Cases reported "Nose Diseases"

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11/32. Nasofacial zygomycosis.

    zygomycosis is an uncommon polymorphic fungal disease. One clinical subtype, nasofacial zygomycosis, is caused by infectious exposure to the organism conidiobolus coronatus. A case affecting the nose and lips of a 42-year-old Malay man is reported here. The clinicopathologic features and management of this disease are described, and its differential diagnosis is discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = zygomycosis
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12/32. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis caused by Saksenaea vasiformis.

    A fatal rhinocerebral zygomycotic infection caused by Saksenaea vasiformis in a 71-year-old man was diagnosed based on the presence of broad, infrequently septate, branched, hyaline hyphae in tissue obtained from the right and left base of the skull, soft tissue, both maxillary sinuses and the sphenoid sinus; isolation of S. vasiformis from the tissue; and demonstration of mucoraceous antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fluorescent antibody studies carried out with a rhizopus arrhizus conjugate, stained hyphal fragments in tissue with a 2 intensity.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = zygomycosis
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13/32. Ocular and orbital phycomycosis.

    Cerebro-rhino-orbital phycomycosis (CROP) occurs predominantly in individuals with diabetes mellitus in a state of metabolic acidosis. Other forms of metabolic acidosis, especially in infants, may predispose to phycomycotic infections. CROP has also been reported in patients with leukemia or lymphoma. CROP usually begins in the palate or paranasal sinuses and rapidly spreads to the orbital contents. Proptosis, loss of vision, and ophthalmoplegia occur and death from cerebral involvement commonly ensues. The fungus tends to invade arteries and cause thrombosis and tissue infarction. rhizopus is the most commonly isolated genus in CROP, accounting for almost all cases. The diagnosis can be strongly suspected by the characteristic clinical manifestations. Therapy includes treatment of the underlying disease, surgical excision of the necrotic tissue containing fungal elements and the systemic administration of amphotericin-B. The effect of treatment has improved since the disease was first described, but the condition still has a high mortality, especially if it is not diagnosed early.
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ranking = 7.5279246775412
keywords = phycomycosis
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14/32. survival in cerebro-rhino-orbital zygomycosis and cavernous sinus thrombosis with combined therapy.

    An alcoholic man with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus had right conjunctivitis, facial numbness, and periorbital edema progressing to bilateral visual loss, and left ptosis in association with a large necrotic palatal ulcer due to zygomycosis. The infection progressed to bilateral retinal vein engorgement; left-sided ophthalmoplegia, fixed dilated pupil, and absent corneal reflex; and right-sided ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, and facial nerve paralysis. work-up revealed disease of both ethmoid sinuses and the right maxillary sinus, with bilateral thromboses of the cavernous sinuses. An aggressive combined therapeutic attack (three Caldwell-Luc procedures, exploration of orbit walls, control of diabetes, systemic and local amphotericin therapy) led to survival with a three-year follow-up thus far.
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ranking = 1
keywords = zygomycosis
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15/32. Primary intranasal fusarium infection. Potential for confusion with rhinocerebral zygomycosis.

    fusarium species are saprophytic fungi that may colonize human skin and nails and may rarely cause invasive infections in traumatized tissue and in debilitated and immunocompromised patients. We report herein a case of invasive intranasal fusarium oxysporum infection in a diabetic patient. This unusual presentation potentially can be confused with early rhinocerebral zygomycosis clinically and histologically. Distinguishing morphologic features and the possible role of diabetes in promoting this infection are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = zygomycosis
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16/32. Septic abortion complicated by rhinocerebral phycomycosis (mucormycosis). A case report.

    A patient with septic abortion complicated initially by hepatorenal failure and later by rhinocerebral phycomycosis (mucormycosis) is described. It is believed that the outcome was fatal because the patient was diabetic and had been extensively treated with antibiotics.
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ranking = 7.5279246775412
keywords = phycomycosis
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17/32. The surgical correction of residual facial disfigurement produced by rhinophycomycosis entomophthorae: a case report.

    Rhinophycomycosis entomophthorae is a rare tropical granulomatous infection caused by the fungal organism entomophthora coronata. The disease arises as a submucosal granuloma, usually in the region of the inferior turbinate, spreads centrifugally to involve the nasal sinuses, alae nasae, upper lip, forehead and cheeks and may produce extensive facial deformity. The response to medical treatment with potassium iodide or co-trimoxazole is variable. We wish to report a case in which staged surgical correction of the sequelae of the disease produced a significant improvement in the facial appearance.
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ranking = 7.5279246775412
keywords = phycomycosis
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18/32. Rhino-orbital zygomycosis.

    A 63-year-old diabetic man presented with sinusitis with orbital and intracranial signs progressing over one week, due to zygomycosis. Despite control of the diabetes, surgical excision of infected tissue and antifungal therapy he died in the fifth week of illness. Pathological study showed extensive fungal infiltration of periorbital structures and mycotic thrombosis of many blood vessels with associated necrosis and infarction of fat and extraocular muscles.
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ranking = 1
keywords = zygomycosis
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19/32. Pulmonary and rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Successful outcome with amphotericin b and griseofulvin therapy.

    An ominous prognosis is associated with combined pulmonary and rhinocerebral mucormycosis (phycomycosis). We report the case of a diabetic patient with ketoacidosis who had extensive pulmonary and rhinocerebral mucormycosis that responded satisfactorily to amphotericin b and griseofulvin therapy. The affected lung is completely atelectatic and has remained so for 12 months without evidence of necrosis or abscess formation.
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ranking = 1.5055849355082
keywords = phycomycosis
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20/32. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis.

    Rhinocerebral phycomycosis is a serious and commonly fatal fungal infection. The causative organism, ordinarily a saprophyte, becomes pathogenic in persons who are made susceptible by coexisting, debilitating disease. We report a well-documented case of rhinocerebral phycomycosis where early diagnosis led to successful treatment, and we discuss important aspects of the clinical evaluation and management of such cases.
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ranking = 3.0111698710165
keywords = phycomycosis
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