Cases reported "Obesity, Morbid"

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1/5. Pseudoachalasia as a late complication of gastric wrap performed for morbid obesity: report of a case.

    A 66-year-old woman presented with progressive dysphagia of 10 years' duration. She had undergone a Teflon gastric wrap operation for obesity 20 years earlier. Endoscopic and radiological examinations showed a dilated tortuous esophagus and a contracted stomach. The esophageal manometry findings were consistent with achalasia. She underwent an uneventful total gastrectomy, partial distal esophagectomy, and Roux-en-Y esophagojejunal anastomosis. When last seen, 2 months after her operation, she was not suffering from dysphagia. This case report serves to demonstrate that gastric reservoir wrapping is associated with significant morbidity.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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2/5. Esophageal carcinoma following bariatric procedures.

    BACKGROUND: The long-term success of bariatric operations for weight reduction has been well documented, but their potential effects on the risk of esophageal cancer have not been evaluated. methods: We performed operations on 3 patients for esophageal cancer following bariatric operations: 2 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 1 underwent vertical banded gastroplasty. All of these patients had adenocarcinoma at the gastroesophageal junction; 1 involved the entire intrathoracic esophagus. RESULTS: The intervals between the weight-loss operations and cancer diagnoses were 21, 16, and 14 years. All 3 patients had symptoms of reflux for many years before dysphagia developed and cancer was diagnosed. We performed a limited esophagogastrectomy, a classic Ivor-Lewis procedure, and a total esophagectomy with jejunal free-tissue transfer from stomach to cervical esophagus. Two patients had positive lymph nodes. One patient is alive at 6 years; 2 died at 13 and 15 months after undergoing operation for recurrent cancer. CONCLUSION: The effect of bariatric operations on gastroesophageal reflux is not known, although gastric bypass has been advocated as the "ultimate antireflux procedure." The presence of esophageal cancer in these 3 patients years after the weight loss operation is worrisome. We believe that patients who develop new symptoms should have endoscopic evaluation and that epidemiologic studies on the incidence of esophageal cancer occurring years after bariatric operation should be performed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = esophagus
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3/5. Complete regression of Barrett's esophagus after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Regression of Barrett's esophagus may occur after effective anti-reflux surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) is an effective operation to treat morbid obesity. In addition, it provides complete relief of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Regression of Barrett's has not been reported after RYGBP. We performed a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass on a patient with GERD and Barrett's esophagus. At 1 year after the RYGBP, an upper endoscopy was performed as routine surveillance for the patient's Barrett's esophagus; endoscopic and histologic evaluation demonstrated complete regression of the Barrett's esophagus. The patient lost one-third of her preoperative weight and had resolution of her reflux symptoms. RYGBP limits the amount of acid reflux and completely diverts bile away from the esophagus. This may lead to the regression of Barrett's esophagus.
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ranking = 10
keywords = esophagus
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4/5. Perforation of the esophagus caused by the insertion of an intragastric balloon for the treatment of obesity.

    obesity is an enduring chronic disease, with multifactorial etiology. Many procedures and solutions have been proposed in the last 25 years. If patients do not meet the criteria for bariatric surgery, intragastric balloons may be used to achieve weight reduction. Contraindications to balloon therapy are a large hiatal hernia, severe esophagitis, peptic ulceration and previous gastric surgery. Although intragastric balloons are advocated as safe devices, major complications such as intestinal obstruction, gastric perforation and gastric ulceration have been described. We report a case of esophageal rupture due to insertion of an intragastric balloon for the treatment of morbid obesity, for which no contraindication existed. When abnormal pain or discomfort arises, or esophageal damage is noted after insertion of an intragastric balloon, patients must be closely monitored to diagnose a possible esophageal rupture early and thereby prevent severe complications.
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ranking = 4
keywords = esophagus
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5/5. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: an alternative for recurrent paraesophageal hernias in obese patients.

    BACKGROUND: Recurrent paraesophageal hernias in obese patients are technically challenging and have a high recurrence rate. We sought to develop an alternative to the traditional approaches for this problem. This article describes the use of a sleeve gastrectomy in an obese patient with a large recurrent paraesophageal hernia. CASE REPORT: A morbidly obese 70-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of chest pain, cough, dysphagia, and dyspnea. She had undergone an open paraesophageal hernia repair 8 years earlier. Diagnostic workup revealed a recurrent large paraesophageal hernia. Laparoscopically, we took down all adhesions, excised the hernia sac, reduced the stomach and distal esophagus into the abdomen, and closed the hiatus. We then resected the greater curvature and fundus of the stomach, leaving the lesser curve in a sleeve configuration. Eighteen months after the operation, the patient's chest pain, cough, dyspnea, and dysphagia were resolved. In addition, she has lost 57 pounds (255 to 198). CONCLUSION: A sleeve gastrectomy is a potentially useful alternative to fundoplication or gastropexy, or both of these, in the treatment of obese patients with complex paraesophageal hernias.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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