Cases reported "Optic Nerve Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/42. Surgical management of lesions affecting the anterior optic pathways.

    Although benign neoplasms are the most common lesions of the anterior visual pathways that lend themselves to a combined neurosurgical and ophthalmic surgical treatment, malignant neoplasms, infections (especially fungal), and vascular lesions are also sometimes treated via a combined approach. Recent advances in the field of skull base surgery have made it possible to treat complicated lesions in precarious locations with increasing margins of safety and decreasing morbidity. The role of the neurosurgeon in managing selected patients with lesions of the anterior a visual pathway should not be underestimated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/42. Inefficiency of the anticoagulant therapy in the regression of the radiation-induced optic neuropathy in Cushing's disease.

    Radiation-induced optic neuropathy is a rare complication (prevalence less than 1%) following radiotherapy of the sellar region. However, the vasculopathy in Cushing's disease predisposes to radiation-induced injury. We report the case of a 24-year-old man with Cushing's disease since he was 16. The hormonal study including bilateral inferior petrosal sinus catheterization diagnosed a pituitary right lesion, but imagiology was always negative. He underwent a transsphenoidal microadenomectomy and the pathological study showed the presence of corticotrophic hyperplasia but no adenoma. Secondary hypothyroidism and hypogonadism as well as permanent diabetes insipidus were diagnosed and because the patient was not cured he underwent a second transsphenoidal total hypophysectomy. After that and because he was still hypercortisolemic, pituitary external irradiation was given in a total dose of 6000 rad. Six months later he developed progressive bilateral visual loss. Cerebral MR revealed focal enhancement of the enlarged optic nerves and chiasm, associated with demyelination areas of the posterior visual pathways. Treatment was tried first with high doses of corticosteroids and later with anticoagulants-heparin EV. 1000 U/h during 7 days followed by warfarin, but unsuccessfully, probably because the patient was already amaurotic at the beginning of the last treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5097.7456972659
keywords = radiation-induced
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/42. optic nerve sheath fenestration for a reversible optic neuropathy in radiation oncology.

    To the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of published accounts of management of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) by optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) in the conventional medical literature. With higher doses of radiation being given by using conformal techniques, more radiation-induced optic neuritis and neuropathy will be identified. We report here the successful use of ONSF to restore vision to three consecutive patients with pending anterior RION, and the importance of early identification and intervention in these potentially reversible cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2039.0982789064
keywords = radiation-induced
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/42. Unusual presentation of multiple myeloma with unilateral visual loss and numb chin syndrome in a young adult.

    A 39-year-old man presented with unilateral visual loss as the first sign of multiple myeloma (MM). His visual loss was due to a plasmacytoma in the sphenoid sinus compressing the optic nerve with resultant optic nerve atrophy. Shortly after this presentation he developed numb chin syndrome due to a mandibular plasmocytoma compressing the mental nerve. His MM progressed rapidly despite treatment with high-dose steroids and alkylating agents and he required allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in order to achieve a remission. We reviewed the published medical literature on the presentation of MM with visual impairment and present a summary in tabular form in this paper. This is the first reported case of MM presenting with isolated complete visual loss due to intracranial extrinsic compression of the optic nerve since the advent of modern cross-sectional imaging. multiple myeloma needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of cranial neuropathies and skull base neoplasms even in adults under 40 years of age.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/42. Vision recovery following nasopharyngeal angiofibroma excision.

    'Juvenile' nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a locally aggressive, yet histologically benign, vascular neoplasm. This neoplasm accounts for less than 0.5% of head and neck neoplasms. We report an unique case of a 14-year-old male with a nasopharyngeal angiofibroma compressing the optic nerve and causing great visual impairment. The tumor was a red lobulated mass in left nostril, invading maxillary sinus, anterior and posterior ethmoid sinus, sphenoid sinus, and cavum area. Midfacial degloving approach and total excision of the tumor resulted in almost completely visual recovery. optic nerve decompression was not performed. We consider that an early diagnosis, an adequate approach, total tumor excision, and efforts by a team of sub-specialists are most likely to yield optimal results.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/42. Optic neuropathy in cancer patients. Report of a case possibly related to 5 fluorouracil toxicity and review of the literature.

    We report the case of a 72-year-old woman suffering from bone metastatic breast cancer and treated with continuous intravenous 5 fluorouracil (5FU) chemotherapy, who presented with a bilateral asymmetric anterior optic neuropathy (ON). A deficiency of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was documented. patients with DPD deficiency are at increased risk for developing unusual and/or severe toxicity to 5FU. We discuss the differential diagnosis of anterior ON and we suggest that 5FU can be responsible for optic nerve toxicity in patients with DPD deficiency.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.81358947795144
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/42. Malignant astrocytoma of the optic nerve in a child.

    Malignant gliomas of optic nerve and chiasm are rare, rapidly fatal neoplasms of adulthood. This report documents the occurrence of a malignant astrocytoma of the optic nerve in an 11-year-old boy who 9 years previously had a cerebellar medulloblastoma treated with surgery and irradiation. This malignant optic nerve glioma followed the same aggressive clinical course as that seen in adults, with death 9 months after diagnosis despite surgery and chemotherapy. Radiation may have been an important factor in the development of this malignant tumor which is almost never seen in the pediatric age group.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/42. tamoxifen optic neuropathy.

    A 68-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer presented with slowly progressive visual loss in each eye. electrophysiology confirmed bilateral optic neuropathies. Investigations to determine the cause of the vision loss were negative. Cessation of tamoxifen resulted in a dramatic improvement in acuity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16271789559029
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/42. Optic neuropathy secondary to radiotherapy for nasal melanoma.

    Optic neuropathy is a rare but important complication of radiotherapy used in the treatment of cancers of the head and neck, usually resulting in rapidly progressive blindness in one or both eyes. The case is presented of a 77-year-old woman with bilateral optic neuropathy resulting in blindness, secondary to radiotherapy for a melanoma of the nasal cavity. The onset of optic neuropathy occurred 9 months post-radiotherapy, at a cumulative dose of 6000 rad. The left eye was first involved, with the right eye becoming involved within 2 weeks. Despite treatment with oral anticoagulation and high dose intravenous methylprednisolone, there was progressive deterioration resulting in bilateral optic atrophy, with final visual acuities of perception of light in the right eye and no perception of light in the left eye. This case demonstrates that oral anticoagulation was ineffective in the treatment of progressive radiation-induced optic neuropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1019.7118573488
keywords = radiation-induced, cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/42. Visual loss despite anticoagulation in radiation-induced optic neuropathy.

    Radiation therapy to the brain may produce necrosis and loss of function months after completion of the treatment. The case is presented of a 62-year-old man who developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy 2 years after treatment for a glioma of the left temporal lobe, despite being on anticoagulation therapy. Although anticoagulation appears to be beneficial in cerebral radiation necrosis, its usefulness in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy is unclear.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6117.2948367191
keywords = radiation-induced
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Optic Nerve Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.