Cases reported "Oral Fistula"

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1/7. Clinical significance of the structural integrity of the superior aspect of the mandibular canal.

    BACKGROUND: Sparse data can be found regarding the structural integrity of the superior aspect of the mandibular canal. In many cases, the mandibular canal must be carefully evaluated prior to defining patient treatment. methods: In this case report, a 54-year-old patient presented with a periapical infection involving the mesial root of the mandibular right second molar (#31). Radiographic evaluation revealed that the periapical lesion extended from the apex of the tooth to the superior aspect of the mandibular canal. Upon surgical removal of the tooth, an apical communication between the extraction socket and mandibular nerve was located. A guided bone regeneration procedure was performed to protect the nerve from subsequent damage and to prepare the site for future implant placement. Implants were placed in the area approximately 5 months following the regenerative procedure. RESULTS: After implant placement, the patient experienced normal function and no mandibular symptomatology. Implants have been in function for the past 4 years. CONCLUSIONS: Many factors, both pathologic and developmental, can lead to a discontinuity of the superior aspect of the mandibular canal. Normally, a thin cortical plate of bone protects the nerve. When a lack of structural integrity of the canal roof is discovered, enucleation of a periapical infection or subsequent implant placement can lead to potential disruption of the nerve. Limited information is available regarding the integrity of this protective cover. This case report underscores the importance of proper clinical diagnosis before implant placement in the posterior mandible.
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2/7. Extraoral inverted teeth eruption: a case report.

    A 14-year-old female presented with extraoral inverted eruption of left mandibular permanent molars 18 and 19 at the lower left inferior border of the mandible. Both the teeth started erupting 1 year after an extraoral surgical intervention for a discharging sinus 6 years ago. The subsequent eruption to the extraoral position of the permanent molars at the inferior border of mandible may be the result of the previous surgical procedure or pathology related to the abnormally positioned teeth. This case presents an infrequent complication affecting the adjacent permanent teeth.
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keywords = eruption
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3/7. Chronic suppurative osteomyelitis of the mandible: case report.

    BACKGROUND: osteomyelitis of the maxillofacial skeleton is rare in developed countries such as australia. This case report describes the successful surgical treatment of chronic suppurative osteomyelitis (CSO) of the mandible in a 75 year old man. The precipitant factor was thought to be a retained tooth root in the (right) posterior body of the mandible. methods: Treatment included a pre-surgical course of antibiotics (clindamycin 300mg, p.o. q.i.d. for two weeks) followed by removal of the retained root, surgical debridement of the affected bone, the intra-oral draining sinus, and resection of the cutaneous sinus tract. Specimens were taken for bacterial cultures and antibiotic sensitivity testing, and the resected tissue sent for histopathological review. RESULTS: On clinical and radiographic review at three months, the patient was well, completely symptom free and the osteomyelitis had fully resolved. CONCLUSION: This case report demonstrates the typical features of CSO. The combination of antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement was effective in the treatment of chronic suppurative osteomyelitis of the mandible utilizing intravenous sedation, and so averting the need for a general anaesthetic.
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4/7. Congenital lower lip pits (Van der Woude syndrome): report of a case.

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by a cleft lip and palate with congenital lip pits. This is a report of a case of VWS with sinuses in the lower lip, a cleft in the upper lip, and a supernumerary tooth in the maxilla. The main characteristics of this disorder are discussed. Dental treatment of the patient was performed, but the surgical removal of the sinus was rejected by the parents. This case report brings this condition to the attention of dentists and surgeons and emphasizes lip pits may not always be identical in appearance.
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5/7. Loss of permanent mandibular lateral incisor and canine tooth buds through extraoral sinus: report of a case.

    Extraoral sinus tract may occur as a result of an inflammatory process associated with the necrotic pulp. Several non odontogenic disorders may also produce an extraoral sinus tract, the differential diagnosis of these clinical findings is of prime importance in providing appropriate clinical care. Presented here is a case report of 4 year old female child with extraoral sinus tract through which the tooth buds of mandibular permanent left lateral incisor and mandibular permanent left canine were lost. The extraoral sinus was due to mandibular left primary canine with class IX fracture (Ellis and Davey's classification).
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6/7. Two unusual cases of dental (periapical) infection.

    Cutaneous sinus tracts of dental origin are often a diagnostic challenge. A delay in correct diagnosis can result in inappropriate treatments. We describe two unusual cases of periapical infection. The first patient presented with a fistulized tumoral mass under the chin present for 1 year. The patient had only one tooth, and that was anatomically unrelated to the tumor. Radiological examination showed a dormant tooth that was infected periapically. The second case was a man who complained of asymmetry and change in his left nasolabial fold of 4-5 week's duration. On examination, the nasolabial folds were asymmetric without any sign of facial palsy. On intraoral examination, there was a severely decayed tooth on the same side. Radiological survey confirmed periapical infection. A few weeks after proper treatment, the nasolabial folds became symmetric.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = tooth
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7/7. Consequences of serious oral injury associated with the congenital analgia syndrome.

    Three sisters at the ages of seven months, twelve years, and thirteen years presented with the initial damages to the oral tissues and the distinctive long-term effects in conjunction with the congenital analgia syndrome. The severity of this syndrome justifies the consideration of a prophylactic extraction of the primary dentition. A controlled mastication will be more likely with increasing age and eruption of the permanent teeth.
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keywords = eruption
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