Cases reported "Neuroma"

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1/41. Treatment of a neuroma-in-continuity of the peroneal nerve with nerve bypass grafts--a case report.

    Treatment of neuroma-in-continuity involves neurolysis or resection with interposition nerve grafting of the involved segment. These techniques may be complicated by loss of remaining conduction through axons that were intact prior to surgical neurolysis or grafting. The authors have shown previously that axonal regeneration occurs in an autologous bypass graft in the rat model. They applied this technique to a neuroma-in-continuity of the peroneal nerve of a 22-year-old woman who sustained an injury to the peroneal nerve after arthroscopic surgery, with excellent results. Nerve bypass may be the procedure of choice for treatment of neuroma-in-continuity.
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ranking = 1
keywords = injury
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2/41. Prevention and treatment of painful neuromas of the superficial radial nerve by the end-to-side nerve repair concept: an experimental study and preliminary clinical experience.

    This article studies the utilization of the end-to-side neurorrhaphy concept in the prevention and treatment of painful neuromas. A total of 20 rats were divided into 2 groups (10 rats per group). In group A, the tibial nerve was divided and left lying in the subcutaneous tissue. In group B, the cut ends of the tibial nerve were sutured to the adjacent peroneal nerve in an end-to-side fashion. Evaluation was performed 90 days after nerve injury. For group A, the proximal end of the tibial nerve formed a "classic" neuroma and the distal end showed a degenerated nerve. In group B, the proximal end of the tibial nerve formed a "non-classic" neuroma and the nerve healed into the peroneal nerve with continuity of the epineurium of the 2 nerves. The distal end of the tibial nerve in group B showed evidence of axonal regeneration. Preliminary clinical experience utilizing the same technique in the prevention and treatment of painful neuromas of the superficial radial nerve is presented and other techniques of nerve-to-nerve implantation are discussed.
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ranking = 137.76477317799
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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3/41. Axillary nerve injuries in children.

    Isolated axillary nerve injury is uncommon, particularly in children. The motor deficit of shoulder abduction may not recover spontaneously and can be a substantial handicap. Detection may be difficult initially, as the injury is masked by trauma such as head injury, and concomitant shoulder injury requiring immobilization. After mobilization, patients learn to partially compensate by using alternate muscles. There are few reports of surgical management of this nerve injury. Most concern predominantly adults, and the results are mixed with on average slightly greater than half having a good recovery (defined as grade 4-5 Medical research Council muscle power). We present our experience with 4 pediatric patients who had axillary nerve injury. Three patients had an interposition nerve graft, and 1 patient underwent neurolysis. All patients recovered to grade 4-5 deltoid muscle power. Children with an axillary nerve injury which fails to recover spontaneously by 4-6 months should strongly be considered for surgical exploration.
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ranking = 554.05909271198
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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4/41. Preemptive analgesia in elective surgery in patients with complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be a complication of injury or surgery or have an obscure etiology. Special precautions are indicated (i.e., preemptive analgesia) when surgery is required with a patient who has been diagnosed with CRPS. The complex case of a 44-year-old female diagnosed with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is discussed, including current treatment options. A brief review of the literature as well as the features of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I/RSD and CRPS II/causalgia) are presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = injury
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5/41. A case of superficial peroneal nerve injury during ankle arthroscopy.

    We report a case of superficial peroneal nerve (SPN) injury caused by ankle arthroscopy. A 20-year-old woman underwent arthroscopy on her right ankle because of chronic ankle pain after a sprain. After arthroscopy, the patient complained of pain on the dorsum of her right foot and felt a radiating pain from the anterolateral portal to the dorsomedial aspect of her foot. Eight months after arthroscopy, we found that a neuroma had developed on the intermediate dorsal cutaneous nerve, and performed neurolysis of the SPN. Her symptoms gradually decreased after surgery, and had disappeared by 45 months. To avoid such an injury of the SPN, the safest placement of the anterolateral portal is necessary and is, according to our previous anatomic study, 2 mm lateral to the peroneus tertius tendon.
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ranking = 553.05909271198
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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6/41. Extradural neuromas at the petrous apex: report of two cases.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Two rare cases of middle cranial fossa neuroma located in the epidural space at the petrous apex are reported. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Two women, aged 58 and 49 years, were admitted to our hospital with diagnoses of cavernous sinus tumor. Analysis of preoperative computed tomography scans showed bone erosion of the petrous apex, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the presence of an extradural mass located along the course of the petrous internal carotid artery in both patients. INTERVENTION: The tumor was completely removed in one patient and partially removed in the other by use of the epidural middle cranial fossa transpetrosal approach. In both patients, histological examination of tumor specimens revealed neuroma. CONCLUSION: Because surgical exploration revealed that these epidural tumors adhered tightly to the internal carotid artery, and because they had no relationship to the trigeminal nerve, facial nerve, or proximal greater superficial petrosal nerve, in our opinion, these tumors originated from the distal portion of the greater superficial petrosal nerve or the deep petrosal nerve. These neuromas were mainly found in a site under the cavernous sinus at the petrous apex, a location not previously reported.
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ranking = 45.469481830428
keywords = trigeminal nerve
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7/41. Reconstruction of a painful post-traumatic medial plantar neuroma with a bioabsorbable nerve conduit: a case report.

    Although nerve injuries to feet may be common, primary repair of a damaged nerve in the foot is rare. Secondary digital nerve reconstruction in the foot has not been previously reported. This report describes a patient with post-traumatic neuroma of medial plantar nerve who was treated by neuroma resection; the nerve defect was reconstructed with bioabsorbable nerve conduit. This case illustrates successful, secondary reconstruction of nerve injury in the foot using a new surgical technique. A bioabsorbable polyglycolic acid nerve conduit eliminated the need for a short nerve graft and was effective in relieving the neuroma pain by providing an appropriate distal site for neural regeneration.
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ranking = 137.76477317799
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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8/41. Neuropathic complications of mandibular implant surgery: review and case presentations.

    Injuries to trigeminal nerves during endosseous implant placement in the posterior mandible appear to occur acutely in approximately 5-15 of cases, with permanent neurosensory disorder resulting in approximately 8%. Nerve lateralization holds even higher risks from epineurial damage or ischaemic stretching. Neuropathy from implant compression and drill punctures can result in neuroma formation of all types, and in some cases precipitate centralized pain syndrome. Two patterns of clinical neuropathy are seen to result; hypoaesthesias with impaired sensory function, often seen with phantom pain, and hyperaesthesias with minimal sensory impairment but presence of much-evoked pain phenomena. The clinician must differentiate, through careful patient questioning and stimulus-response testing, those patients who are undergoing satisfactory spontaneous nerve recovery from those who are developing dysfunctional or dysaesthetic syndromes. Acute nerve injuries are treated with fixture and nerve decompression and combined with supportive anti-inflammatory, narcotic and anti-convulsant therapy. Surgical exploration, neuroma resection and microsurgical repair, with or without nerve grafting, are indicated when unsatisfactory spontaneous sensory return has been demonstrated, and in the presence of function impairment and intractable pain.
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ranking = 45.469481830428
keywords = trigeminal nerve
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9/41. Intracranial trigeminal neuroma involving the infratemporal fossa: case report and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Intracranial trigeminal neuroma extending extracranially is not a common finding. We report the case of a patient with a right cystic trigeminal neuroma arising in the middle temporal fossa and infratemporal areas. The clinical, radiological, and intraoperative features of these unusual lesions are discussed, and the relevant literature is reviewed. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 35-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of right serous otitis media associated with recent right facial paresthesia. A neurological examination revealed hypesthesia in the mandibular division of the right trigeminal nerve. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated a 6 x 6 x 4-cm well-enhancing cystic mass arising from the middle temporal fossa and extending extracranially to the infratemporal fossa through the enlarged foramen ovale. INTERVENTION: The tumor was extradural and originated from the right mandibular nerve. It was subtotally removed via a subtemporal-intradural and extradural approach. A pathological examination revealed a cystic neuroma. The patient has remained well during 12 months of follow-up, and no evidence of recurrence has been noted on magnetic resonance imaging studies. CONCLUSION: Unilateral serous otitis media by obstruction of the eustachian tube is a rare initial manifestation of trigeminal neuroma. We emphasize the benefit of neuroradiological examinations (both computed tomographic scanning and magnetic resonance imaging), which provided the clearest preoperative localization of this large intra- and extracranial tumor. A combined frontotemporal and infratemporal fossa approach is preferred, considering the difficulty of surgical removal. The prognosis for most patients was good. Twenty-five previously reported cases were also reviewed.
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ranking = 45.469481830428
keywords = trigeminal nerve
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10/41. The occurrence and characteristics of non-myelinated neuromas within central nervous tissue.

    Three cases are described in which neuromas composed of non-myelinated axons were present within central nervous tissues in areas of tissue destruction, together with neuromas of peripheral myelinated axons. The non-myelinated neuromas were larger than the myelinated, but contained very much fewer schwann cells and less connective tissue fibers. It is suggested that they took origin from heterotopic non-myelinated peripheral nerves, just as the myelinated neuromas are thought to take origin from heterotopic myelinated peripheral nerves. The non-myelinated neuromas are very much less common than the myelinated neuromas, and the inference may be drawn that their nerves of origin may be very much less common, a malformational rarity. Because of their rarity, and the very limited proliferation of schwann cells which follow their injury, these non-myelinated perivascular nerves are not likely to provide the schwann cells which produce the regenerated peripheral myelin about some denuded but perserved central axons in myltiple sclerosis. These may take origin from multipotential primitive reticular cells within the central nervous tissues, as is consistent with the thesis perviously offered that schwann cells are mesenchymal in character. It may also be inferred that any neurogenic control of cerebral circulation would be limited to an effect on the larger, extracerebral vessels in the subarachnoid space.
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ranking = 1
keywords = injury
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