Cases reported "Nevus of Ota"

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1/13. Neurocutaneous melanosis: a case of primary intracranial melanoma with metastasis.

    Neurocutaneous melanosis is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of large or multiple congenital melanocytic naevi and benign or malignant pigment cell tumours of the leptomeninges. Distant metastasis is unusual in primary leptomeningeal/intracranial melanomas. We present the case history of an adult male who had multiple primary intracranial melanomas associated with neurocutaneous melanosis (naevus of Ota) in the ophthalmic division of the left trigeminal nerve. Excision of the intracranial tumours was carried out in two stages, but the patient died 2 days after the second operation. autopsy showed multiple metastatic deposits in the liver. Symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure, the presence of Ota's naevus, and a dural-based mass or masses should alert the treating physician to suspect a primary leptomeningeal/intracranial melanoma.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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2/13. A case of glaucoma associated with sturge-weber syndrome and nevus of ota.

    The sturge-weber syndrome consists of a unilateral port-wine hemangioma of the skin along the trigeminal distribution and is accompanied by an ipsilateral leptomeningeal angioma. glaucoma is present in approximately half of the cases. The nevus of ota is a melanocytic pigmentary disorder, most commonly involving the area innervated by the trigeminal nerve. Elevated intraocular pressure, with or without glaucomatous damage, is observed in 10% of the cases. We report the first case of glaucoma associated with sturge-weber syndrome and nevus of ota in korea.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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3/13. Intracranial meningeal melanocytoma associated with ipsilateral nevus of ota. Case report.

    In this report, the authors review the case of a man with a neurocutaneous syndrome. He presented with an intracerebral melanocytoma associated with a blue nevus of the scalp; its location and its appearance during childhood supported the diagnosis of a nevus of ota. Meningeal melanocytomas are increasingly being diagnosed, but remain rare. Primary meningeal malignant melanoma is the first differential diagnosis to eliminate. Despite their common embryonic origin. the association of a melanocytoma with a nevus of ota is rare. A nevus of ota exhibits the same melanocytic proliferation and affects the trigeminal nerve territory. An ocular effect is not always observed. In contrast to an ocular lesion, a nevus of ota rarely transforms into a malignant melanoma. It is found only among caucasians. During 4 years of follow-up review after surgery, the patient remained asymptomatic. Other than antiepileptic therapy, he received no complementary treatment and cerebral imaging revealed no evidence of recurrence.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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4/13. Two cases of late onset Ota's naevus.

    Ota's naevus is among the dermal melanocytoses that show a distinct pattern involving skin innervated by the trigeminal nerve. Most cases present at birth or manifest clinically in early childhood. Cases of acquired lesions in adult onset have been reported rarely. We present two cases of late onset Ota's naevus which were confirmed by skin biopsies. Both patients underwent Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment with a dose of 8.0 J/cm2 given four or five times at 6 weekly intervals and showed some improvement.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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5/13. nevus of ota associated with ipsilateral deafness.

    nevus of ota is a benign pigmentary disorder that involves the skin innervated by the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is a dermal melanocytosis frequent in Oriental persons but uncommon in white persons. We report a case of nevus of ota in a white woman emphasizing the wide extension of the pigmentation and its association with ipsilateral sensorineural hypoacusia.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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6/13. Bilateral Ota naevus.

    We present the case of a 22-year-old woman, who had presented since the age of 15 a pale-blue spot spread on the right-hand side of her forehead and in her bulbar conjunctiva (first and second branches of the trigeminus nerve), consistent with Ota naevus. A few years later another with similar characteristics appeared on the other side of her forehead, cheek and sclera. No deafness, neurological defect nor visual loss were detected. We comment on the rarity of this case because the patient is Caucasian and also we explain the main complications derived of this disease and consider the therapeutic options.
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keywords = nerve
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7/13. Bilateral naevus of Ota: a rare manifestation in a Caucasian.

    The naevus of Ota (naevus fusculocoeruleus ophthalmomaxillaris) was first described by the Japanese dermatologist M. T. Ota in 1939. It has a reported incidence of 0.2% to 1% in the Japanese population. It usually occurs in the skin innervated by the first or second branch of the trigeminal nerve. The naevus comprises dermal melanocytes and is congenital or acquired during adolescence. Commonly associated lesions include scleral melanocytosis and other ocular manifestations as well as lesions of the tympanic membrane, oral and intranasal mucosa and leptomeninges. Diseases associated with Ota's naevus in rare cases are open-angle glaucomas and melanoma. The naevus of Ota in Europeans is a rare manifestation. We report the very rare case of a bilateral naevus of Ota associated with enoral melanocytosis in a white European person.
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8/13. Acquired, bilateral nevus of ota-like macules (ABNOM) associated with Ota's nevus: case report.

    Ota's nevus is mongolian spot-like macular blue-black or gray-brown patchy pigmentation that most commonly occurs in areas innervated by the first and second division of the trigeminal nerve. Acquired, bilateral nevus of ota-like macules (ABNOM) is located bilaterally on the face, appears later in life, is blue-brown or slate-gray in color. It is not accompanied by macules on the ocular and mucosal membranes. There is also debate as to whether ABNOM is part of the Ota's nevus spectrum. We report an interesting case of ABNOM associated with Ota's nevus. A 36-yr-old Korean women visited our clinic with dark bluish patch on the right cheek and right conjunctiva since birth. She also had mottled brownish macules on both forehead and both lower eyelids that have developed 3 yr ago. skin biopsy specimens taken from the right cheek and left forehead all showed scattered, bipolar or irregular melanocytes in the dermis. We diagnosed lesion on the right cheek area as Ota's nevus and those on both forehead and both lower eyelids as ABNOM by clinical and histologic findings. This case may support the view that ABNOM is a separate entity from bilateral Ota's nevus.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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9/13. Meningeal melanocytoma associated with ipsilateral nevus of ota presenting as intracerebral hemorrhage: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: The authors report a rare case of meningeal melanocytoma presenting with unconsciousness, which was caused by an intracerebral hematoma and associated with a history of ipsilateral nevus of ota. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 75-year-old woman developed nevus of ota in the first and second divisions of the right trigeminal nerve territory, which had been treated with a skin graft 40 years earlier. She noticed right exophthalmos but left it untreated for 2 years and then became comatose owing to orbital and intracranial tumors, the latter manifesting with hemorrhage. INTERVENTION: She underwent craniotomy, during which the tumor was partially removed with intracerebral hematoma. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as meningeal melanocytoma. Western blot analysis demonstrated a retained protein expression of cell cycle inhibitor p16(INK4A) and a high level of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 in the resected tumor. CONCLUSION: The combination of nevus of ota and meningeal melanocytoma has been reported in only four cases in the literature, including the current case. This is the first case coinciding with intracerebral hemorrhage, suggesting the necessity for careful follow-up with radiological images.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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10/13. Atypical midface tumor complicating nevus of ota.

    In the differential diagnosis of midface masses, the nevus of ota (also called oculodermal melanocytosis) is a rare entity. We present a case of a young white man, who lost his left eye function by progression of a melanocytotic lesion involving the ophthalmic (VI) and maxillary (VII) divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The time course, distribution along the trigeminal nerve, and characteristic MR signal intensities of the lesion, in correlation with the clinical, ophthalmological, and dermatological findings, point to the correct diagnosis.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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