Cases reported "Odontogenic Cysts"

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1/17. PTCH gene mutations in odontogenic keratocysts.

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a benign cystic lesion of the jaws that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Recently, the gene for NBCCS was cloned and shown to be the human homologue of the drosophila segment polarity gene Patched (PTCH), a tumor suppressor gene. The PTCH gene encodes a transmembrane protein that acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues, including tooth. We investigated three cases of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts and three other cases associated with NBCCS, looking for mutations of the PTCH gene. Non-radioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a deletion of 5 base pairs (bp) in exon 3 (518delAAGCG) in one sporadic cyst as well as mutations in two cysts associated with NBCCS, a nonsense (C2760A) and a missense (G3499A) alteration. This report is the first to describe a somatic mutation of PTCH in sporadic odontogenic keratocysts as well as two novel mutations in cysts associated with NBCCS, indicating a similar pathogenesis in a subset of sporadic keratocysts.
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2/17. Longitudinal in vivo observations on odontogenic keratocyst over a period of 4 years.

    A case is presented of simultaneous adjacent odontogenic keratocyst and dentigerous cyst occurring in the same quadrant. Their in vivo behaviour, influence and effect on each other, surrounding tissues and on tooth development over a period of 4 years are described. This unique case may further advance the understanding of the behaviour of the odontogenic keratocyst in vivo.
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3/17. Supernumerary premolars. Report of 10 cases.

    Supernumerary premolars are "extra" teeth morphologically belonging to the premolar group. Hyperdontia affecting premolars can be single (when only one supernumerary tooth is found), multiple (if several teeth are involved) or related to a syndrome such as cleidocranial dysplasia. Supernumerary premolars are the third most frequent group of supernumerary teeth, following mesiodens and fourth molars; the prevalence among the general population ranges from 0.09-0.64%. The present study describes 10 cases of supernumerary premolars treated in our Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Dental Clinic of the University of Barcelona. A late onset was demonstrated in one case, contrasting the present pantomograph with another obtained 5 years before. In only one case did the presence of a supernumerary premolar alter normal tooth eruption. Two supernumerary premolars were affected by follicular cysts.
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keywords = tooth, eruption
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4/17. Radiological features of glandular odontogenic cyst.

    OBJECTIVES: To present five new cases of glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) and to review the radiological features at presentation as reported in the English literature. methods: From 1993 to 2002, five patients in our department were diagnosed with GOC based on histopathological findings and supported by radiography and CT. The radiographic features of the new GOC cases were analysed in addition to 51 literature cases. RESULTS: There were 31 male and 25 female patients, aged 14-90 years (mean 50 years). The mandible was involved in 80% and the maxilla in 20%; most of the lesions were located in the anterior jaw. Radiographically, 52% of the lesions were unilocular and 48% were multilocular; 94.5% showed well defined borders, which were sclerotic in 7.7% and scalloped in 13%. Information on cortical plate integrity was available in only 24 cases: 50% showed perforation, 8.3% erosion of the cortical plates and 8.3% thinning of the cortical plates. root resorption was reported in 22% of patients and tooth displacement in 24.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Data collected indicate that GOC has potentially aggressive behaviour, with expansion and perforation in a significant number of cases. We recommend the use of multiple plane radiographs, with CT reserved for large lesions, especially those that are multilocular or involve extragnathic structures.
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5/17. Maxillary odontogenic keratocyst with respiratory epithelium: a case report.

    We report a case of odontogenic keratocyst with a respiratory epithelial lining and a malformed impacted tooth in the maxilla of a 39-year-old Japanese female who suffered from swelling symptoms for half a year. CT examinations revealed an air-filled cystic lesion with an impacted tooth crown in the maxillary bone which expanded to the nasal cavity as well as to the maxillary sinus. Histopathologically, the surgically removed cyst wall consisted of fibrous granulation tissue with a lining of parakeratinized squamous epithelium as well as ciliated pseudostratified epithelium and with retention of desquamated keratin materials in the lumen. The impacted tooth was malformed lacking a root portion. We discuss the frequency of respiratory epithelium in odontogenic keratocysts.
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6/17. Odontogenic keratocyst clinically mimicking an eruption cyst: report of a case.

    This article describes a case of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) in a 1 year and 7 month old girl who presented such a lesion mimicking an eruption cyst. To date, only one well-documented OKC occurring in a patient under 5 years old has been reported and it was thought to be associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). In our OKC case, the cyst was totally enucleated. No evidence of recurrence and NBCCS was found after a 4-year follow-up. The development of involving tooth in a growing child and the histogenesis of OKC are discussed in this article.
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keywords = tooth, eruption
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7/17. Sialo-odontogenic cyst--a case report.

    Sialo-odontogenic cyst is an uncommon cyst of odontogenic origin that occurs in the tooth bearing areas of the jaws. These lesions are histopathologically unique, biologically aggressive and may sometimes warrant distinction from central muco-epidermoid carcinoma and botryoid variant of the lateral odontogenic cyst. Sialo-odontogenic cysts tend to recur and various factors are quoted for their recurrence viz., the presence of microcysts, thin connective tissue wall, etc. We are herewith reporting a case of sialo-odontogenic cyst for its relative rarity among the odontogenic cysts.
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8/17. Rapid cystic development in relation with an impacted lower third molar: a case report.

    Cystic changes can arise in relation with unerupted lower third molars. This case report describes a large odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) which developed rapidly and aggressively over a short period of 2 years and presented with acute symptoms. The development of a large OKC over the mandible is evidenced by radiographs taken 2 years apart. The OKC was enucleated and the residual cavity was treated with Carnoy's solution and packed with bismuth iodoform paraffin paste dressing. The impacted third molar and second molar associated with the lesion were also extracted. This case illustrates how rapidly a cyst can develop in association with a previously asymptomatic, unerupted tooth and how quickly a radiographic diagnosis can become out of date. As such, the authors recommend the use of repeated radiographs for monitoring unerupted teeth at a tighter time frame of 6 to 12 months.
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9/17. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with an impacted maxillary second premolar and odontogenic keratocyst in the maxillary sinus.

    An eight-year-, four-month-old girl was brought to the orthodontic clinic of Okayama University Medical and Dental Hospital. The patient had an impacted upper left second premolar because of an odontogenic keratocyst and showed a skeletal Class II jaw base relationship. At the age of six years four months, marsupialization of a cyst was performed at the Okayama University Medical and Dental Hospital because the patient had shown a swelling of the left cheek because of the cyst. The upper left second premolar was located in the roof of the maxillary sinus. The cyst was histopathologically diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst. At the age of nine years 10 months and after regaining the space for eruption of the premolar, the impacted premolar erupted without traction. At the age of 12 years five months, edgewise treatment was initiated, which continued for three years. After removing the edgewise appliance, an optimum occlusion was achieved. The occlusion was maintained without recurrence of the keratocyst after a retention period of five years.
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keywords = eruption
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10/17. Odontogenic keratocyst in maxillary sinus with invasive behaviour.

    Odontogenic keratocyst is a cystic lesion characterized by a high rate of recurrence. This report describes a rare case of ciliated epithelium-lined odontogenic keratocyst in the maxilla of a 27-year-old female. Panoramic radiography showed a lytic lesion on the right maxilla associated with an impacted molar tooth. Computerized tomography image revealed the involvement of the lesion with the right maxillary sinus, destroying the sinus floor. Histopathologically, the typical keratinized epithelial-lined cyst of odontogenic keratocyst abruptly changed into a ciliated epithelium, suggesting the fusion of both these epithelia rather a metaplastic transformation. The biological behaviour of odontogenic keratocysts is discussed.
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