Cases reported "Nose Diseases"

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1/63. Hypertensive pneumocephalus and nasal fistula in ventriculo-peritoneal shunt: case report and review of literature.

    A case of hypertensive endoventricular pneumocephalus associated with rhinoliquorrea raised after about 2 years from the application of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt for hydrocephalus by stenosis of aqueduct is presented. The causes of such complication and diagnostic possibilities to point out the fistula by CT and ventricular cisternography are to talk over. Even the indication of external CSF drainage or to the repairing treatment will be discussed. Finally, literature is reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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2/63. Rare case of naso-oral fistula with extensive osteocartilaginous necrosis secondary to cocaine abuse: review of otorhinolaryngological presentations in cocaine addicts.

    We report what we believe to be only the 10th case of palatal necrosis secondary to cocaine abuse in a 33-year-old female patient. Extensive necrosis also involved the cartilaginous and bony septum and paranasal sinuses. Following exclusion of other mid-line destructive diseases her treatment involved saline douches and cessation of cocaine. She remains under review within the department with no evidence of progressive disease. We present a review of the other nine cases of palatal necrosis reported in the world literature and demonstrate a greater incidence in female users. The various presenting conditions of cocaine abuse encountered within the head and neck region by the otorhinolaryngologist are then discussed.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = fistula
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3/63. Oronasal fistula repair with three layers.

    We present an innovative method for closure of oronasal fistulas involving a three-layer repair, consisting of septal mucosa flap, bone or cartilage graft, and palatal mucosa flap. The septal mucosa flap closes the nasal side of the defect. This is an inferiorly based flap along the nasal floor and consists of septal mucosa from the side opposite the oronasal fistula. A slit is created in the remaining layers of the nasal septum, allowing the flap to be delivered into the defect. When the septal flap is folded down in this fashion, it exposes nasal septal bone and cartilage. The bone and cartilage are harvested and are used to create the middle layer of the three-layer fistula repair. The oral layer of the repair is provided by a palatal mucosa transposition flap. This method allows the bone/cartilage graft to be sandwiched between two vascular layers. We have successfully used the three-layer repair on three patients. All of the oronasal defects were 2 cm in size. All patients are at least 1 year after repair with 100 percent closure; thus, no oronasal leakage. The flaps both septal and palatal resulted in no morbidity once healed. Specifically, the surgically created slit in the nasal septum is well mucosalized and barely discernible. Also, no nasal obstruction occurs from the septal flap on the floor of the nose. We perform the procedure on an outpatient basis. The three-layer repair can be used in adult patients with oronasal fistulas of the middle and posterior hard palate up to 3 cm in size. This technique is not recommended for children.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = fistula
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4/63. Nasal fistula associated with dental infection: a report of a case.

    Most clinicians have come across a patient with difficult symptoms to diagnose. Often confusion occurs between odontogenic and nonodontogenic causes of sinus discomfort. On many occasions, sinus pain is due to purely dental causes, whereas in other situations dental pain is reported when the sinuses are infected. Due to the intimate association between the roots of the maxillary teeth and the floor of the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses, diagnosis may be difficult. The following is a case report of a nasal fistula that developed from an abscessed maxillary central incisor.
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ranking = 1.0600273191752
keywords = fistula, dental
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5/63. The dental management of a patient with a cocaine-induced maxillofacial defect: a case report.

    There are several dental complications associated with cocaine abuse, including adverse reactions to dental anesthetics, post-operative bleeding, and cellulitis, which can lead to necrosis of orbital, nasal, and palatal bones. Following is a report of the initial treatment rendered to a patient who had destroyed most of her hard palate over a ten-year period of cocaine abuse. There are no classic socio-economic or educational profiles for abusers of cocaine. Drug abuse victims may present as patients in any dental office. Though there are certain classic physiological and psychological symptoms of their condition, they may not display symptoms at all.
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ranking = 0.070031872371044
keywords = dental
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6/63. Team approach for closure of oroantral and oronasal fistulae.

    Oroantral and oronasal fistulas present with a broad range of causation, size, duration, and extent of infection involving the nose and paranasal sinuses. Accurate diagnosis of the extent of the disease with appropriate radiographic evaluation will guide the surgeon to select an approach that addresses all of the infected sites. When significant sinus disease is found, an endoscopic approach to restoring drainage in all of the involved sinuses can promote predictably successful closure of oroantral and oronasal fistulas. The multispecialty team approach to this disease, with the concomitant management of the sinusitis and fistula closure, is a significant advance in the successful management of this chronic condition.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = fistula
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7/63. Rhinoliths presenting during routine radiography: two cases.

    Rhinoliths are calcified masses found within the nasal cavity. They are an uncommon finding and usually present to ENT surgeons. This article presents two cases where rhinoliths have been recognized in the dental setting, and discusses their management and treatment.
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ranking = 0.010004553195863
keywords = dental
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8/63. Modified retrograde intubation in a patient with difficult airway.

    We report a modified technique of retrograde endotracheal intubation in a patient with limited motility at the atlanto-occipital joint, temporomandibular joint, and cervical spine, presenting for closure of a large oronasal fistula. Despite more recent advances in intubation techniques and technology, retrograde intubation still deserves a place in the anesthetist's armamentarium for the management of the difficult airway.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = fistula
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9/63. Nasal mucosal headache presenting as orofacial pain: a review of the literature and a case report.

    Headaches are a significant component of many facial pain syndromes. These facial pain/headache syndromes often have various etiologies, including neurologic, vascular, musculoskeletal, or combinations of vascular/musculoskeletal origins. Referred rhinologic headache, however, can be overlooked as a cause of facial pain in the dental literature. We report a case of nasal mucosal headache that presented as facial pain and include a review of the literature.
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ranking = 0.010004553195863
keywords = dental
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10/63. Closure of an oronasal fistula in an irradiated palate by tissue and bone distraction osteogenesis.

    Uses for distraction osteogenesis in the craniofacial skeleton have expanded during the last decade. It has become an important rung in the reconstructive ladder for correction of difficult defects. Distraction of irradiated bone has been successfully performed in an animal model but has not been reported in human subjects. We present a case of distraction osteogenesis in a patient with multiple failed reconstructive attempts to close an irradiated palatal defect. An additional benefit included improvement in support of the upper lip from bone transported and the potential for placing dental implants.
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ranking = 0.81000455319586
keywords = fistula, dental
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