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11/32. A case of sudden death by decidual cell embolism.

    A 35-year-old multipara died suddenly of a pulmonary embolism about 12 h after delivery. The morphological features and the entry site of the emboli into the circulation suggested that they were decidual cells. Intact decidual cells accounted for only a minority of the emboli: the great majority were cells that had lost their nuclei and/or had been fragmented. The presence of embolized areas, accompanied by fibroblasts and newly formed capillaries, suggested that the embolization process had started before the beginning of labor. However, no symptoms suggesting embolism had been recorded on the clinical chart.
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ranking = 1
keywords = death
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12/32. Treatment of puerperal uterine inversion by the hydrostatic method; reports of five cases.

    In five patients, puerperal inversion of the uterus was successfully replaced by the hydrostatic technique. This method proved to be effective in acute and subacute uterine inversions. There was no maternal death and in one patient cardiac arrest occurred.
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ranking = 388.08911914939
keywords = maternal death, death
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13/32. Succenturiate placenta diagnosed by ultrasound.

    The succenturiate placenta is a morphological abnormality, the antenatal recognition of which is important as vessels connecting the main placenta with the succenturiate placenta may rupture during labor and fetal death may ensue. In addition, retention of the placental material may lead to postpartum hemorrhage. We treated 5 patients with a succenturiate placenta and the antenatal ultrasonograms and related discussions are presented herein.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = death
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14/32. amniotic fluid embolism--2 case reports and a review of maternal deaths from this cause in australia.

    amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a dramatic, rare and frequently lethal complication of pregnancy. Perusal of the National health and Medical research Council reports on Maternal Deaths in the Commonwealth of australia for the years 1964-1984 (1-7) shows that there have been 1,193 maternal deaths in this 21-year period, of which 54 (4.5%) were due to AFE. This paper presents data regarding these deaths and also describes 2 cases of AFE which occurred at Caesarean section performed for placenta praevia, one of which was lethal.
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ranking = 1940.6955957469
keywords = maternal death, death
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15/32. Localized fibrous mesothelioma in the postpartum period.

    The case presented here is typical of the localized fibrous mesotheliomas reviewed in the literature. It had a disastrous impact on an otherwise unremarkable pregnancy. There is no discussion in the literature of humeral factors related to localized fibrous mesotheliomas, but the fever, chills, and rheumatoid complaints in some patients may suggest such factors. The presence of the tumor in the already hypercoagulable state of pregnancy may have predisposed this patient to pulmonary emboli. Anticoagulation led to hemorrhage from the thin-walled vascular areas of the tumor. This acute bleeding produced the hypovolemic shock on the third postpartum day, with a cascade of events leading to adult respiratory distress syndrome and the patient's ultimate death. This case underscores the importance of broad differential diagnosis as a continuing challenge in the practice of medicine.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = death
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16/32. A fatal maternal outcome after delayed delivery in a midtrimester abdominal pregnancy.

    Abdominal pregnancy has been reported to have a maternal mortality rate of 0% to 18%. Presence of the condition is difficult to diagnose, but such features as failure to induce labor after an apparent intrauterine fetal death should make one suspect it. Ultrasound examination may be misleading.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = death
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17/32. Early neonatal sudden infant death and near death of fullterm infants in maternity wards.

    In a large Swedish 2 1/2-year population of fullterm infants the incidence of early neonatal sudden death (ENSD) was 0.12 per 1000 newborn infants considered healthy at birth but presenting with sudden cardiovascular collapse between 6 and 100 hours after birth. In the total neonatal mortality the rate of ENSD was 11%. Well-known risk infants, e.g. prematurity, perinatal asphyxia, difficult delivery or congenital malformations were not included. In an inborn population of 20 123 fullterm newborns the rate of ENSD was 0.15 per 1000. In the same population near-missed ENSD occurred in 0.35 per 1000 liveborn infants. Possible causative factors were infections in 4 and anaemia in 2 cases. But in 7 of 13 infants thorough epidemiological examinations and postmortem sterile autopsies did not reveal the cause of death or near death. These are probably cases of sudden infant death syndrome hitherto unrecognized in the first days of life.
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ranking = 3
keywords = death
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18/32. vasa previa: a major complication and its management.

    vasa previa is an extremely rare condition. Consequently it is not often considered in the differential diagnosis of antepartum or intrapartum hemorrhage. rupture of a fetal vessel may lead to sudden fetal death from exsanguination; therefore, this condition should be suspected in any antepartum or intrapartum hemorrhage. The blood that is lost should be tested for the presence of fetal hemoglobin. Other diagnostic tests to assess the degree of fetal distress are described. Four patients showing unusual presentations of vasa previa are reported. These cases demonstrate that fetal vessel rupture may occur independently of membrane rupture.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = death
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19/32. vasa previa.

    An active obstetric service can expect to have one perinatal death each year due to vasa previa. Unfortunately, little has been done to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this condition, which presents no risk to the mother but is often fatal to the fetus. The various clinical pictures which can be associated with vasa previa are presented, along with a discussion of the techniques readily available for making the diagnosis: palpation and visualization, amnioscopy, fetal heart monitoring, and various tests for the presence of fetal hemoglobin.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = death
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20/32. Neonatal spinal cord injury.

    In this review of the prognosis of patients having neonatal spinal cord injury, findings in 3 patients and 11 case histories from the literature are evaluated as to obstetric complications, clinical and pathologic examinations, and follow-up data from 2 to 12 years, or until death of the child. Eight of the 14 patients died: 4 at less than 3 months of age, 3 between 3 months and 1 year of age, and 1 at 3 1/2 years of age. Six children survived for more than 2 years for follow-up examination. survival is dependent on the level of the lesion, with cervical lesions being almost incompatible with life. The quality of survival for those with levels of C8-T1 and below depends on the child's multiple medical complications.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = death
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