Cases reported "Oral Fistula"

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21/32. Palatal perforations: past and present. Two case reports and a literature review.

    syphilis and cocaine abuse are posing a growing public health problem on a global and national scale. Clinicians are increasingly likely to come across associated oral manifestations. We present two cases of palatal perforations caused by tertiary syphilis and cocaine abuse respectively. The literature review discusses issues specific to palatal perforations and those general to both conditions. The purpose of the report is to focus attention on syphilis and cocaine abuse as rising problems for the dental profession.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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22/32. cleft palate fistula closure with a mucosal prelaminated lateral upper arm flap.

    BACKGROUND: Recurrent cleft palate fistula is a challenge for maxillofacial surgeons. In severe cases, microvascular tissue transfer is necessary to treat these patients successfully. methods: A 23-year-old man with cleft lip and palate, previously treated elsewhere, presented with a 2-cm defect in the posterior hard palate. A tongue flap had already been performed. It was decided to close the persistent fistula with a lateral upper-arm flap. In a first-step operation, a free graft of buccal mucosa was fixed to the lateral upper arm subcutaneously and covered with an alloplastic sheet. After 11 weeks, the prelaminated flap was harvested and transferred to the palate. RESULTS: Integration of the buccal mucosa to the upper arm was uneventful. On harvesting the flap, we found a smooth, thin, and continuous fasciomucosal flap with a mucosa surface of 4 x 4 cm. Healing of the microvascular flap in its recipient site was regular. The fistula was closed successfully. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a lateral upper-arm flap prelaminated with autologous mucosa. By prelamination, it is possible to circumvent the disadvantage of extraoral skin within the oral cavity and to cover mucosal defects with mucosa, especially in elective procedures, such as cleft cases.
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ranking = 4768.2448700562
keywords = fistula
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23/32. Rhinolithiasis as cause of oronasal fistula.

    Rhinolithiasis is a disease caused by deposition of organic and inorganic compounds in the nasal cavity, leading to unilateral nasal obstruction, fetid rhinorrhea, epistaxis, and it may cause complications. The authors present a case of rhinolithiasis with oronasal fistula and literature review.
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ranking = 3405.8891928973
keywords = fistula
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24/32. Orthodontic treatment in a patient with Van der Woude's syndrome.

    Van der Woude's syndrome (VDW; #OMIM 119300) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by cleft lip and/or palate and lower lip pit (fistula). The precise skeletal characteristics are unclear, and there have been no case reports of orthodontic treatment of patients with VDW. The Japanese girl whose treatment is reported here had VDW, including bilateral cleft lip and palate and bilateral symmetric lower lip pits. Orthodontic treatment started when she was just 3 years old, with a removable maxillary expansion appliance, followed by an edgewise multibracket appliance in both arches. Retention began at 11 years of age, and a secondary bone graft was performed for the alveolar cleft. She received prosthetic treatment and achieved a desirable occlusion at 18 years of age. Early intervention helped achieve a satisfactory treatment result for our patient. In contrast, her mother also had VDW, with a severe Class III skeletal pattern, but she had not been treated orthodontically; she had an anterior and lateral crossbite even after prosthetic treatment. The pretreatment characteristics of 4 other subjects with VDW are discussed; they show wide variations in the sizes of the maxilla and the mandible, suggesting that a common skeletal pattern is not generally seen in VDW.
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ranking = 681.17783857945
keywords = fistula
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25/32. Use of the palatal flap for closure of an oronasal fistula.

    palatal obturators are frequently used in the initial treatment of postoperative palatal fistulae to address the associated problems experienced with speech and swallowing. Many reconstructive surgical techniques for palatal defects have been reported. Although palatal-based flaps are less frequently reported, they can offer a relatively simple reconstructive option with minimal morbidity in patients with acquired palatal defects. We present a case report of a patient requiring reconstruction of a midline oronasal fistula after resection of a palatal malignancy and review the literature concerning this technique.
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ranking = 4087.0670314767
keywords = fistula
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26/32. Congenital isolated midline sinus of the upper lip: clinical and embryological approaches.

    OBJECTIVES: Congenital sinuses or fistulas of the lip are uncommon malformations, yet true medial upper-lip fistulas (MULFs) are extremely rare. We present a new case of congenital upper-lip fistula located in the midline of the philtrum of an 8-month-old girl. INTERVENTION: Complete surgical removal was performed with a combined extra- and intraoral approach. Histological examination revealed that the fistula was lined by squamous epithelium with sebaceous and mucous glands and hair follicles. RESULTS: Several embryological hypotheses have been proposed concerning these anomalies. This article reexamines and discusses major embryological theories on pathogenesis of sinuses or fistulas of the upper lip. We propose that early ectodermal inclusion events may occur in the medial fusion area during formation of the intermaxillary process. This embryological approach is highly concordant with our recent hypothesis on nasal dermoid sinus cysts (NDSCs) pathogenesis, in which we proposed an embryological hypothesis with early ectodermal inclusion phenomenon in the midline suture area to explain NDSCs pathogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: Common early ectodermal inclusion phenomena could be involved in both NDSCs and MULFs pathogenesis.
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ranking = 3405.8891928973
keywords = fistula
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27/32. The use of decellularized dermal grafting (AlloDerm) in persistent oro-nasal fistulas after tertiary cleft palate repair.

    To assess the efficacy of decellularized dermal grafting as an adjunct to the closure of recurrent oro-nasal fistulas. Five consecutive patients with recurrent oro-nasal fistulas were repaired with decellularized dermal grafting sandwiched between oral and nasal flaps of a von Langenbeck palatal repair. All patients had previously undergone a minimum of three prior palatal repairs with the recurrence of their oro-nasal fistula in the post-alveolar area. Decellularized dermal graft was placed between the nasal mucosa and the levator veli palatine muscle. patients were followed postoperatively and assessed for infection, dehiscence, signs of rejection, and fistula recurrence. All patients were followed for an average of three months. Clinical examination revealed no recurrence of their oro-nasal fistula nor associated symptoms of nasal reflux. Decellularized dermal grafts were not rejected nor extruded from the site of surgical repair. Decellularized dermal graft should be considered for use in the treatment of recurrent oro-nasal fistula after cleft palate repair. We would also like to encourage further clinical study.
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ranking = 6811.7783857945
keywords = fistula
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28/32. Bisphosphonates: case report of nonsurgical periodontal therapy and osteochemonecrosis.

    The risk of developing osteochemonecrosis is increased in patients who are taking bisphosphonate drugs and must undergo extractions or other dental surgery. Because of the difficulty in predicting and preventing osteochemonecrosis and in managing patients after it has occurred, avoidance of surgery has been advised. This paper reports on the development of this complication in a patient who received nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Although it is believed that the risk of developing this severely debilitating complication is low when treating patients nonsurgically, practitioners must be able to recognize and understand the presentation and difficulties in managing osteochemonecrosis, even when only nonsurgical therapy is performed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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29/32. Two unusual cases of dental (periapical) infection.

    Cutaneous sinus tracts of dental origin are often a diagnostic challenge. A delay in correct diagnosis can result in inappropriate treatments. We describe two unusual cases of periapical infection. The first patient presented with a fistulized tumoral mass under the chin present for 1 year. The patient had only one tooth, and that was anatomically unrelated to the tumor. Radiological examination showed a dormant tooth that was infected periapically. The second case was a man who complained of asymmetry and change in his left nasolabial fold of 4-5 week's duration. On examination, the nasolabial folds were asymmetric without any sign of facial palsy. On intraoral examination, there was a severely decayed tooth on the same side. Radiological survey confirmed periapical infection. A few weeks after proper treatment, the nasolabial folds became symmetric.
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ranking = 5
keywords = dental
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30/32. Congenital labial fistulas: case report.

    This report is about a seven-year-old male, who came to the dental clinic for routine treatment and congenital labial fistulas was found. The clinical case is described as well as the most outstanding points of this clinical entity.
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ranking = 3406.8891928973
keywords = fistula, dental
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