Cases reported "Orbital Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/17. Successful treatment of rhino-orbital mucormycosis without exenteration: the use of multiple treatment modalities.

    PURPOSE: To describe the successful management of rhino-orbital mucormycosis without the use of orbital exenteration. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: The patient had successful eradication of the fungal infection with retention of normal vision and ocular function. CONCLUSIONS: The use of multiple treatment modalities including aggressive surgical debridement guided by intraoperative frozen section monitoring, intravenous liposomal amphotericin b, intraorbital regular amphotericin b and hyperbaric oxygen may allow complete resolution of orbital phycomycosis and spare the patient from the blindness and disfigurement associated with exenteration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/17. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    We report a case of a 28-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed rhinocerebral zygomycosis during induction chemotherapy. This life-threatening fungal infection is an infrequent cause of neutropenic fever, and is occasionally found in patients with leukemia and lymphoma, or patients with severely compromised defence mechanisms due to other diseases. It is caused by moulds belonging to the Mucoraceae family, and is characterized by local destruction of the affected organ. In our patient, the infection spread from the paranasal sinuses to the right orbit, destroyed intraorbital structures and resulted in blindness within days. biopsy from the right maxillary sinus was performed and mucormycosis was suspected through microscopic examination. culture of the resected specimen identified rhizopus arrhizus as the causing agent. Treatment of zygomycosis should consist of radical surgical debridement of the infected tissue, together with intensive broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy with amphotericin b. What could be learned from this case is, that aggressive approaches to identify the cause of infection is necessary, and that aggressive treatment strategies are inevitable to overcome the infection. Furthermore, treatment of the underlying disease should be continued as soon as possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.150601307314
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/17. Case report. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis.

    A case of rhinocerebral zygomycosis treated with liposomal amphotericin b is described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.792167756095
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/17. Successful treatment of rhinocerebral zygomycosis using liposomal nystatin.

    We describe a case of successful treatment of rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a patient with multiple myeloma. Therapeutic strategies used included liposomal amphotericin, hyperbaric oxygen, GM-CSF and liposomal nystatin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.433734204876
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/17. Molecular identification of rhizomucor pusillus as a cause of sinus-orbital zygomycosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Sinus-orbital zygomycosis caused by rhizomucor pusillus in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia is described. Identification was achieved by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rRNA gene and by expression of zygospores in mating. This report highlights the value of ITS sequencing as a diagnostic tool for the identification of R. pusillus and expands the understanding of infection types caused by this zygomycete.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.792167756095
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/17. Successful treatment of rhinocerebral zygomycosis with a combination of caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin b.

    Genera of the order mucorales (rhizopus, Mucor, rhizomucor, absidia, Apophysomyces, cunninghamella, and Saksenaea) cause an angioinvasive infection called zygomycosis. mortality rates can approach 100% depending on the patient's underlying disease and form of zygomycosis. We report here on the unusual case of a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and zygomycosis unresponsive to monotherapy with liposomal amphotericin b, who responded favorably following the addition of the echinocandin caspofungin acetate.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.509034858533
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/17. Periorbital zygomycosis (mucormycosis) treated with posaconazole.

    PURPOSE: To report on the successful treatment of periorbital zygomycosis (mucormycosis) with posaconazole, a broad-spectrum oral antifungal available for compassionate use. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: review of a medical record. RESULTS: A 22-year-old male undergoing induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with periorbital cellulitis attributable to rhizopus. The patient was initially treated with liposomal amphotericin b, surgical debridement, and reversal of immune compromise. The patient was switched to posaconazole because of amphotericin side effects and lack of improvement. He took posaconazole for five months while undergoing additional cycles of chemotherapy. Despite recurrent profound neutropenia, the periorbital infection resolved, he tolerated reconstructive procedures, and he did not develop orbital invasion. His rhizopus isolate was highly susceptible to posaconazole in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Drug toxicities can limit the use of amphotericin in some patients with zygomycosis. Posaconazole shows promise as an alternative antifungal agent in the treatment of periorbital zygomycosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.509034858533
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/17. survival in cerebro-rhino-orbital zygomycosis and cavernous sinus thrombosis with combined therapy.

    An alcoholic man with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus had right conjunctivitis, facial numbness, and periorbital edema progressing to bilateral visual loss, and left ptosis in association with a large necrotic palatal ulcer due to zygomycosis. The infection progressed to bilateral retinal vein engorgement; left-sided ophthalmoplegia, fixed dilated pupil, and absent corneal reflex; and right-sided ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, and facial nerve paralysis. work-up revealed disease of both ethmoid sinuses and the right maxillary sinus, with bilateral thromboses of the cavernous sinuses. An aggressive combined therapeutic attack (three Caldwell-Luc procedures, exploration of orbit walls, control of diabetes, systemic and local amphotericin therapy) led to survival with a three-year follow-up thus far.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.792167756095
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/17. Rhino-orbital zygomycosis.

    A 63-year-old diabetic man presented with sinusitis with orbital and intracranial signs progressing over one week, due to zygomycosis. Despite control of the diabetes, surgical excision of infected tissue and antifungal therapy he died in the fifth week of illness. Pathological study showed extensive fungal infiltration of periorbital structures and mycotic thrombosis of many blood vessels with associated necrosis and infarction of fat and extraocular muscles.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.792167756095
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/17. Internal ophthalmoplegia resulting from acute orbital phycomycosis.

    Phycomycosis is an opportunistic infection occurring in immunocompromised hosts. It is the most acutely fatal fungal disease known. Therefore, early recognition and treatment are essential. Ocular and orbital involvement is part of a rhino-orbital-cerebral form of the disease. The orbital apex syndrome is the hallmark orbital involvement. A case of phycomycosis with internal ophthalmoplegia alone is reported. The internal ophthalmoplegia is probably secondary to involvement at the apex of the orbit, although not sufficiently diffuse to result in the complete orbital apex syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Orbital Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.