Cases reported "Oral Ulcer"

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1/15. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency in a child with severe oral involvement.

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency is a rare inherited defect of phagocytic function resulting from a lack of leukocyte cell surface expression of beta2 integrin molecules (CD11 and CD18) that are essential for leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and chemotaxis. A small number of patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 have a milder defect, with residual expression of CD18. These patients tend to survive beyond infancy; they manifest progressive severe periodontitis, alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket formation, and partial or total premature loss of the primary and permanent dentitions. We report on a 13-year-old boy with moderate leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 and severe prepubertal periodontitis. This case illustrates the need for the dentist to work closely with the pediatrician in the prevention of premature tooth loss and control of oral infection in these patients.
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2/15. Linear IgA disease histopathologically and clinically masquerading as lichen planus.

    In each of 2 cases reported, the patient presented with features of erosive lichen planus or lichenoid drug eruptions and an incisional biopsy taken from the patient was diagnosed histologically as lichen planus. Subsequent recurrences or exacerbations were associated with vesiculobullous lesions. Simultaneous or subsequent direct immunofluorescence studies--from the same tissue sample in one case and from a similar site in the other case--demonstrated classic features of linear IgA disease. Both patients were originally treated for lichen planus with systemic and/or topical corticosteroids with limited success. One patient was treated with sulfapyridine with minimal improvement. Both patients were subsequently treated with dapsone and demonstrated significant clinical improvement. We propose that linear IgA disease may be more common than reported in the oral cavity, inasmuch as many cases of recalcitrant lichen planus, erosive lichen planus, and lichenoid drug eruptions, especially those with a vesiculobullous component, may in reality represent linear IgA disease. We recommend that direct immunofluorescence be done in any case in which bullous lichen planus is suspected.
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ranking = 3.3789391294178
keywords = eruption
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3/15. Neonatal sublingual traumatic ulceration (Riga-Fede disease): a case report.

    Early eruption of primary teeth rarely occurs and is referred to as "natal or neonatal teeth". These teeth may cause some complications, including ulceration of the sublingual area, pain during suckling and future nutritional problems. A two-month-old infant suffering from sublingual area ulceration due to two neonatal teeth was examined. His teeth were extracted and healing of the ulcerated area was observed within the first week.
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ranking = 1.6894695647089
keywords = eruption
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4/15. Critical review of lymphomatoid papulosis of the oral cavity with case report.

    A 60-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Dental medicine at Long Island Jewish Medical Center for evaluation of multiple lesions of the tongue. She reported a long history of recurrent papular cutaneous eruptions that waxed and waned. A biopsy specimen of one of the cutaneous lesions was diagnosed as lymphomatoid papulosis. Sporadic, recurrent oral ulcers that resolved spontaneously were noted 10 to 14 days before the initial visit. These ulcers had recurred for the past 17 years. The most recent oral lesion was an erythematous, irregular, solitary ulcerated area on the middle third dorsum of tongue. The area quickly enlarged, ultimately developing extensive surface necrosis. Shortly after, a similar lesion on the posterior dorsum of the tongue developed. biopsy specimens of the former lesion showed numerous, large, atypical, pleomorphic, and hyperchromatic cells with abundant mitoses. The large, atypical cells were immunohistochemically proven to be T lymphocytes. A diagnosis of lymphomatoid papulosis was made. Two weeks later, the tongue lesions had spontaneously and totally resolved. The clinical, histomorphologic, and immunohistochemical features, as well as gene rearrangement studies of this rare entity, are presented.
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ranking = 1.6894695647089
keywords = eruption
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5/15. Oral mucosal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma--a dangerous mimic.

    Reports of T-cell lymphomas in the oral cavity are rare. Most have presented as a persisting ulcerated swelling. This paper reports two men, one of whom presented with a short history of increasing facial swelling and pain apparently related to a lower premolar tooth, and the other who had recurrent oral ulceration in several sites over a period of years. These types of cases are likely to present initially to general dental practitioners.
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6/15. Signs of medullar aplasia in the oral cavity: report of case.

    Medullar aplasia is a hematological disease characterized by medullar dysfunction that results in a marked decrease of various hematological cellular elements. This produces anemia, infections of different etiologies and also, spontaneous or provoked hemorrhagic syndromes of varying importance. A case of medullar aplasia affecting a child, diagnosed after a tooth extraction is reported, and accompanied by its pathological characteristics. In addition, an easy reading E.L.I.S.A/ test for diagnosing herpes virus type 1 or 2 is presented.
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7/15. erythema multiforme secondary to herpes simplex infection: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: erythema multiforme (EM) is a complex disease that may have cutaneous and/or mucosal involvement. The severity may range from mild to severe and potentially life threatening. The literature cites many factors including viruses, infections, and medications as causes. This report documents a patient who developed EM secondary to a herpes simplex viral (HSV) infection. methods: Two weeks following an eruption of herpes labialis, a 20-year-old white female patient developed acutely painful oral and labial ulcers accompanied by target skin lesions. A diagnosis of erythema multiforme (EM) was made. The patient was treated with antivirals, analgesics, and symptomatic therapy. RESULTS: Nine days after the onset of symptoms, the oral and cutaneous lesions had started to heal and the patient no longer required pain medication. CONCLUSIONS: Although the etiology of EM is still often unknown, infections with herpes simplex virus have been implicated as a possible precipitating factor. This case illustrates the association of the occurrence of EM with an HSV infection.
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ranking = 1.6894695647089
keywords = eruption
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8/15. Non-pigmenting cutaneous-mucosal fixed drug eruption due to piroxicam.

    BACKGROUND: piroxicam is a widely used anti-inflammatory drug. Most adverse reactions affect gastrointestinal system, liver and skin. Fixed drug eruption although very unusual, has also been described, but with cutaneous involvement exclusively.We present the case of a 49-year-old man who suffered three episodes of fixed drug eruption with cutaneous-mucosal involvement, even simulating an autoimmune disease, whenever he was treated with oral piroxicam. methods AND RESULTS: He was patch tested on normal skin with the GEIDC standard series and an NSAIDs series. He was patch tested on normal skin and on fixed eruption with piroxicam, meloxicam and tenoxicam (all of them 1 % pet). Oral challenge test was not performed due to the severity and reproducibility in previous reactions.Results showed a positive patch test to piroxicam (1 % pet) on fixed eruption, with negative results to the rest. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse drug reactions may present a wide variability of clinical symptoms. In these situations an accurate clinical history is necessary. To our knowledge this is the 1st report of non-pigmenting fixed drug eruption with cutaneous-mucosal involvement due to piroxicam. Cross-reactivity between oxicams could not be demonstrated by patch test on fixed eruption.
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ranking = 16.894695647089
keywords = eruption
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9/15. Sweet's syndrome: recurrent oral ulceration, pyrexia, thrombophlebitis, and cutaneous lesions.

    We report a case of Sweet's syndrome with recurrent oral ulceration, pyrexia, skin lesions, and migratory thrombophlebitis, with no detectable systemic cause, during a 2-year follow-up. biopsy examination both of oral lesions and the skin eruption showed a characteristic dense, perivascular, neutrophilic infiltrate in the lamina propria. Laboratory investigations confirmed an inflammatory syndrome with an increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, but no underlying cause was found. Sweet's syndrome is a rare immunologically mediated condition that belongs to the group of neutrophilic dermatoses that must be differentiated particularly from Behcet's disease. It is characterized by red-brown plaques and nodules that are frequently painful and occur primarily on the head, neck, and upper extremities. Often the patients also have neutrophilia and fever and may have oral ulceration. In approximately 10% of patients with Sweet's syndrome, there is an associated malignancy--most commonly acute myelogenous leukemia--but some cases, as here, are unassociated with detectable malignant or other disease, although the syndrome may precede the onset of definable systemic disease.
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keywords = eruption
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10/15. oral manifestations of cyclic neutropenia in a Japanese child: case report with a 5-year follow-up.

    Cyclic neutropenia is an uncommon hematologic disorder characterized by a marked decrease in the number of neutrophils in the peripheral blood occurring at regular intervals. The neutropenic phase is characteristically associated with clinical symptoms such as recurrent fever, malaise, headaches, anorexia, pharyngitis, ulcers of the oral mucous membrane, and gingival inflammation. This case report describes a Japanese girl who has this disease and suffers from periodontitis and oral ulceration. Her case has been followed up for the past 5 years from age 7 to 12. The importance of regular oral hygiene, careful removal of subgingival plaque and calculus, and periodic and thorough professional mechanical tooth cleaning was emphasized to arrest the progress of periodontal breakdown. Local antibiotic application with minocycline ointment in periodontal pockets was beneficial as an ancillary treatment, especially during neutropenic periods.
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