Cases reported "Oral Hemorrhage"

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1/13. tongue piercing resulting in hypotensive collapse.

    tongue piercing remains popular. A variety of complications have been reported, including life-threatening infection, airway problems and damaged teeth or mucosal surfaces. A patient who collapsed after continuous profuse bleeding following tongue piercing is presented. It is recommended that piercing practitioners be licensed and inspected. A list of written post piercing instructions for customers is included on how to deal with, or who to contact regarding potential complications including haemorrhage.
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2/13. Massive bleeding from an ectopic lingual thyroid follicular adenoma during pregnancy.

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly. It can be found anywhere between the foramen cecum and the normal position of the thyroid gland. Massive bleeding from an ectopic lingual thyroid is unusual and occasionally fatal. We present a case of a 22-year-old woman who had a large mass at the base of the tongue for over 6 years. In the sixth month of pregnancy, the patient experienced massive bleeding from the tongue base mass. A thyroid scan revealed that this mass was the only functioning thyroid tissue. Because of massive bleeding and her shock status, the patient received an emergent embolization of the bilateral lingual arteries. Then the huge lingual thyroid was subsequently excised via a mandible swing approach to prevent further episodes of bleeding. Pathology analysis indicated ectopic thyroid tissue with follicular adenoma. She delivered without complications in the 36th week and had a normal baby. This case was a very rare one in our review. Although ectopic lingual thyroid usually is not managed surgically, excision of ectopic lingual thyroid can be life-saving when it is causing bleeding or airway obstruction.
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3/13. tongue piercing and its adverse effects.

    Piercing has become so popular during the last 20 to 30 years that many physicians are now treating patients with piercings and dealing with its side effects. We present 3 cases that illustrate the complications of tongue piercing (ie, infection, bleeding, and embedded ornaments). We describe the methods for inserting the ornaments to illustrate the possible adverse effects. Treatment recommendations and their application to those 3 patients are described.
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4/13. Prolonged bleeding following tongue piercing: a case report and review of complications.

    The number of adolescents and young adults undergoing intraoral piercing is increasing in the united states. Numerous articles have documented complications following intraoral piercing. This article presents a case of prolonged bleeding and reviews other documented sequelae following intraoral piercing. The article may serve as a guide to dental professionals whose patients seek advice regarding these procedures.
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5/13. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma of the tongue.

    Alveolar soft-part sarcoma is a rare, aggressive malignancy of uncertain histologic origin with a propensity for vascular invasion and distant metastasis. This neoplasm may mimic benign vascular neoplasms or malformations but careful evaluation of the unique imaging features on CT scans, MR images, and angiograms lead to the correct diagnosis. We present a case of alveolar soft-part sarcoma of the tongue and emphasize its radiologic and clinical features.
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6/13. vascular malformations of the tongue: MRI findings on three cases.

    vascular malformations are common lesions accounting for approximately 7% of all benign tumours, the majority of which develop in the head and neck region. Generally, vascular malformations such as lymphangiomas, haemangiomas, and arteriovenous communications in the head and the neck represent only an aesthetic problem. However, when localized in the tongue, these lesions can create clinical problems consisting, in the majority of cases, in spontaneous haemorrhage from the mouth. Although uncommon, progressive asymmetric growth of the tongue (macroglossia) can be also observed. Three consecutive cases of vascular malformations of the tongue have been studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Neither contrast medium administration nor angio-MR technique was used. In our experience, MR appears to be the ideal technique to define the site, extension and origin of vascular malformations, due to its ability to depict the typical signal flow voids in the lesions and to differentiate slow-flow lesions from high-flow ones.
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7/13. tissue plasminogen activator-associated lingual artery hemorrhage.

    Reported is the case of a patient with vertebrobasilar artery ischemia who received tissue plasminogen activator with resulting hemorrhage into the tongue and nearly exsanguinating hemorrhage from a branch of the lingual artery. Suggestions for immediate management of the hemorrhage as well as prevention are presented. As the use of thrombolytic agents increases and the list of their indications expands, unusual life-threatening hemorrhagic problems other than gastrointestinal or intracranial bleeding will be seen, and management decisions may be life saving.
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8/13. Upper airway obstruction secondary to warfarin-induced sublingual hematoma.

    Sublingual hematoma is a rare but potentially fatal complication of oral warfarin sodium. Less than ten cases are reported in the English-language literature with only two of these appearing in the otolaryngologic literature. Spontaneous bleeding into the sublingual and submaxillary spaces creates a "pseudo-Ludwig's" phenomenon with elevation of the tongue and floor of mouth and subsequent airway compromise. Two new cases, along with a review of the literature are presented. Management is directed at prompt control of the airway and reversal of the coagulopathy. Sore throat is a uniform, early complaint that should be taken seriously in any patient receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.
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9/13. Utilization of therapeutic embolization in haemorrhage caused by carcinoma of the tongue.

    Selective transcatheter arterial embolization, using Gelfoam, was performed in 2 patients with bleeding from tongue arteries due to carcinoma. Though the patients were in poor general condition, being in the terminal stage of cancer, there were no complications and the bleeding was successfully controlled. This method was effective in controlling haemorrhage from the tongue due to carcinoma of the tongue.
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10/13. An unusual, deep lingual hemorrhage as a consequence of ligature strangulation.

    During the course of the daily practice of forensic pathology, little or no attention is generally devoted to the tongue (if it is even removed at all during the autopsy examination) except in a handful of relatively well-defined situations. In some other instances, such as injuries involving the neck and laryngopharyngeal organs, the tongue may be removed, but examined in only a cursory manner, since the serious pathology which caused or contributed to death is most often located in adjacent structures. While the postmortem examination was being carried out on a victim of ligature strangulation who exhibited relatively sparse external and laryngeal findings of significance, a unique and apparently heretofore undescribed patterned hemorrhage was discovered within the deep musculature of the tongue, having an appearance and contour identical to that of the curved edge of the subjacent hyoid bone. In difficult cases where strangulation is suspected as well as other potentially medicolegal problems with trauma involving the neck organs, a detailed inspection of the tongue through an easily accomplished dissection technique may provide invaluable information as to the mechanism of injury.
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