Cases reported "Oral Hemorrhage"

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11/19. Upper airway obstruction secondary to warfarin-induced sublingual hematoma.

    Sublingual hematoma is a rare but potentially fatal complication of oral warfarin sodium. Less than ten cases are reported in the English-language literature with only two of these appearing in the otolaryngologic literature. Spontaneous bleeding into the sublingual and submaxillary spaces creates a "pseudo-Ludwig's" phenomenon with elevation of the tongue and floor of mouth and subsequent airway compromise. Two new cases, along with a review of the literature are presented. Management is directed at prompt control of the airway and reversal of the coagulopathy. Sore throat is a uniform, early complaint that should be taken seriously in any patient receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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12/19. Upper airway obstruction as a complication of oral anticoagulation therapy. Report of three cases.

    While taking orally administered anticoagulants, three patients had hemorrhages into their retropharyngeal and submandibular spaces, suffering eventual acute airway obstruction. One of the patients died. Despite the life-threatening nature of this complication of anticoagulant therapy, the diagnosis was obscure and initially veiled in complaints of sore throat or hoarseness, suggesting infection. Thorough investigation of such complaints is necessary in patients receiving anticoagulation therapy. If a hematoma is discovered, the patient should be admitted to the hospital for close observation and prompt reversal of anticoagulation with plasma. intubation or tracheostomy also may be required.
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ranking = 1.2153904585669
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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13/19. Upper-airway obstruction as a complication of oral anticoagulation therapy.

    We treated a patient for warfarin-induced sublingual hematoma causing upper-airway obstruction. This complication of oral anticoagulation therapy is rare; only three other cases have been reported in the English literature. All reported patients developed acute respiratory embarrassment necessitating emergency airway establishment. Sublingual hematomas usually resolve spontaneously, and surgical drainage is rarely necessary.
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ranking = 1.2292342751401
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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14/19. Acute dissecting hematoma: a complication of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    The ADH is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening bleeding complication after oral maxillofacial surgery. Prevention via adequate preoperative laboratory evaluation and meticulous mechanical hemostasis during surgery is important. In spite of these measures, cases will infrequently occur, necessitating rapid accurate diagnosis and effective therapy. Close monitoring and continual airway assessment and control are paramount. Local measures are usually effective in hemorrhage control and the use of prophylactic antibiotics is suggested.
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ranking = 0.01384381657324
keywords = airway
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15/19. Asphyxial death caused by postextraction hematoma.

    A 71-year-old man was admitted to an emergency room because of postextraction hemorrhage and died of asphyxia caused by airway obstruction. About 40 days earlier, he had had 11 carious teeth removed without postextraction bleeding. At autopsy, liver cirrhosis was found, but examination of his previous extractions and postmortem external findings did not show a general hemorrhagic tendency. The surgical incision in the gingiva had been sutured, and no damage to the bony socket or large vasculature was found. We could not determine the etiologic source of the decedent's rapidly increasing hematoma. Postextraction hemorrhage or hematoma is a common complication in routine dental extraction, but marked hematoma formation around the airway may cause critical respiratory problems in the short run. In such cases, the maintenance of the airway, including control of hemorrhage, is necessary at an early stage.
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ranking = 0.27076572485986
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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16/19. Traumatic macroglossia.

    A case of severe macroglossia resulting from trauma (tongue biting) during eclampsia and causing respiratory obstruction is described. Despite medical treatment with steroids and antibiotics for a week, followed by tracheostomy, no significant improvement was observed. After an energetic but cautious maneuver of reducing and restraining the tongue in the oral cavity, the swelling reduced dramatically in 24 to 48 hours. Earlier manual replacement of the tongue into the oral cavity is advised in order to arrest the cycle of venous and lymphatic obstruction and congestion that leads to further edema and increased tongue swelling. The mechanism of traumatic macroglossia is discussed.
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ranking = 0.0088887350095001
keywords = obstruction
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17/19. Angina bullosa hemorrhagica.

    Angina bullosa hemorrhagica is characterized by acute blood blisters, mainly on the soft palate. Elderly patients are usually affected and lesions heal spontaneously without scarring. The pathogenesis is unknown, although it may be a multifactorial phenomenon. Trauma seems to be the major provoking factor and long term use of steroid inhalers has also been implicated in the disease. No underlying hematologic or immunopathogenic disorder has been found. Treatment is symptomatic. We present a 67-year-old patient with recurrent oral blood blisters which were diagnosed as angina bullosa hemorrhagica. Trauma by dental injections and use of steroid inhalers were identified as etiologic factors in this case. Erosions healed with a week. Although this is a benign condition, it may result in acute airway obstruction. Recognition is, therefore, of great importance for dermatologists.
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ranking = 0.24307809171338
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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18/19. hemorrhage in the floor of the mouth during implant placement in the edentulous mandible: a case report.

    This report describes a life-threatening hemorrhage in the floor of a patient's mouth during routine implant placement in the anterior mandible. airway obstruction caused by hematoma development resulted in acute nasotracheal intubation and subsequent surgical intervention. Surgical, radiographic, and anatomic considerations to prevent severe bleeding are discussed. An extraoral submental approach in cases with large sublingual hematomas is recommended. An outpatient should be treated in or close to a hospital where these complications can be dealt with promptly and effectively.
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ranking = 0.00444436750475
keywords = obstruction
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19/19. The anaesthetic management of a case of Kawasaki's disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) and Beckwith-Weidemann syndrome presenting with a bleeding tongue.

    An unusual case of a 13-month-old child with Kawasaki's disease and the Beckwith-Weidemann syndrome is presented. The child, while anticoagulated with warfarin and aspirin to prevent extension of a coronary artery thrombus, fell and lacerated the tongue resulting in haemorrhage and significant swelling. The ongoing haemorrhage, combined with difficulty in securing venous access resulted in the child becoming shocked. Surgical intervention was required to stem the haemorrhage. The anaesthetic management of a shocked child with a coronary artery aneurysm and thrombosis, a potentially difficult airway and a full stomach is described.
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ranking = 0.01384381657324
keywords = airway
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