Cases reported "Obesity"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. binge-eating disorder and obesity. A combined treatment approach.

    patients presenting with both obesity and BED face multiple challenges: normalizing their eating, improving their physical health, and working to enhance their own acceptance of their body image. In an effort to feel better about themselves, they often have become trapped in a cycle of desperately attempting to diet, then losing control, binge eating, and gaining even more weight. Several psychological and pharmacologic treatment approaches have been used in this population. Most suppress binge eating in the short term, and some seem promising in the long term as well. However, sustained weight loss remains a largely unrealized goal. More recently, BED treatment programs have attempted to address these goals sequentially or in combination. In either approach, it is clear that adopting a long-term focus and promoting enhanced self-acceptance, which have so often been missing from these patients' previous attempts at recovery, are important tasks of treatment that are likely to lead to beneficial lifestyle changes and long-term improvements in physical and psychological health.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. gastric dilatation in a girl with former obesity and atypical anorexia nervosa.

    OBJECTIVE: This case report describes a 16 year-old girl of normal weight with acute gastric dilatation due to binge eating habits. METHOD AND RESULTS: Psychiatric assessment revealed a history of obesity and later atypical anorexia nervosa, but no current diagnosis of a typical eating disorder. After one month of daily binges a food excess was followed by an acute massive gastric dilatation which led to a laparotomy. DISCUSSION: Clinicians should be aware that abnormal eating habits may cause severe somatic complications even in patients of normal weight who are not currently diagnosed as having a typical eating disorder. Careful investigation of eating habits might have resulted in therapeutic gastric emptying at an earlier stage, thus avoiding the need for surgery in our patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Refining the definition of binge eating disorder and nonpurging bulimia nervosa.

    The diagnostic concept of binge eating disorder (BED) was introduced in response to the clinical observation of Stunkard (1959) that some people with obesity have recurrent episodes of binge eating. We suggest that the DSM-IV concept of BED has resulted in the recruitment of heterogeneous research samples, amongst which are some people with BED, as described by Stunkard, some with bulimia nervosa, some with other types of eating disorder, and some with no eating disorder. We consider the difficulties distinguishing BED from other forms of overeating, especially in patients with obesity, and from nonpurging bulimia nervosa. We propose revised diagnostic criteria for BED and bulimia nervosa that are designed to minimize these problems.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. triazolam-induced nocturnal bingeing with amnesia.

    A combination of behavioural and cognitive adverse effects is illustrated in this case report of a recurrent triazolam-induced eating disorder. The co-occurrence of bingeing, irritability and anterograde amnesia is suggestive of a drug-induced kleine-levin syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. Bulimia: the binge eating syndrome.

    Bulimia occurs in roughly half of obese and anorexic patients. A recent study found 19% of female and 5% of male college students to be bulimic. Binge eating usually comes to the physician's attention from problems associated with purging measures--diuretics, laxatives, or self-induced postprandial vomiting--used by one out of ten bulimic patients. Continuous vomiting causes parotid enlargement, sore throat, spontaneous regurgitation, and severe electrolyte imbalance. We report a case illustrating the bulimic's distorted body image, review alternative treatment methods, and suggest needed areas of research, particularly those elucidating the relationship between bulimia and affective disorders.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. anorexia nervosa at normal body weight!--The abnormal normal weight control syndrome.

    Disgust with "fatness" and a consequent preoccupation with body weight, coupled with an inability to reduce it to or sustain it at the desired low level, characterizes the abnormal normal weight control syndrome. Individuals remain sexually active in a biological sense and often also socially. Indeed their sexual behaviour may be as impulse ridden as is their eating behaviour, which often comprises phases of massive bingeing coupled with vomiting and/or purgation. The syndrome is unlike frank anorexia nervosa in that the latter involves a regression to a position of phobic avoidance of normal body weight and consequent low body weight control with inhibition of both biological and social sexual activity. In abnormal normal weight control there is a strong and sometimes desperate hedonistic and extrovert element that will often not be denied so long as body weight does not get too low. Individuals nevertheless feel desperately "out of control" and insecure beneath their bravura. The syndrome is much more common in females than in males. There is a clinical overlap with anorexia nervosa and obesity in many cases as the disorder evolves. depression, stealing, drug dependence (including alcohol) and acute self-poisoning and self-mutilation are common complications. Clinic cases probably only represent the tip of the iceberg of the much more widespread morbidity within the general population. Like anorexia nervosa and for the same reasons the disorder is probably more common than it used to be.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. Additional categories of sleep-related eating disorders and the current status of treatment.

    sleep-related eating disorders distinct from daytime eating disorders have recently been shown to be associated with sleepwalking (SW), periodic limb movement (PLM) disorder and triazolam abuse in a series of 19 adults. We now report eight other primary or combined etiologies identified by clinical evaluations and polysomnographic monitoring of 19 additional adults (mean age 40 years; 58% female): i) obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), with eating during apnea-induced confusional arousals (n = 3); ii) OSA-PLM disorder (n = 1); iii) familial SW and sleep-related eating (n = 2); iv) SW-PLM disorder (n = 1); v) SW-irregular sleep/wake pattern disorder (n = 1); vi) familial restless legs syndrome and sleep-related eating (n = 2); vii) anorexia nervosa with nocturnal bulimia (n = 2) and viii) amitriptyline treatment of migraines (n = 1). In our cumulative series of 38 patients (excluding six with simple obesity from daytime overeating), 44% were overweight (i.e. > 20% excess weight) from sleep-related eating. Nightly sleep-related binge eating (without hunger or purging) had occurred in 84% of patients. Onset of sleep-related eating was also closely linked with i) acute stress involving reality-based concerns about the safety of family members or about relationship problems (n = 6), ii) abstinence from alcohol and opiate/cocaine abuse (n = 2) and iii) cessation of cigarette smoking (n = 2). Current treatment data indicate a primary role of dopaminergic agents (carbidopa/L-dopa; bromocriptine), often combined with codeine and clonazepam, in controlling most cases involving SW and/or PLM disorder. fluoxetine was effective in two of three patients. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy controlled sleep-related eating in two OSA patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. fasting and postprandial cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentrations in healthy women and in an obese binge eater.

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that abnormal entry of glucose into the central nervous system (CNS) might exist in some chronic binge eaters of carbohydrates, as either a cause or consequence of binge eating. The purpose of this study was thus to determine fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy women, and to obtain similar data in an obese, irritable woman with chronic binge eating of postpartum onset. METHOD: CSF was sampled continuously at 0.1 ml/min from 1100 hr to 1700 hr from the binge eating patient, who consumed 5,000 to 10,000 calories per day (preferentially binging on refined carbohydrates), and 4 healthy women via an indwelling, flexible spinal canal catheter. CSF aliquots were obtained at 10-min intervals for measurement of glucose concentrations. Simultaneously, blood was withdrawn at 30-min intervals to obtain serum for glucose assay. A glucose-rich mixed liquid meal was consumed by participants at 1300 hr. RESULTS: In striking contrast to the normal women, our bulimic patient showed no postprandial rise whatever in CSF glucose concentrations. fasting CSF glucose concentrations were slightly lower whereas fasting serum glucose levels were normal in the bulimic patient, compared with the normal women. After eating, serum glucose levels increased in all participants, but less so in our patient. DISCUSSION: This is the first description of a lack of postprandial elevation in CSF glucose concentration in a patient with a binge eating disorder. Defective transport of glucose across the blood-brain barrier might account for the observed abnormality. While considering other possibilities, we conjecture that our patient's binge eating was an attempt to compensate for impaired postprandial entry of glucose into her CNS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. Skills training treatment for adaptive affect regulation in a woman with binge-eating disorder.

    This case study describes a skills training treatment for binge eating which focused on teaching adaptive affect regulation. A 36-year-old obese woman with a long history of severe binge eating received individual treatment specifically aimed at enhancing her emotion regulation abilities. By treatment end she no longer met criteria for binge eating disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.5
keywords = binge
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Obesity'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.