Cases reported "Oral Hemorrhage"

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11/13. Refinements of the tongue flap for closure of difficult palatal fistulas.

    The posteriorly based tongue flap can be very useful to close difficult palatal fistulas, especially because the palatal sling prevents dehiscence of the tongue flap. However, special techniques may need to be employed with very large palatal fistulas or severely scarred palates. This technique has been used successfully in 5 patients. A detailed case report is presented, for which refinements of the tongue flap technique was required.
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keywords = tongue
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12/13. Traumatic macroglossia.

    A case of severe macroglossia resulting from trauma (tongue biting) during eclampsia and causing respiratory obstruction is described. Despite medical treatment with steroids and antibiotics for a week, followed by tracheostomy, no significant improvement was observed. After an energetic but cautious maneuver of reducing and restraining the tongue in the oral cavity, the swelling reduced dramatically in 24 to 48 hours. Earlier manual replacement of the tongue into the oral cavity is advised in order to arrest the cycle of venous and lymphatic obstruction and congestion that leads to further edema and increased tongue swelling. The mechanism of traumatic macroglossia is discussed.
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ranking = 0.57142857142857
keywords = tongue
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13/13. The anaesthetic management of a case of Kawasaki's disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) and Beckwith-Weidemann syndrome presenting with a bleeding tongue.

    An unusual case of a 13-month-old child with Kawasaki's disease and the Beckwith-Weidemann syndrome is presented. The child, while anticoagulated with warfarin and aspirin to prevent extension of a coronary artery thrombus, fell and lacerated the tongue resulting in haemorrhage and significant swelling. The ongoing haemorrhage, combined with difficulty in securing venous access resulted in the child becoming shocked. Surgical intervention was required to stem the haemorrhage. The anaesthetic management of a shocked child with a coronary artery aneurysm and thrombosis, a potentially difficult airway and a full stomach is described.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = tongue
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