Cases reported "Orbital Neoplasms"

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1/199. Ancient schwannoma of the orbit.

    The ancient schwannoma is a rare variant of a neurilemoma with a course typical of a slow-growing benign neoplasm. Histologically, it can be confused with a malignant mesenchymal tumor because of increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and hyperchromatism. Despite the degree of nuclear atypia, mitotic figures are absent. We describe the clinical and histopathologic features of an ancient schwannoma of the orbit.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
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2/199. Surgical management of lesions affecting the anterior optic pathways.

    Although benign neoplasms are the most common lesions of the anterior visual pathways that lend themselves to a combined neurosurgical and ophthalmic surgical treatment, malignant neoplasms, infections (especially fungal), and vascular lesions are also sometimes treated via a combined approach. Recent advances in the field of skull base surgery have made it possible to treat complicated lesions in precarious locations with increasing margins of safety and decreasing morbidity. The role of the neurosurgeon in managing selected patients with lesions of the anterior a visual pathway should not be underestimated.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neoplasm
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3/199. Prenatal sonographic features of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    We describe a case of fetal rhabdomyosarcoma detected during the third trimester of pregnancy by prenatal sonography. At 33 weeks' gestation, sonography performed because of suspected polyhydramnios showed a solid mass of 120 x 54 mm arising from the anterior wall of the fetal thoracic cage. Another mass within the left maxillary area which originated from the left orbital floor was also detected. In the abdomen, there were multiple round masses in and around the liver. As the previous scan at 28 weeks had appeared normal, the multiple masses which became visible and enlarged rapidly in different locations led us to believe that there was fetal cancer. The most likely diagnosis was rhabdomyosarcoma (which was later confirmed), because it is the most prevalent soft-tissue tumor in children and may develop within or outside muscle anywhere in the body and at any age. Two other reported cases which were detected by prenatal ultrasound examination are also discussed.
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ranking = 0.032287347846502
keywords = cancer
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4/199. Immunohistochemical examination of an orbital alveolar soft part sarcoma.

    BACKGROUND: A 32 year-old male patient had a 6-week history of left-sided proptosis. Computer tomography revealed a 16x15x15 mm smooth and well-defined mass between the optic nerve and the medial and superior rectus muscles in the left orbit. methods: The tumour was excised via a cranio-medial orbitotomy approach. RESULTS: Histopathological examination, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy findings were consistent with an alveolar soft part sarcoma. Immunohistochemical staining showed positive immunoreactivity for neuronespecific enolase, vimentin, p53 (30%), p21 (10%) and cyclin d1 (20%), and negative immunoreactivity for CD45, cytokeratins, S-100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, synaptophysin, chromogranin, calcitonin, serotonin, thyreoglobulin, desmin, myosin, actin, HMB-45, pRB, p16 and BCL-2. The growth fraction of the tumour cells was 3%. At examination 4 years after surgical excision, there was no evidence of local recurrence or for metastases. CONCLUSION: Alveolar soft part sarcoma of the orbit is a rare malignant tumour best controlled by surgery. The unpredictable behaviour of these neoplasms, however, indicates the need for long-term follow-up.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
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5/199. Frontal intraosseous cryptic hemangioma presenting with supraorbital neuralgia.

    Primary intraosseous cranial hemangiomas are rare benign tumors comprising 0.2% of all osseous neoplasms. Symptomatic cranial cryptic hemangiomas are extremely rare. We report the case of a 43-year-old man with a cryptic hemangioma of the superior orbital rim. Radiological investigations revealed it to be an intraosseous cryptic mass which was totally excised and the supraorbital nerve was decompressed, relieving the patient of his symptoms. Histopathology showed features of an intraosseous hemangioma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
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6/199. hypnosis instead of general anaesthesia in paediatric radiotherapy: report of three cases.

    PURPOSE: This report proposes hypnosis as a valid alternative to general anaesthesia for immobilisation and set-up in certain cases in paediatric radiotherapy. methods: We report three cases of children who underwent radiotherapy in 1994 and were treated using hypnosis for set-up during irradiation. The first and the second were two cases of macroscopic resection of cerebellar medulloblastoma in which craniospinal irradiation was necessary, while the third patient suffered of an endorbitary relapse of retinoblastoma previously treated with bilateral enucleation, radiotherapy and chemotherapy; in this last situation the child needed radiation as palliative therapy. hypnosis was used during treatment to obtain the indispensable immobility. Hypnotic conditioning was obtained by our expert psychotherapist while the induction during every single treatment was made by the clinician, whose voice was presented to the children during the conditioning. RESULTS: Every single fraction of the radiation therapy was delivered in hypnosis and without the need for narcosis. CONCLUSIONS: hypnosis may be useful in particular situations to prepare paediatric cancer patients during irradiation, when lack of child collaboration might necessitate the use of general anaesthesia and when anaesthesia itself is not possible.
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ranking = 0.032287347846502
keywords = cancer
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7/199. Fine structure of a radiation-induced osteogenic sarcoma.

    An osteogenic sarcoma arose in the right orbit of a 7-year-old boy some 5 years after the right orbit had been treated by four courses of radiotherapy (total dose approximately 13,000 rads) for a multicentric retinoblastoma. death occurred 6 months after the orbital tumor was first detected. Study of the orbital tumor by electron microscopy revealed a cell population of varied morphology in which two main types were identified. In one group, the cells were large with radiolucent cytoplasm, which contained long branching segments of rough endoplasmic reticulum. In the second group, the cells were smaller with irregular nuclei and an electron-dense cytoplasm, which contained short segments of dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and numerous mitochondria. The first group of cells closely resembled osteoblasts, while the second group had some features of osteoclasts or their percursors. The branching processes of the tumor cells were separated by an amorphous ground substance, which contained collagen-like fibrils and hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition was in some instances in close relation to extracellular membrane-bound vesicles.
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ranking = 4.2861046224228
keywords = radiation-induced
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8/199. Gamma probe localization of cranial bone lesions.

    PURPOSE: Staging of cancer is essential to formulate appropriate treatment plans and to help predict prognosis. A solitary region of increased radionuclide uptake ("hot spot") on a bone scan may represent a metastasis or a masquerading lesion. biopsy may be required to determine its histologic nature, but localization of the site may be difficult because bone scans provide poor spatial resolution. methods: In two patients with breast carcinoma, radioactive technetium was administered intravenously and a gamma probe was used preoperatively and intraoperatively to identify the site of cranial bone involvement. RESULTS: The lesions were resected; one was a benign fibro-osseous lesion and one was a metastatic breast adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: A gamma probe may be helpful in localizing the site of radioactive uptake identified by bone scan.
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ranking = 0.032287347846502
keywords = cancer
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9/199. Orbital ganglioglioma arising from ectopic neural tissue.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of neonatal orbital ganglioglioma originating from ectopic neural tissue. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: An African-American male presented at birth with proptosis and expansion of the left orbit. A discrete soft-tissue mass was located inferolateral to the globe, which proved to be a ganglioglioma. CONCLUSION: The tumor is presumed to have originated from ectopic neural tissue in the orbit. Although infrequent, this tumor should be included in the differential diagnosis of neonatal orbital neoplasms.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
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10/199. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as tolosa-hunt syndrome.

    Choroidal involvement is a well-recognized manifestation of metastatic disease, particularly from breast and lung primaries. However, breast cancer can involve other ocular structures. The two patients presented illustrate diffuse orbital involvement of the extraocular muscles, simulating tolosa-hunt syndrome. This association has not been reported previously. Both patients responded well to local radiotherapy.
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ranking = 0.16143673923251
keywords = cancer
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