Cases reported "Optic Neuritis"

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1/336. Bilateral optic neuritis in a child diagnosed with Gd-enhanced MR imaging using fat-suppression technique.

    A 4-year-old boy developed bilateral optic neuritis. Although precise neuro-ophthalmological evaluation was difficult, the diagnosis was made with gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging using fat-suppression technique in the initial stage of the disease. Enhancement and enlargement of the intraorbital and intracanalicular optic nerve were demonstrated bilaterally as well as protrusion of the optic nerve head. The disease responded dramatically to intravenous steroid therapy. The etiologies in children usually differ from those in adolescent and adult patients.
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2/336. Unusual combination of night blindness and optic neuropathy after biliopancreatic bypass.

    night blindness and optic neuropathy were the presenting symptoms of an iatrogenic malabsorption syndrome in a 64-year old female. This case illustrates the necessity of lifelong vitamin supplementation after biliopancreatic bypass for morbid obesity.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = optic
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3/336. Is sphenoid sinus opacity significant in patients with optic neuritis?

    PURPOSE: optic neuritis secondary to sinus disease is an infrequent but well-documented association. When a patient presents with signs of optic nerve dysfunction and orbital inflammation the significance of widespread sinus disease on radiology is clear and the management is straightforward. We present a group of patients with isolated optic neuritis and radiological evidence of spheno-ethmoiditis and discuss the clinical relevance of this finding. methods: We reviewed the notes of 11 patients with optic neuritis who, because of atypical headache, underwent neuroimaging revealing sphenoid sinus opacity. Six patients had endoscopic drainage of the sphenoid sinus; 4 were treated medically. RESULTS: Sinus contents included fungal infection (2), mucopurulent material (5), polyps (1) and necrotic tumour (1). Narrowing of the optic canal due to chronic osteomyelitis was found in 1 patient with irreversible optic atrophy. Visual loss was reversible in 6 patients. Four patients had normal radiological findings after treatment. Two patients had recurrent optic neuritis with sphenoid sinusitis on MRI scan, resolving on treatment, during the 4 year follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Possible mechanisms of nerve damage in this situation include direct spread of infection, occlusive vasculitis and bony deficiency in the wall of the sinus. patients presenting with isolated optic neuritis and atypical headache should be scanned; an opaque sphenoid sinus in the context of visual loss should not be dismissed as coincidental but assumed to be pathological and the patient referred for drainage. sphenoid sinusitis is an uncommon but treatable cause of optic neuritis.
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ranking = 1.7151620462868
keywords = optic, optic atrophy, atrophy
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4/336. Hughes-Stovin syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    A young man presented with prolonged pyrexia, recurrent optic neuritis, thrombophlebitis and bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms with thrombus formation. The life-threatening hemoptysis necessitated mechanical ventilatory support and emergency left lower lobectomy. Systemic corticosteroids conferred clinical improvement and reduction of the remaining right pulmonary artery aneurysm. The patient eventually succumbed to sudden massive hemoptysis. This report underscores the unpredictable nature of this syndrome and emphasises the need for aggressive surgical intervention of pulmonary artery aneurysms in Hughes-Stovin syndrome.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = optic
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5/336. Optic-spinal form of multiple sclerosis and anti-thyroid autoantibodies.

    The optic-spinal form of multiple sclerosis (OSMS), characterized by recurrent involvement of optic nerve and spinal cord with rare brain magnetic resonance imaging lesions, is relatively common among Asians. While individual cases of OSMS with anti-thyroid autoantibodies (ATABs) have been reported, the frequency of ATAbs in OSMS and classical multiple sclerosis has not been studied. We studied serum ATAbs and anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) in 46 Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis: 14 with OSMS, and 32 with non-OSMS. Six patients were positive for ATAbs: five women with OSMS and one man with non-OSMS. The frequency of ATAbs in OSMS (5/14) was significantly higher than that in non-OSMS (1/32; P = 0.007), but the frequency of ANA did not differ between OSMS (3/14) and non-OSMS (6/32; P = 0.99). There may be a pathogenetic link between anti-thyroid autoimmunity and a subgroup of OSMS in Japanese.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = optic
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6/336. Pachymeningitis and optic neuritis in rheumatoid arthritis: MRI findings.

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease in which cerebral and eye involvement is neither common nor fully understood. Although it is rarely the cause of pachymeningitis and optic neuritis, rheumatoid arthritis should always be kept in mind in these two conditions. We present a 52-year-old male with an 8 month history of rheumatoid arthritis who was referred to the neurology department with headache and decreasing vision and was diagnosed as having rheumatoid pachymeningitis and optic neuritis on the basis of MRI findings.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = optic
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7/336. Tuberculous neuroretinitis.

    OBJECTIVES: To describe a patient with tuberculous neuroretinitis. MATERIALS AND methods: Retrospective case report. RESULTS: We describe a 43-year-old otherwise asymptomatic woman with a known exposure to tuberculosis who had unilateral optic disc edema and a partial macular star (neuroretinitis). This was followed approximately 1 year later by the development of an exudative retinal detachment in the setting of bilateral multifocal choroiditis. Laboratory testing revealed a marked positive cutaneous reaction to purified protein derivative (PPD). Treatment with antituberculosis medicine alone resulted in prompt resolution of the choroidal infiltrates and complete flattening of the exudative detachment. CONCLUSIONS: tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with neuroretinitis.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = optic
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8/336. Das multifokale elektroretinogramm in der diagnostik und verlaufskontrolle lokalisierter Netzhautfunktionsstorungen: fallbericht eines patienten mit chorioretinopathia centralis serosa.

    The role of multifocal electroretinography (MF-ERG) in the diagnosis and follow-up of localized areas of retinal dysfunction is discussed. A 42-year-old male with the preliminary diagnosis of optic neuritis in his left eye was referred for evaluation with the MF-ERG. Simultaneous cone ERGs were obtained from 103 locations within the central 50 degrees of the retina. During an 8-month follow-up four MF-ERGs were obtained. Bilaterally reduced paracentral response amplitudes contradicted the preliminary diagnosis. Subsequently central serous chorioretinopathy was diagnosed. Follow-up showed normalization of the MF-ERG responses in the left eye while retinal function in the right eye showed initial worsening. The noninvasive MF-ERG lends itself to follow-up in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = optic
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9/336. Optic neuropathy occurring after bee and wasp sting.

    OBJECTIVE: To inform ophthalmologists about bee and wasp sting-related optic neuropathy. DESIGN: Two case reports and literature review. methods: review of two cases, clinical history, laboratory testing, and follow-up. RESULTS: Two cases of bee and wasp sting optic neuritis are described and five additional cases of optic neuritis occurring after hymenoptera sting are reviewed from the English language literature. These cases share certain characteristics, including acute to subacute onset of symptoms; moderate to severe visual loss followed by significant visual recovery; edematous and hemorrhagic optic discs; and central or cecocentral scotomas. CONCLUSIONS: Acute optic neuropathy may follow hymenoptera sting to the face.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = optic
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10/336. Ocular toxicity of systemic medications: a case series.

    BACKGROUND: There are many visually threatening conditions that may result from long-term use of systemic medications. Many of these adverse side effects can be greatly reduced or prevented with close monitoring of patients. In view of current knowledge, updated clinical guidelines for appropriate monitoring of ocular toxicity from systemic medications need to be developed for the eye care practitioner. CASE review: There have been many reports of ocular toxicity from isoniazid, thioridazine, steroids, and amiodarone therapy. Clinical cases illustrating possible adverse ocular side effects are presented, which include INH-induced optic neuropathy, phenothiazine-induced retinopathy, steroid-induced glaucoma, and vortex epitheliopathy secondary to amiodarone. CONCLUSION: Optometrists should be aware of the potential for ocular side effects from systemic medications. eye care guidelines for monitoring ocular side effects from thioridazine, INH, steroids, and amiodarone use are suggested.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = optic
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