Cases reported "Occupational Diseases"

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1/9. Occupational asthma caused by soybean hull: a workplace equivalent to epidemic asthma.

    A case showing that soya hull exposure at work causes occupational asthma without flour-related bronchoconstriction.
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keywords = bean
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2/9. A case of occupational allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis unique to japan.

    A 15-year-old female was diagnosed in 1980 as having allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) due to aspergillus fumigatus based on Rosenberg and Patterson's criteria for the disease. The patient is the eldest daughter of a family of domestic brewers of soy sauce and bean paste in a small village, an occupation unique to japan. The brewing process involved the use of aspergillus oryzae as a fermenting agent. The patient had experienced episodic wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates during the same seasons in the previous three years, corresponding to the time of the highest A oryzae spore concentrations in the living area, suggesting high exposure to the Aspergillus spores in the aetiology of her exacerbations. She had a prominent family history of atopy and was demonstrated to be sensitive to a variety of aeroallergens in addition to A fumigatus. She was treated effectively by bronchial toiletting via broncho-fibrescope and theophylline medication until April 1981, when she moved to another city. During her life there, chest x-rays repeatedly showed abnormal shadows, and she was treated with inhalations of amphotericin b and bronchial toiletting several times at a hospital. She returned to her home town after seven years in April 1988 and visited the hospital to check her condition. Although she had been away from heavy exposure to A oryzae spores for seven years, precipitins to the culture medium of A oryzae were demonstrated to be far more prominent than those to A fumigatus antigen. Although her family had been exposed to A oryzae spores continuously, the patient was the only family member with ABPA due to A fumigatus and possibly due to A oryzae.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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3/9. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis due to aspergillus oryzae.

    A 19-year-old female student with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) due to aspergillus oryzae is reported. This organism was used for fermentation starter to make soybean paste in her father's workshop adjacent to the home where she lived. ABPA might be considered an occupational disease in certain situations.
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keywords = bean
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4/9. asthma in merchant seamen and laboratory workers caused by allergy to castor beans: analysis of allergens.

    Three merchant seamen and two laboratory workers who developed allergic symptoms following exposure to castor beans have been investigated. Bronchial-provocation testing with castor beans in the merchant seamen demonstrated a late reaction in two. Specific IgE against whole castor-bean extract and ricin, ricinus agglutinin and dericinated extracts of castor bean were found in the patients' sera using radioallergosorbent tests (RAST). RAST inhibition, toxocological and haemagglutination tests suggest that the ricin and dericinated extracts contain distinct allergens.
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keywords = bean
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5/9. IgE-mediated occupational allergy to a spider mite.

    Two patients who suffered from allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis and contact urticaria caused by the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae, Koch) are described. Both patients worked in a greenhouse where they came in contact with both spider mites and predator mites living on bean leaves. Prick, Prausnitz-Kustner and RAST tests indicated type I allergy to spider mite but not to predator mite. Both patients had a high level (RAST score 4) of spider-mite-specific IgE in their sera. radioallergosorbent test (RAST) inhibition studies revealed no cross-reactivity between spider mite and house dust mite allergens. These results show that spider mites, which are herbivorous mites found in nature, in greenhouses and even in homes, can cause IgE-mediated allergy in man.
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6/9. meat wrapper's asthma: identification of the causal agent.

    meat wrapper's asthma is a typical example of occupational asthma due to emissions from chemical products. The authors report three new cases due to the use of the now classic meat packaging techniques in supermarkets. The chemical agents involved were identified. inhalation tests have been carried out in one patient with the complete wrappings, i.e. the PVC film and the price labels, and separate tests were performed with eight additives of the PVC film, and with phthalic anhydride and di-cyclohexylphthalate emitted from heated price labels. These tests incriminate two products: phthalic anhydride seems to be the principal causal agent and epoxidized soybean oil can be suspected as a secondary agent causing this occupational asthma.
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keywords = bean
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7/9. Seasonal occupational asthma in an agricultural products merchant--a case report.

    A 52-year-old agricultural products merchant reported mild occupational asthma and rhinitis throughout the year, with severe asthma from February to May. He had been exposed to various substances, particularly grain, insecticides, fungicides, and fertilizers over 35 years. We identified a castor-bean-containing fertilizer as the cause of the disease by skin prick test and bronchial provocation test. Specific IgE against castor bean was detected by enzyme allergosorbent test, and proteins with mol. mass of less than 14.4 kDa and masses of 15.5, 29.5, and 30.5 kDa were identified as allergens by Western blot analysis. The seasonal character of symptoms could be explained by a more frequent use of the fertilizer during spring. Six months after avoidance of the allergen, the patient reported chronic bronchitis without asthma. Occupational allergy to castor bean should be considered in subjects with seasonal asthma and exposure to "natural" fertilizers.
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keywords = bean
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8/9. Green bean hypersensitivity: an occupational allergy in a homemaker.

    As a member of the legume family, the green bean is frequently associated with food allergy. However, allergic reactions caused by skin contact or by inhalation of vapors from boiling legumes are rare. This article presents a case of occupational asthma in a homemaker; symptoms occurred during preparation and cooking of raw green beans. Skin prick, rub, and bronchial provocation tests were performed on the patient. in vitro tests were done with the serum samples of the patient and 10 control subjects (5 atopic and 5 nonatopic). Test results indicate that the patient has type I hypersensitivity to raw green bean antigen(s). This case is of interest because it demonstrates that a food allergen, when inhaled, can induce respiratory symptoms in sensitized patients and may even be the source of primary sensitization.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = bean
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9/9. Baker's asthma related to soybean lecithin exposure.

    We report two cases of soybean-lecithin-induced asthma in bakers. The patients experienced clinical symptoms in relation to an occupational exposure to this additive. skin tests were positive with soybean lecithin, RAST showed a sensitization to soybean, and bronchial challenge tests were positive for a dilution of 10(-3) with this allergen. The same tests remained negative among healthy and asthmatic controls. Soybean lecithin, a common additive in bakery, must be added to the list of numerous aeroallergens involved in baker's asthma.
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keywords = bean
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