Cases reported "Ocular Hypotension"

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1/9. ciliary body detachment caused by capsule contraction.

    A 74-year-old woman developed capsule contraction associated with hypotony and choroidal effusion 18 months after uneventful phacoemulsification with 3-piece poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens implantation. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed ciliary body detachment and stretched zonules. A radial neodymium: YAG anterior capsulotomy was performed, resulting in the resolution of the ciliary body detachment and choroidal effusion as well as in normal intraocular pressure over 4 days.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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2/9. Ultrasound biomicroscopy of chronic hypotony after cataract extraction.

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed with a UBM 840 (Zeiss-Humphrey) equipped with a 50 MHz probe on a patient with chronic hypotony 1 year after cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in the capsular bag. This sonographic technique, which provides high-resolution imaging of the anterior segment, showed aqueous humor leakage through the former scleral tunnel incision. Ultrasound biomicroscopy helped detect this patient's postoperative complication and is a good tool for diagnostic procedures in patients with chronic hypotony.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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3/9. Choroidal effusion and hypotony caused by severe anterior lens capsule contraction following cataract surgery.

    PURPOSE: The case report describes a case of severe anterior capsular contraction associated with choroidal effusion. CASE REPORT: An 81 year old female with primary open angle glaucoma underwent routine phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Eight weeks following surgery the anterior capsule opening had reduced to 3 mm in size. intraocular pressure was found to be 4 mmHg and B scan ultrasound revealed a large choroidal effusion. Anterior capsulotomy with Nd:YAG laser was performed. At review, two weeks later, the choroidal effusion had resolved and visual acuity had recovered. DISCUSSION: The Nd:YAG laser radial relaxing capsulotomies helped relieve the capsular contraction and associated traction on the ciliary body.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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4/9. phacoemulsification, persistent hypotony, and cyclodialysis clefts.

    A retrospective noncomparative case-note analysis of 3 men presenting with persistent hypotony after routine phacoemulsification cataract surgery was performed. All patients had a previous history of significant blunt ocular trauma. All patients had surgical repair of the cyclodialysis clefts, 1 with cleft cryopexy and 2 with formal cleft closure with a limbal-based double scleral flap technique. All patients achieved closure of the cyclodialysis clefts following surgical intervention with complete resolution of hypotony. Mean preoperative intraocular pressures improved from 3, 4 and 3 mm Hg in the 3 cases to 11, 16, and 17 mm Hg postoperatively. Visual acuities improved from preoperative readings of counting fingers, 6/36 and 6/24 in the 3 cases to 6/6, 6/9, and 6/9 postoperatively. Persistent hypotony because of possible activation of a preexisting doormant cyclodialysis cleft following routine atraumatic phacoemulsification cataract surgery in previously traumatized eyes has not been reported.
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ranking = 2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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5/9. New method of surgical repair for 360-degree cyclodialysis.

    A 44-year-old man suffered traumatic 360-degree cyclodialysis in the left eye complicated by persistent hypotony, disc edema, maculopathy, and cataract. Treatment was removal of the cataract with phacoemulsification followed by insertion of a capsular tension ring with 2-point scleral suture fixation with polypropylene in the ciliary sulcus. A foldable acrylic posterior chamber intraocular lens was implanted in the capsular bag through the 4.1 mm corneal tunnel incision. The intraocular pressure responded well with resolution of hypotony, choroidal detachment, disc edema, and maculopathy. Ultrasound biomicroscopy showed complete closure of the cyclodialysis cleft.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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6/9. Anterior scleral buckling procedure for cyclodialysis cleft with chronic hypotony.

    Cyclodialysis clefts occur when the attachment of the ciliary body to the scleral spur is disrupted. The mechanism is usually traumatic or iatrogenic after phacoemulsification or other intraocular manipulation. Treatment becomes necessary when hypotony occurs, with maculopathy being the most visually significant sequela. A patient who failed conventional treatment for hypotony and eventually benefited from a novel surgery to correct his cyclodialysis cleft is described.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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7/9. Cyclodialysis cleft following a scleral tunnel incision.

    We report a case of ocular hypotony secondary to a cyclodialysis cleft that developed following a phacoemulsification procedure in which a scleral tunnel incision was used. A cyclodialysis cleft should be suspected in cases of persistent postoperative hypotony.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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8/9. Recurrent severe hypotony after cataract surgery in an eye with previous trabeculectomy.

    This report describes a patient who developed severe recurrent hypotony after uneventful phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation 4 years after trabeculectomy. Hypotony was first noticed 1 month postoperatively and treated successfully with topical steroids. However, it reappeared 2 months later and slowly subsided only with steroid and cycloplegic treatment. There was no anterior chamber shallowing, leakage, or signs of inflammation. The cause of hypotony in this patient remains unknown. One possible explanation is subclinical postoperative inflammation as a foreign-body reaction to the IOL.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
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9/9. Treatment of bleb hypotony after phacoemulsification with autologous blood.

    Hypotony from an inadvertent filtration bleb developed in the eye of a 66-year-old woman 1 year after phacoemulsification cataract surgery. The hypotony was treated with an autologous blood injection over the previous phacoemulsification incision. This technique successfully treated the hypotony without additional ocular surgery. The authors report an effective alternative treatment for hypotony induced by an inadvertent filtration bleb.
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ranking = 6
keywords = phacoemulsification
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