Cases reported "Nose Neoplasms"

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1/61. lentigo maligna melanoma.

    lentigo maligna melanoma is a malignant melanoma with a recognizable clinical pattern. It is a slow-growing, pigmented tumor evolving from a premalignant lesion on the exposed cutaneous surface of an elderly patient. Histologically, it is marked by pleomorphism of melanocytes with evidence of invasion. A case is presented demonstrating the features of this malignant melanoma with an exceptionally good prognosis. The importance of the clinical and histologic correlation of emphasized to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = malignant melanoma, melanoma
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2/61. Collision of squamous-cell carcinoma with melanoma in situ in a child with xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Coexistence (collision) of two different neoplasms in the same lesion has previously been documented by several authors. In this report, we describe a 13-year-old boy with xeroderma pigmentosum presenting with squamous-cell carcinoma and melanoma arising at the same site on the nose. Histopathologically, the melanoma component of the lesion was located mainly eccentrically to the squamous-cell carcinoma component. Immunohistochemical stains confirmed the histopathologic findings. Mutations for p53 assessed using single-strand conformation polymorphism, and sequencing analysis revealed a CC-to-TT transition at codon 159 of the p53 gene in the squamous-cell component but not in the melanoma component. This finding suggests a possible role for UV in the pathogenesis of at least the squamous-cell component of the tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a collision tumor comprising squamous-cell carcinoma and melanoma arising in childhood.
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ranking = 0.84158655160622
keywords = melanoma
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3/61. Mucosal melanoma of the sinonasal tract.

    Mucosal melanoma of the sinonasal tract is an uncommon clinical entity, which frequently presents in advanced stages and follows an unpredictable course. We describe a case of a 97-year-old white female who presented with a 5-month history of painless, intermittent epistaxis and who was found to have melanoma involving the right inferior turbinate. She required operative intervention because of chronic epistaxis that had resulted in anemia and weakness. The case is presented along with a review of the pertinent literature. The dilemmas involved in the clinical decision-making process and treatment of malignancy in the elderly patient are discussed. In general, treatment outcomes in cases of mucosal melanoma are poor despite combination therapy, and quality-of-life issues become as important as attempts at complete extirpation.
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ranking = 0.73638823265544
keywords = melanoma
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4/61. Osteocartilaginous differentiation of mucosal melanoma in the sinonasal cavity.

    We present a very rare case of mucosal melanoma with osteocartilaginous differentiation (MMOD). This is the first report of MMOD originating in the sinonasal cavity. Preoperative diagnosis of this tumor from specimens resected for biopsy alone is very difficult, because it has 2 histopathologic components: a primary melanoma site and the part of the melanoma with osteocartilaginous differentiation. The immunohistochemical technique is useful in histopathologic diagnosis of this tumor. Malignant melanoma usually shows reactivity with MelanA (melanoma tumor antigen) and S-100 proteins. We diagnosed this case as MMOD because both regions in this tumor were stained with MelanA and S-100 proteins. magnetic resonance imaging provides the best clinical ability to detect malignant melanoma in the sinonasal region. In this case, the melanotic melanoma site in the posterior ethmoid sinus appeared hyperintense to gray matter on T1-weighted image magnetic resonance imaging. Thus, it would have been possible to diagnose this case as MMOD before operation, even though we could not obtain a biopsy specimen from the posterior ethmoid sinus lesion.
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ranking = 1.2889873921308
keywords = malignant melanoma, melanoma
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5/61. Monotypic angiomyolipoma of the nasal cavity: a heretofore undescribed occurrence.

    A monotypic angiomyolipoma of the nasal cavity in a 34-year-old woman is described. Tumor cells were spindled or epithelioid and contained glycogen and diastase-resistant PAS-positive granules. There were few mitoses, and necrosis was absent, indicating a benign tumor. The stroma was markedly vascular, and a few adipocytes were seen in one area. cells were positive for melanocyte and muscle markers. Electron microscopy revealed abundant dense granules. Although melanin was absent histochemically, it was present using a chemical assay, and the granules may, therefore, be atypical melanosomes. Fine actin filaments, attachment plaques and lamina were present. Initial assessment of the lesion indicated malignant melanoma, but the immunostaining and histologic features indicated monotypic angiomyolipoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case in the nasal cavity.
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ranking = 0.23700420262306
keywords = malignant melanoma, melanoma
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6/61. The Sheffield nose--an occupational disease?

    We report a case of silver tattooing of the nasal mucosa in a silver polisher. The concern in such cases is mainly due to the suspicion of melanoma. The diagnosis was confirmed by using the Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method, which revealed the presence of two types of silver isotopes, at 107 and 109 m/z.
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ranking = 0.10519831895078
keywords = melanoma
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7/61. Mucosal malignant melanoma of the paranasal sinuses.

    We report a case of primary malignant melanoma arising in the mucosa of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Clinical presentation and course of this rare type of melanoma are described, and the surgical management is discussed.
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ranking = 1.2902193320661
keywords = malignant melanoma, melanoma
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8/61. Primary malignant melanoma of the nasal cavity.

    Malignant melanoma is a highly lethal melanocytic neoplasm, usually affecting the skin. Primary malignant melanoma of the nasal cavity is rarely seen. Clinically, most patients display initial nonspecific symptoms of unilateral nasal obstruction or epistaxis. The prognosis is generally poor, with a mean survival time of 3.5 years. Extensive local invasion and distant metastasis to other organs may occur. The usual treatment of choice is radical excision. radiotherapy and chemotherapy appear to have little effect. We report a fatal case of intranasal cavity malignant melanoma in which the patient initially presented with blood-tinged sputum, productive cough, and intermittent fever. Preoperative hepatic metastasis was found. Palliative surgery was performed to excise the nasal cavity tumor. Then, 6 courses of chemotherapy were further administered. Unfortunately, regional cervical nodal involvement and pancreatic head metastases occurred 1.5 years after the diagnosis. The patient's condition rapidly deteriorated, followed by death. We have chosen to discuss this aggressive condition because of its rarity and also to emphasize the importance of its early detection through vigilant attention to nonspecific nasal symptoms. A review of the literature concerning intranasal malignant melanoma is presented. We further discuss its possible etiology, site of origin, incidence, clinical presentations, principles of management, and outcome.
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ranking = 1.7642277373122
keywords = malignant melanoma, melanoma
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9/61. Metastatic melanoma of mesentery.

    A case of malignant melanoma metastatic to small bowel mesentery in an old female is reported. Her primary malignant melanoma of nasal mucosa was already treated. She presented with intestinal obstruction, underwent surgical excision of the tumour and was tumour-free postoperatively.
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ranking = 0.89480168104922
keywords = malignant melanoma, melanoma
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10/61. Nasal reconstruction--beyond aesthetic subunits: a 15-year review of 1334 cases.

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 1334 patients who underwent nasal reconstruction between 1986 and 2001. The senior author performed all reconstructions in this series after Mohs' histographic excisions. Only secondary reconstructions were performed without a preceding Mohs' excision. methods of reconstruction, number of operations per patient, locations of defects, and complications were recorded. Using preoperative and postoperative photographs, aesthetic results were reviewed. Basal cell carcinoma was the most common lesion, followed by squamous cancer and melanoma. The average age of the patients was 51 years. Cancers most commonly arose on the dorsum, ala, and tip. Of 1334 cases, a 1.9 percent recurrence rate was documented. The average time between surgery and clinical recognition of recurrence was 39 months. All recurrent lesions were reexcised by the Mohs' technique. Eighty-one percent of reconstructions were completed in three or fewer stages. Seventy-five percent of reconstructions were completed in two stages. Primary dermabrasion or primary laserbrasion using carbon dioxide or erbium lasers was used in nearly every case. Early secondary dermabrasion or laserbrasion was used in a few cases where indicated. A 1.2 percent revision rate was noted (16 patients). Thirteen partial flap necroses required revision. Three patients experienced dehiscence at the donor site of paramedian forehead flaps. A preferred philosophy toward nasal reconstruction is described. The goal is to achieve optimal cosmetic and functional results while minimizing stages and resection of healthy tissue. Six core principles are advocated that guide efficient and successful nasal reconstruction: (1) maximal conservation of native tissue is advised; (2) reconstruction of the defect, not the subunit, is advised; (3) complementary ablative procedures, such as primary dermabrasion, enhance the final result and decrease the number of revisionary procedures; (4) primary defatting also decreases the number of revisionary procedures; (5) when possible, the use of axial pattern flaps is preferred; and (6) good contour is the aesthetic endpoint.
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ranking = 0.10519831895078
keywords = melanoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)
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