Cases reported "Occupational Diseases"

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1/32. Fingertip dermatitis in an ophthalmologist caused by proparacaine.

    PURPOSE: To report the late diagnosis of allergic response to proparacaine hydrochloride in an ophthalmologist. METHOD: Case report. In a 49-year-old practicing ophthalmologist, the history, clinical findings of fingertip dermatitis, skin pathology, and skin patch testing are described. RESULTS: Proparacaine, as the initiating agent, took almost 3 years to identify because of the unusual pattern of allergy. We explored numerous treatment options before identifying and removing the offending agent. CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmologists may be exposed to proparacaine on a daily basis. This unique report heightens the awareness of this rare work-related complication.
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ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
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2/32. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a welder exposed to metal fumes.

    A 43-year-old man began having malaise, chills, and fever 12 hours after cutting a galvanized steel grating with an acetylene torch at work. Over the next 72 hours, his symptoms persisted and became worse with progressive shortness of breath. He was admitted to the hospital and begun on antibiotics and steroids. The next day his condition had deteriorated to the point that he had to be intubated. Chest x-ray film and computed tomography showed patchy and interstitial infiltration bilaterally, consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Open lung biopsy showed focal mild interstitial pneumonia. Multiple laboratory studies were negative for an infectious or an immune process. The patient remained on mechanical ventilation for 10 days and was discharged from the hospital 2 days after extubation. He continued to improve, with minimal symptoms and a return to normal activity levels several months after the incident with no continued treatment. Re-creation of his exposure was done under controlled circumstances, with air sampling revealing elevated air levels for cadmium and zinc and borderline levels of arsenic, manganese, lead, and iron.
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ranking = 0.0068107726063131
keywords = patch
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3/32. Occupational protein contact dermatitis to cornstarch in a paper adhesive.

    BACKGROUND: Protein contact dermatitis is better known in food-service and health-care workers than in industrial workers. Cornstarch has seldom been a problem, although it can cause contact urticaria to glove powder. OBJECTIVE: To present the case of a paper-bag maker who developed severe occupational (protein) contact dermatitis within two-three hours after returning to work. She lacked any evidence of urticaria and demonstrated largely negative patch-test results. methods: Following a history of occupational exposure to a cornstarch-based adhesive, the patient was patch-tested to materials with which she had worked, which she contacted, and with which she had attempted treatment. Following patch testing, she was prick-tested to cornstarch, the principal ingredient in the adhesive. RESULTS: Patch testing was negative except for a very mild reaction to the adhesive. Prick testing to cornstarch was more severe than the histamine control. The test site became eczematous and remained so for more than ten weeks. Avoidance of cornstarch and the adhesive was followed by clearing. CONCLUSION: Workup for prominent occupational contact dermatitis without urticaria may sometimes require testing for type 1 allergy.
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ranking = 0.020432317818939
keywords = patch
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4/32. Sensitization to triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC) with cutaneous and respiratory manifestations.

    The case is presented of a man with allergic contact dermatitis and occupational asthma due to triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC), which is used as a hardener in thermosetting powder paint. The contact dermatitis was confirmed by patch testing (TGIC 0.5% and 5% in petrolatum), and the occupational asthma was confirmed by bronchial provocation testing: two challenges to an aerosol of lactose containing TGIC (0.05% and 0.1%, w/w, each for 0.5 1 2 4 min) led to a maximal decrease in FEV1 of 22% and 31% after 6 and 4 h, respectively. skin prick tests with unconjugated TGIC were possibly positive. This case confirms that exposure to TGIC in powder paints may cause not only contact dermatitis, but also occupational asthma.
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5/32. Encephalomyeloradiculoneuropathy following exposure to an industrial solvent.

    A 19-year-old male developed complaints including weakness of the lower extremities and right hand, numbness, dysphagia and urinary difficulties following a 2 month exposure to an industrial solvent constituted mainly of 1-bromopropane, but also containing butylene oxide, 1,3 dioxolane, nitromethane, and other components. Nerve conduction studies revealed evidence of a primary, symmetric demyelinating polyneuropathy. Evidence of CNS involvement came from gadolinium enhanced MRI scans of the brain, showing patchy areas of increased T2 signal in the periventricular white matter, similar scans of the spinal cord revealing root enhancement at several lumbar levels, and SSEP studies. The patient's symptoms had started to resolve following the discontinuation of the exposure, before he was lost to follow-up. Similar findings have been reported following 1-bromopropane exposure in rats. I hypothesize that this patient's symptoms may have been due to 1-bromopropane-induced neurotoxicity.
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ranking = 0.0068107726063131
keywords = patch
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6/32. Venison contact dermatitis.

    A 37-year-old meat inspector presented with a 5-month history of forearm eczema. His symptoms improved at weekends and over holidays but flared within a day of work. Scratch patch tests were strongly positive to fresh venison diaphragm and venison liver and weakly positive to venison hide and blood, and lamb blood. They were negative to other venison and lamb components. Type IV allergy tests with Standard European and fragrance batteries were negative. The eczema cleared with a change in work role, clobetasol-17-propionate cream, flucloxacillin and aqueous cream. He was then able to return to meat inspecting. Provided he was diligent about applying 'Dermashield' barrier foam and minimizing contact with irritants, his eczema has remained well controlled over the last 4 years. attention to irritant contact dermatitis is important in the management of protein contact urticaria.
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ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
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7/32. Dentist's occupational asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and allergic contact dermatitis from methacrylates.

    BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by (meth)acrylates (MA) is common in dental personnel. MAs have also caused asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis, but asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and ACD caused by MAs in the same patient appears to be very rare. methods: Occupational asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis were diagnosed in a dentist according to patient history, PEF monitoring, and a work-simulated bronchial provocation test. ACD was diagnosed by skin-patch testing with MAs with the occlusive Finn Chamber-technique. RESULTS: The patient's skin-prick test reactions to common environmental allergens and MAs were negative. The total IgE was not elevated. Occupational asthma was diagnosed by a specific inhalation challenge test in which the patient handled liquid dental MAs for 30 min causing a delayed 23% reduction in FEV1. The provocation test also resulted in rhinoconjunctivitis. On patch testing, positive reactions were provoked by several MAs including 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) to which the patient was occupationally exposed. The patient has not been able to continue her work with dental MAs. CONCLUSIONS: A case of occupational asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and ACD caused by dental acrylate compounds is presented. patients with respiratory hypersensitivity from MAs have to stop working with MAs, whereas patients with ACD from MAs need to avoid direct contact with MAs, but can often continue in their present job if they use no-touch techniques.
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ranking = 2
keywords = patch test, patch
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8/32. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a new york city firefighter exposed to World Trade Center dust.

    We report a sentinel case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a firefighter exposed to high concentrations of World Trade Center dust during the rescue effort from September 11 to 24. The firefighter presented with a Pa(O2) of 53 mm Hg and responded to oxygen and corticosteroids. Computed tomography scan showed patchy ground glass density, thickened bronchial walls, and bilateral pleural effusions. bronchoalveolar lavage recovered 70% eosinophils, with only 1% eosinophils in peripheral blood. eosinophils were not degranulated and increased levels of interleukin-5 were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum. Mineralogic analysis counted 305 commercial asbestos fibers/10(6) macrophages including those with high aspect ratios, and significant quantities of fly ash and degraded fibrous glass. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare consequence of acute high dust exposure. World Trade Center dust consists of large particle-size silicates, but fly ash and asbestos fibers may be found in bronchoalveolar lavage cells.
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ranking = 0.0068107726063131
keywords = patch
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9/32. Occupational asthma in a hairdresser caused by persulphate salts.

    Persulphate salts, which are common constituents of hair bleaches, have occasionally been reported to cause occupational asthma in hairdressers. We describe the clinical and immunological studies carried out in a hairdresser who developed cutaneous and respiratory symptoms, about 1 year after being employed in a hairdressing salon. skin prick tests with 1:5 w/v potassium and sodium persulphate extracts were positive in our patient at 15 min and negative in control subjects. The European standard contactans (ECDRG) and a battery of hairdressing agents were patch tested with positive result to KATHON CG (isothiazolinone). The methacholine-inhalation test showed airway hyperresponsiveness. Bronchial provocation test with a 1:50 w/v potassium persulphate extract elicited a nonimmediate asthmatic reaction, followed by recurrent nocturnal fall in FEV1 lasting up to 3 days after the test. plethysmography results revealed air trapping caused by a marked increase of airway resistance 3 h after the specific bronchial challenge. histamine release test was not conclusive, and the determinations of specific IgA, IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses by EIA and IgE by RAST against persulphate salts were negative.
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ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
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10/32. Acute mercury intoxication with lichenoid drug eruption followed by mercury contact allergy and development of antinuclear antibodies.

    A 31-year-old black man was examined for evaluation of a suspected occupational disease. Three years earlier he had been suffering from acute mercury intoxication during work in a mercury recycling factory. skin symptoms then had been a lichenoid drug eruption, patchy alopecia and stomatitis, which had all disappeared rapidly after systemic glucocorticosteroid treatment. The examination revealed positive patch test reactions to metallic mercury and inorganic mercury compounds, an elevated titre of serum antinuclear antibodies and normal IgE levels. The induction of antinuclear antibodies by mercury has been shown in animal experiments. It can be hypothesized that this patient, who may have had an increased individual susceptibility, became allergic to mercury by the mercury intoxication.
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ranking = 1.0068107726063
keywords = patch test, patch
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