no rotatory vertigo. Tumor with cystic change was observed in 34 patients, accounting for 19.1% of all patients studied. Rotatory vertigo was also experienced in 34 patients (19.1%). Of the 34 patients with cystic lesions, 29.4% (10) had rotatory vertigo. The difference in percentage of the two groups did not reach statistical significance. It is suggested that there may be other factors causing rotatory vertigo in patients with acoustic neuromas than cystic change of the tumor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.9131835229791
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/30. glioblastoma multiforme occurring in a patient treated with gamma knife surgery. Case report and review of the literature.

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is being increasingly advocated as the primary modality for treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VS). This modality has been shown to arrest tumor growth, with few associated short-term morbidities, and with possibly better hearing and facial nerve preservation rates than microsurgery. radiation-induced oncogenesis has long been recognized, although stereotactic radiosurgery de novo induction of a secondary tumor has never been clearly described. The authors report on a patient with a VS who did not have neurofibromatosis Type 2 and who underwent gamma knife surgery (GKS). This patient required microsurgical removal of the VS within 8 months because of development of a tumor cyst with associated brainstem compression and progressive hydrocephalus. The operation resulted in clinical stabilization and freedom from tumor recurrence. Seven and a half years after undergoing GKS, the patient presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a new ring-enhancing lesion in the inferior temporal lobe adjacent to the area of radiosurgery, which on craniotomy was confirmed to be a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Despite additional conventional external-beam radiation to the temporal lobe, the GBM has progressed. Whereas this first reported case of a GBM within the scatter field of GKS does not conclusively prove a direct causal link, it does fulfill all of Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced neoplasia, and demands increased vigilance for the potential long-term complications of stereotactic radiosurgery, and reporting of any similar cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2729.1306914545
keywords = radiation-induced
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/30. The value of enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of endocochlear disease.

    BACKGROUND: gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (GdMRI) is routinely used in the evaluation and management of suspected retrocochlear pathology such as vestibular schwannoma. However, its value in the evaluation and diagnosis of cochlear pathology associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) has been less clear. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of case histories and imaging studies of patients with SNHL and cochlear enhancement on GdMRI diagnosed between 1998 and 2000. RESULTS: Five patients with SNHL who required gadolinium administration to establish the diagnosis of endocochlear disease were identified. Diagnosed lesions included an intralabyrinthine schwannoma, intracochlear hemorrhage, radiation-induced ischemic change, autoimmune labyrinthitis, and meningogenic labyrinthitis. In these illustrative cases, the GdMRI demonstrated intrinsic high signal or contrast enhancement within the cochlea and labyrinth in the absence of a retrocochlear mass. In one patient with meningogenic labyrinthitis, cochlear enhancement on MRI led to prompt cochlear implantation before the potential development of cochlear ossification. CONCLUSION: Our experience suggests that GdMRI plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of cochlear pathology associated with sensorineural hearing loss and may directly impact patient management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2729.1306914545
keywords = radiation-induced
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/30. Distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome after acoustic neuroma surgery.

    OBJECTIVE: To define a clinicopathologic syndrome associated with persistent cerebellar dysfunction after acoustic neuroma (AN) excision. STUDY DESIGN: Case series derived from radiographic and clinical chart review. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. patients: In 12 patients with AN, persistent cerebellar dysfunction developed after AN removal. Each case demonstrated abnormality in the ipsilateral cerebellar peduncle on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cerebellar function and ambulatory status over the first postoperative year. RESULTS: On magnetic resonance imaging scans, the extent of cerebellar peduncle infarcts was variable. It ranged from focal brain injury (<1 cm) involving only one third of the peduncle to diffuse defects (>2 cm) spanning the full thickness of the peduncle. Peduncular infarcts were associated with large tumor size (average 3.8 cm, range 2.0-5.5 cm diameter). The long-term functional outcomes (>1 yr) varied. Dysmetria was unchanged or improved in over half of the patients (6 of 11 patients). gait recovered to normal or to preoperative levels in 5 patients. In the 6 patients with persistent impaired mobility, 2 had mild gait disturbance, 3 required regular use of a cane, and 1 has been dependent on a walker. One patient had sustained mild motor weakness. Three of 11 patients remained dependent on others for activities of daily living. CONCLUSIONS: Peduncle injury most likely stems from interruption of distal branches of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). These small vessels are intimately related to the capsule of the tumor and may supply both the neoplasm and the brain parenchyma. It has long been recognized that interruption of the proximal segment of the AICA results in severe injury to the pons, with devastating neurologic sequelae. A limited AICA syndrome caused by loss of its distal ramifications seems a more plausible explanation for peduncular infarction than either venous insufficiency or direct surgical trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.9131835229791
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/30. Differentiation between cerebellopontine angle tumors in cancer patients.

    OBJECTIVE: The possibility of metastasis to the cerebellopontine angle should be considered when a cancer patient has inner ear-related symptoms, although such metastasis is rare. Distinguishing between an independent tumor and a metastasis presents a challenge to the clinician once magnetic resonance imaging reveals a space-occupying lesion in the cerebellopontine angle. This study attempted to differentiate between primary benign and metastatic malignant cerebellopontine angle tumors in cancer patients. SETTING: University hospital. patients: A total of 174 cancer patients with inner ear-related symptoms such as vertigo, hearing loss, or tinnitus were seen at the university hospital from January 1994 to December 2000. All patients underwent a battery of audiologic and neurotologic tests. magnetic resonance imaging was performed either when the clinical presentation suggested vertigo of central origin or when sensorineural hearing loss developed. RESULTS: magnetic resonance imaging confirmed tumors of the cerebellopontine angle in 6 (3%) of the 174 patients, including 3 men and 3 women. Their ages ranged from 46 to 80 years (mean 62 years). The final diagnoses were breast cancer with cerebellopontine angle metastasis (1), breast cancer with cerebellopontine angle epidermoid cyst (1), colon cancer with cerebellopontine angle metastasis (1), colon cancer with acoustic neuroma (1), nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cerebellopontine angle metastasis (1), and nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cerebellopontine angle benign tumor (1). CONCLUSIONS: When a cerebellopontine angle tumor is discovered in a cancer patient, metastatic cancer should be suspected when the tumor presents with deficits of the VIIth and VIIIth cranial nerves of rapid progression or bilateral involvement, or extracranial systemic metastasis. Laboratory examinations such as cytologic study of the cerebrospinal fluid and serologic study can assist in the diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 13
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/30. Facial neuropathy due to axonal degeneration and microvasculitis following gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma: a histological analysis. Case report.

    Complete facial palsy (House-Brackmann Grade VI) developed in a 63-year-old man with a vestibular schwannoma 25 months after he had undergone two gamma knife surgeries performed 33 months apart and involving a cumulative dose of 24 Gy directed to the tumor margin at the 50% isodose line. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated tumor enlargement with central nonenhancement, which initially had been recognized 21 months after the second radiosurgery. microsurgery was performed to achieve total removal of the tumor. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations of the facial nerve specimen removed from the edge of the tumor revealed a loss of axons, proliferation of schwann cells, and microvasculitis. In this case, microvasculitis and axonal degeneration were probably the major causes of the radiation-induced facial neuropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2729.1306914545
keywords = radiation-induced
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/30. radiation-induced schwannomas of the neuraxis. Report of three cases.

    We report 3 cases of possible radiation-induced schwannomas observed in our Department. Their salient clinical and pathogenetic features are analyzed and the role of radiation therapy in the oncogenesis of these lesions is discussed. Several cases of radiation-induced tumors, including some of the nervous system, have been reported, but schwannomas have only occasionally been reported in connection with ionizing radiation. The possible adjuvant role of antineoplastic drugs is also discussed, and the literature on this topic is reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5458.261382909
keywords = radiation-induced
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/30. A case of medullomyoblastoma of cerebellopontine angle mimicking acoustic neuroma.

    medulloblastoma is a common malignant central nervous system neoplasm found mainly in children. One the contrary, medulloblastoma of the cerebellopontine angle, the location of the tumor is very unusual. This is the the first case of the medullomyoblastoma, a rare form of medulloblastoma, occurring in the cerebellopontine angle. A 15-year-old boy experienced a sudden hearing loss in the left ear. Conservative medical treatment failed, and temporal MR imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhancing mass at the left cerebellopontine angle cistern and in the internal auditory canal; therefore, the lesion was regarded as a typical acoustic neuroma. Few days before surgery, an ipsilateral facial palsy developed, and a follow-up MR imaging showed a rapid growth of the previous lesion. The extended translabyrinthine approach permitted surgical removal. And under pathological diagnosis of malignancy, radiation therapy and series of chemotherapy was performed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.9131835229791
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/30. Metastatic lung cancer in the cerebellopontine angles mimicking bilateral acoustic neuroma.

    Bilateral cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumors identified on MRI are considered bilateral acoustic neuromas, the definitive diagnostic criterion of neurofibromatosis 2 (NF-2). We report the case of a 67-year-old man with progressive bilateral hearing loss, vertigo, and imbalance. MRI revealed bilateral enhancing CPA lesions, which were suggestive of acoustic neuromas and a diagnosis of NF-2. However, autopsy showed metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung. Therefore, metastatic carcinoma to the CPA can mimic bilateral acoustic neuromas; imaging studies alone may be insufficient to diagnose NF-2.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Neuroma, Acoustic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.