Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/90. myocardial infarction and coronary artery involvement in giant cell arteritis.

    PURPOSE: To describe the pathologic findings in an unusual case of giant cell arteritis that presented initially with visual loss and rapidly culminated in myocardial infarction. CASE REPORT: After the death of the patient, a complete autopsy was performed, including bilateral enucleation. All specimens, including a temporal artery biopsy completed before the patients death, were processed for routine paraffin histology and initially stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Elastic stains were subsequently used on specimens of temporal and coronary artery. The patient presented with loss of vision in the right eye. The clinical diagnosis was anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, secondary to temporal arteritis. The temporal artery biopsy was positive. Despite high-dose corticosteroid administration, the patient progressed to neurologic impairment, and subsequently to a fatal myocardial infarction. DISCUSSION: Previous reports of temporal arteritis with coronary involvement are summarized. myocardial infarction may be a more common early complication of temporal arteritis than appreciated previously. This important complication can occur despite administration of high-dose corticosteroid therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/90. Lessons to be learned: a case study approach--a case of temporal arteritis.

    A 71-year-old male presented with a history of sudden partial visual loss in the right eye with an inferior visual field defect over the past 3-4 days. He had no history of headache or of facial pain. Clinical examination confirmed that vision on the right side was reduced to 6/18 and on the left to 6/12. The right eye showed a relative afferent pupillary defect. There was no other abnormality of the anterior segment of either eye. The right retina showed a pale swollen optic disc and a provisional diagnosis of anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AION) was made. An urgent erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was ordered and the patient was asked to return to the eye clinic in one month. However, 16 days later--when it was first recognised that his ESR was elevated to 75 mm in the first hour--the patient was recalled immediately in order to commence systemic steroid treatment; but regrettably, by this time, his right eye had become totally blind. In this case, although the attending doctor made a correct clinical diagnosis on presentation, he failed to act upon the result of the blood test.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/90. Acute unilateral visual loss due to a single intranasal methamphetamine abuse.

    An otherwise healthy 35 year old male with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) presented himself three days after a single intranasal methamphetamine abusus. Directly upon awakening the day after the recreational use of this drug, he discovered an acute and severe visual loss of his right eye. This unilateral loss of vision was permanent and eventually lead to a pale and atrophic optic nerve head. The characteristics of this visual loss, together with the aspect of the optic nerve head was very similar to the classical non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We suggest a direct ischemic episode to the short posterior ciliary arteries due to this single intranasal abuse of methamphetamine as the underlying pathogenesis of this acute and permanent visual loss.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/90. Bilateral simultaneous optic nerve dysfunction after periorbital trauma: recovery of vision in association with with chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the recovery of optic nerve function after chiropractic spinal manipulation in a patient with loss of vision as a result of facial fracture from a fall. CLINICAL FEATURES: In a fall down a stairwell, a 53-year-old woman with migraines fractured her right zygomatic arch, which was later treated surgically. Approximately 3 weeks after the accident, vision in her contralateral eye became reduced to light perception. Electrophysiologic studies revealed that the function of both optic nerves was diminished, the right significantly more than the left. Single photon emission tomography showed pancerebral ischemic foci. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: chiropractic spinal manipulation was used to aid recovery of vision to normal over a course of 20 treatment sessions. At times, significant improvement in vision occurred immediately after spinal manipulation. Progressive recovery of vision was monitored by serial visual field tests and by electrophysiologic studies. Unfortunately, the patient refused a further single photon emission tomographic study when visual recovery was complete. CONCLUSION: This case report adds to previous accounts of progressive and expeditious recovery of optic nerve function in association with spinal manipulation therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/90. The diagnostic challenge of occult large vessel ischemia of the retina and choroid.

    Vascular occlusions of the retina and choroid can cause severe visual loss. These occlusions can occur as a result of systemic disease or after surgery. In most cases, the retinal appearance provides evidence of ischemia as the cause of visual loss. On occasion, however, clinical examination shows no objective signs of vascular occlusion, and this can lead the clinician to suspect optic nerve pathology as the cause of visual loss. This paper outlines some of the diagnostic criteria, clinical findings, and ancillary studies that can be used to differentiate between occult occlusion of the retina or choroid and optic nerve disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/90. Loss of vision from distant haemorrhage: report of four cases.

    To describe the occurrence of visual loss from ischaemia of the optic nerve following distant haemorrhages. Four patients who sustained vision loss following distant haemorrhage, presenting to the neuro-ophthalmic clinic of the department of ophthalmology, Addis Ababa University, from 1995 to 1997 were evaluated. The clinical presentation, management and prognosis are discussed. Post-haemorrhagic vision loss, other than being a rare occurrence, is under-reported due to the fact that these patients are very sick with massive blood loss and hence little attention is given to the vision loss by attending physicians and sometimes even the patients themselves. It is hoped that this paper will increase awareness about this condition among physicians attending to patients with severe bleeding and thus facilitate early diagnosis and referral.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/90. A case of optic neuropathy treated by percutaneous trans-coronary angiography.

    There are many risk factors involved in the development of ischemic optic neuropathy such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and vascular incompetence. Therefore, the treatment of ischemic optic neuropathy should not be solely based on proper diagnosis but should also involve a thorough and systemic investigation to identify those multifactorial possibilities, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We report upon a patient who developed non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy following treatment of a sphenoethmoid mucocele, which lead to recovered vision and a satisfactory improvement of visual field defects, after percutaneous trans-coronary angiography with stent insertion of the coronary arteries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/90. giant cell arteritis causing bilateral sequential anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy--a case report.

    giant cell arteritis is a chronic granulomatous inflammation of unknown aetiology involving large and medium size arteries in the elderly. It causes acute visual loss from ischaemia to the optic nerves or central retinal artery occlusion. This is a rare cause of anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy in our local population. We present a patient who had bilateral loss of vision from sequential arteritic ischaemic optic neuropathy. She was treated with intravenous steroids immediately. Diagnosis was based on histopathological studies of temporal artery biopsies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/90. Bilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in a patient with autoimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PURPOSE: To describe a patient with bilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and idiopathic autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) with an extremely low platelet count. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: Remarkably good recovery of visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy can develop in the presence of a very low platelet count.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/90. Anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy associated with central retinal vein occlusion.

    PURPOSE: To report the unusual association between non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and non-ischaemic central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in two patients. methods: case reports are presented. RESULTS: Non-ischaemic CRVO was manifested by dilated, tortuous retinal veins with flame-shape retinal haemorrhages. fluorescein angiography showed prolonged arteriovenous transit time and normal retinal capillary perfusion without macular oedema. The presence of colour vision abnormalities, relative afferent pupillary defects, pale disc swelling and visual field deficits indicated that the visual loss was attributable entirely to NAION. Laboratory investigations disclosed impaired fibrinolytic function in case 1 and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in case 2. CONCLUSIONS: Compression of the central retinal vein by the swollen optic nerve could have predisposed to CRVO. The presence of thrombophilic abnormalities may have contributed to the concomitant occlusion of posterior ciliary arteries and central retinal vein. Ischaemic optic neuropathy needs to be considered in patients with CRVO when the visual acuity is not consistent with the retinal pathology.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = visual
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Optic Neuropathy, Ischemic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.