Cases reported "Olfaction Disorders"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/26. Disabling disturbance of olfaction in a dental technician following exposure to methyl methacrylate.

    It is often difficult to diagnose dysosmia due to occupational olfactotoxic substances. The authors present a case of disabling disturbance of olfaction in a dental technician. This is very likely to have been caused by exposure to methyl methacrylate. From 1988-1992, the dental technician had very extensive and sustained contact with a self-polymerizing acrylic resin based on methyl methacrylate. Her perception of smell was still normal in 1988, but it deteriorated up to 1992. The olfactory disorders have persisted and impede social life and occupational rehabilitation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/26. Rare cause for short stature--Kallmann's syndrome--a case report.

    Kallmann's syndrome is a neuroendocrine disorder, characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with hyposmia. We report a 27 year old male who presented with short stature and pain in the lumbar region. On detailed evaluation he had growth retardation, features of hypothalamic hypogonadism as evidenced by endocrimological tests and anosmia since birth. He had co-existent caries spine T10,T11 causing pain in the lumbar region-MRI brain showed normal olfactory pathway while the response to nasal stimulants was markedly attenuated. We present this case for its very care occurrence in the eastern part of the world and the typical feature being normal MRI brain with functional defect of the olfactory pathway.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5.0647241922815
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/26. Neural-dural transition at the medial anterior cranial base: an anatomical and histological study with clinical applications.

    OBJECT: Few anatomical studies have been focused on the morphological features and microscopic anatomy of the transition from the intracranial space to the medial anterior cranial base. The authors of the current study performed histological analyses to define the structure of the transition from neural foramina to the cranial base (neural-dural transition) at the cribriform plate, particularly as related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula formation and surgical intervention in the region. methods: The medial anterior cranial base was resected in six cadaveric specimens. Histological methods were used to study the anatomy of the region on the microscopic level. Results of these examinations revealed a multilayered neural-dural transition at the cribriform plate, which consisted of an arachnoid membrane and a potential subarachnoid space as well as dura mater, periosteum, ethmoid bone, and associated layers of submucosa and mucosa of the paranasal air spaces. A subarachnoid space was identified around the olfactory nerves as they exited the neural foramina of the cribriform plates. The dura mater eventually thinned out and became continuous with the periosteum in the ethmoid bone. The dura, arachnoid membrane, and associated potential subarachnoid space were obliterated at a place 1 to 2 mm into the olfactory foramen. The authors present a case of recurrent CSF rhinorrhea successfully treated using a technique of multilayered reconstruction with pericranium, fat, and bone. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an anatomical basis for CSF fistula formation in the region of the cribriform plate and help to explain the unusual presentations in patients who have CSF rhinorrhea and meningitis. These results may facilitate the treatment of CSF fistulas, repair of defects in the medial anterior cranial base, and approaches to tumors and other pathological entities in the region.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5.0647241922815
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/26. Cranio-nasal median splitting for radical resection of craniopharyngioma.

    A new surgical approach for radical resection of craniopharyngioma is presented. This approach (cranio-nasal median splitting) involves craniotomy in the centre of the frontal bone, removal of the median portion of the supraorbital bar that incorporates the nasal bone, and detachment of the medial canthal ligaments. The frontal lobes, the cribriform plates, the planum sphenoidale, and the upper nasal cavities are split in the midline. The extraventricular surface of the hypothalamus, the pituitary stalk, and the posterior portion of the Willis' arterial ring are well visualized through the midline infrachiasmatic route. The intraventricular surface of the hypothalamus is also visible in the same operative field through the lamina terminalis and/or the anterior portion of the corpus callosum. This excellent visualization is quite helpful for minimizing operative injury to the hypothalamus and the pituitary stalk whichever surface of the third ventricular floor the tumour is situated upon. Three cases of craniopharyngioma operated upon by this approach are presented. Discussions are focused not only on the indication, but on the advantages and disadvantages of this approach. The surgical techniques for reconstruction of the cranial base are also described, together with some precautions that should be taken to prevent possible postoperative complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 35.45306934597
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/26. Olfactory loss and allergic rhinitis.

    Olfactory loss is of importance for allergists to investigate in their patients, because if it is due to either allergic rhinitis or nonallergic rhinitis, it is potentially reversible. One should be sure to consider nasal polyposis and inflammation from chronic sinusitis, especially of the ethmoidal sinuses. Simple screening in the office can be achieved with an odor identification test of widely available substances as described above. Should there be no response to treatment or if the patient has a history of chronic sinusitis, recalcitrant nasal polyposis, or previous otolaryngologic procedures, further evaluation including rhinoscopy may be required. Recent olfactory loss in the absence of nasal symptoms and in the absence of abnormalities in the nasal cavity should suggest further investigation to look for a more central process. Morphologic investigation with electron microscopy of the olfactory epithelium and the superior nasal cavity is just beginning. The impact of inflammation in this area awaits investigation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 25.323620961407
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/26. Wegener's granulomatosis in a patient with a rheumatoid arthritis.

    A 38-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis who developed Wegener's granulomatosis is described. Wegener's granulomatosis appeared with saddle nose, perforation in her nasal septum, and granuloma in the nasal cavity. Laboratory evaluation showed a positive rheumatoid factor and circulating immune complex. Radiographic examination revealed ankylotic changes in both wrist and elbow joints. Bilateral anosmia and other disease manifestations completely responded to treatment with oral cyclophosphamide and prednisolone.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 11.129448384563
keywords = nasal, nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/26. Organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus.

    OBJECTIVE: Organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus can develop by means of organization of hematoma in the unaerated maxillary sinus. To our knowledge, this is only the second article describing organized hematoma in the maxillary sinus. MATERIAL AND methods: We have observed eight cases of organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus recently and here we describe the clinical features (using CT scans and medical records), radiologic characteristics and pathologic findings. RESULTS: The patients comprised five males and three females (mean age 58 years), all of whom had a history of frequent epistaxis. They also complained of nasal obstruction, hyposmia, headache and swollen cheeks. Rhinoscopy revealed obliterated nasal cavities due to bulging lateral walls. CT scans showed soft-tissue densities expanding the maxillary sinus into the nasal cavity. The treatment modalities used (applied either alone or in combination) were Denker's operation, Caldwell-Luc's operation and endonasal endoscopic surgery, and the outcomes were successful. CONCLUSION: Organized hematoma should be included in the differential diagnosis when patients have frequent epistaxis and an expansile mass in the maxillary sinus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 20.258896769126
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/26. Acute hyposmia in type 2 diabetes.

    During treatment for type 2 diabetes with a diabetic diet (without medication), a 61-year-old Japanese man suddenly developed hyposmia. The fasting plasma glucose was 208 mg/dl and haemoglobin A1c was 8.6%. On investigation, there were no indications of disease of the brain, or the nasal or paranasal sinuses. The intravenous olfaction test yielded no response, indicating suspected neural hyposmia. After 6 months, the symptoms of hyposmia improved without medication, and the intravenous olfaction test results were normal. This clinical course is very similar to that seen with diabetic neuropathy of the third and sixth cranial nerves. We speculate that hyposmia in this case may have been caused by diabetic mononeuropathy of the first cranial nerve.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 10.129448384563
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/26. Anosmia after intranasal zinc gluconate use.

    BACKGROUND: zinc is an essential mineral. Beneficial zinc absorption takes place via enteral, parenteral, or cutaneous routes. However, direct application to the olfactory epithelium has been reported to cause loss of smell. Recently, intranasal zinc gluconate has been recommended as a treatment for the common cold. Severe posttreatment hyposmia and anosmia have been observed. methods: The case report of a typical patient is presented and analyzed in detail, followed by a series of patients with severe hyposmia or anosmia after the use of intranasal zinc gluconate. RESULTS: Although interindividual variation in drug response and drug effect is apparent, the severe hyposmia or anosmia appears to be long lasting or permanent in some cases. The mechanism of olfactory loss is thought to be the direct action of the divalent zinc ion on the olfactory receptor cell. CONCLUSIONS: zinc ions are toxic to olfactory epithelium. Reports of severe hyposmia with parosmia or anosmia have occurred after intranasal use of zinc gluconate.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 35.45306934597
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/26. Rosai-Dorfman disease revealed in the upper airway: a case report and review of the literature.

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a systemic disease and its etiology is not well understood. It is a very rare but established disease. We report a case of RDD diagnosed in the upper airway that became a life-threatening condition because of the stricture of the subglottic space. A 49-year-old female complained of nasal obstruction, hoarseness and lacrimation. After evaluation following by fiberscopic examination and CT scanning of the head and neck, sinusitis and laryngeal masses were detected. Endoscopic sinus surgery and endolaryngeal microsurgery were performed simultaneously. The masses in the nasal cavity and larynx showed the same histological findings. Proliferative large histiocytes with voluminous clear cytoplasm and rounded nuclei, and lymphophagocytosis known as emperipolesis are the characteristic features of RDD. In this case, extranodal manifestations in the subglottic space gradually emerged postoperatively. tracheotomy was performed to ensure an airway and prevent suffocation. An extensive treatment is not required in most patients with RDD, however, some patients who have extranodal manifestations involving the airway may detoriorate into a life-threatening condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 11.129448384563
keywords = nasal, nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Olfaction Disorders'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.