Cases reported "Orbital Neoplasms"

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11/199. Nonocular cancer in retinoblastoma survivors.

    From a review of the records of 2,302 patients with retinoblastoma collated from CPMC and AFIP, it was found that retinoblastoma patients who survived their original eye cancer have a high incidence of second nonocular malignancies. The second neoplasms occur almost exclusively (97.5%) in patients who have had bilateral retinoblastoma, although retinoblastoma is much more commonly unilateral. The second neoplasms have appeared between 1 and 42 years after the successful treatment of retinoblastoma and have been fatal in approximately 85% of cases. Seventy-one percent of patients develop tumors in the field of the radiation beam; many of these were following treatment with low doses of radiation and after short latent periods. Nineteen percent of patients develop tumors clearly out of the field of radiation (eg, osteogenic sarcoma of the femur). retinoblastoma patients appear to be unusually radio-sensitive to low doses of radiation and develop tumors in the field of radiation following treatment of 3,500 rads. They have a high incidence of nonocular tumors clearly distant from the radiation beam develop nonocular malignancies even if no radiation has been given. The incidence of multiple malignancies in patients successfully treated for retinoblastoma appears to be higher than for any other primary malignancy whether they receive radiation or not.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm, cancer
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12/199. Right temporal lobe glioblastoma presenting in the left orbit. Case report.

    Dissemination of gliomas outside the central nervous system without preceding neurosurgery is a rare phenomenon. Glial neoplasms presenting as bone lesions are even more rare. A case of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with initial presentation in the orbit following a single generalized seizure is described. Signs of intracranial hypertension resulted from subarachnoid tumor invasion. The patient was treated with whole-dose radiation therapy but survived for only 6 months following the initial presentation. An autopsy revealed a right temporal GBM with extensive subarachnoid spread and invasion in the left orbit and skull base. The literature on dissemination of primary tumors of the brain is reviewed.
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ranking = 0.46265522457765
keywords = neoplasm
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13/199. Solid facial edema preceding a diagnosis of retro-orbital B-cell lymphoma.

    Persistent solid facial edema is a rare condition of unknown cause. Although acute facial edema has been associated with numerous disease processes such as infections, neoplasms, immune disorders, inflammation, neuropathic processes, drugs, mechanical obstructions, and trauma, solid facial edema has most often been associated with acne vulgaris. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of solid facial edema preceding a diagnosis of a subcutaneous scalp and orbital/periorbital B-cell lymphoma.
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ranking = 0.46265522457765
keywords = neoplasm
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14/199. Orbital extension of a frontal sinus osteoma in a thirteen-year-old girl.

    Osteomas are uncommon, slow-growing, benign osteogenic neoplasms that arise most frequently in the craniofacial skeleton. (1,2) osteoma is the most common benign tumor of the nose and paranasal sinuses and the most common neoplasm of the frontal sinus. (3-5) Paranasal sinus osteomas originate in the sinus wall, fill the lumen with well-defined mature osseous tissue, and occasionally extend into the orbit where they give rise to orbital signs and symptoms. Osteomas most commonly become symptomatic in the second to fifth decade in life, but orbital involvement has rarely been reported in patients aged 18 years and younger. (2,6-10) We report a case of a frontal sinus osteoma with orbital extension in a 13-year-old girl.
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ranking = 0.9253104491553
keywords = neoplasm
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15/199. Solitary fibrous tumor of the orbit with a t(9;22)(q31;p13).

    solitary fibrous tumors are well-described neoplasms found predominantly in the subpleural region but also in many other body sites. They generally behave in a benign fashion, although a few cases that exhibit a malignant course have been reported. Genetic information on solitary fibrous tumors is sparse. This case illustrates a previously unreported finding of a tumor-specific t(9;22)(q31;p13) in a solitary fibrous tumor of the orbit of a 58-year-old man.
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ranking = 0.46265522457765
keywords = neoplasm
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16/199. Solitary fibrous tumour of the orbit. Report of a new case.

    PURPOSE: Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the orbit is a very rare lesion that may be misdiagnosed as fibrous histiocytoma, haemangiopericytoma, or other orbital tumour. We studied a case of SFT of the orbit in a 35-year-old woman. methods: The patient, with a 1-year history, reported a 'pressure' sensation behind her right eye, but no pain, vision changes, or other associated symptoms. Ocular examination was normal. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a well-circumscribed medial mass in the right orbit. The tumour was excised. RESULTS: The tumour was a cellular spindle-cell neoplasm with a storiform pattern. The tumour cells were spindle-shaped with bland nuclei and rare mitoses. Immunostaining was positive for vimentin and CD34, but negative for cytokeratin (AE1-AE3), EMA, desmin, smooth muscle actin, S-100, CD31, CD45 and bcl-2. CONCLUSION: SFT can infrequently involve the orbit. The tumour must be removed entirely to avoid recurrences. Careful and continued follow-up is important because orbital recurrence may occur several years after the excision of the primary tumour.
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ranking = 0.46265522457765
keywords = neoplasm
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17/199. Fractionated, three-dimensional, planning-assisted proton-radiation therapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: a novel technique.

    PURPOSE: Most children with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma will survive their disease. However, conventional photon-radiation treatment, as part of multimodality therapy, results in varying degrees of long-term functional and cosmetic side effects. This report introduces external beam proton radiation therapy (PRT) as a conformal, three-dimensional planned radiation technique for this disease, analyzes normal tissue dosimetry, and describes the technique's application in the first 2 patients. MATERIAL AND methods: Between January 1995 and February 1996, 2 patients underwent PRT following biopsy and chemotherapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. Fifty and 55 cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) were delivered to the gross tumor volume and 40 CGE to clinical target volumes in both patients. A relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 was utilized to correlate proton dose calculations with CGE. To achieve dose conformity, a "patch technique" was utilized, where target regions were divided into segments, each treated by a separate proton field. Dose-volume histograms were obtained for target and nontarget regions, including lens, bony orbit, pituitary gland, optic chiasm, optic nerves, lacrimal gland, and ipsilateral frontal and temporal lobes. RESULTS: At 3.4 and 2.5 years after PRT, both patients are clinically and radiographically free of disease. visual acuity remains excellent, without signs of cataract formation; pituitary function is normal; cosmetically, only mild enophthalmos is noticeable. Doses to 90%, 50%, and 5% of lens volume were kept at less than 1%, less than 2%, and less than 8%, respectively. Fifty percent of lacrimal gland volume received less than 36% of the prescribed dose and 50% of the volume of the optic chiasm, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus were restricted to less than 2%. Proton conformity to orbital contents resulted in between 9% and 36% of the prescribed dose reaching the ipsilateral temporal and frontal lobes immediately adjacent to bony orbit (5% volume). CONCLUSION: PRT can offer excellent sparing of lens and selected intraorbital and ocular normal structures, while maintaining conformal target-dose coverage. The steep dose gradient beyond the orbit minimizes irradiation of normal brain parenchyma, with almost complete sparing of the pituitary gland. Reduction of integral irradiation exposure of the periorbital region will, hopefully, reduce the risk of second malignancy later in life. Reduced radiation dose to specific organs in close proximity to, but not part of the target region promises improved functional outcome and better cosmesis for childhood cancer survivors.
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ranking = 0.01493791016894
keywords = cancer
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18/199. Temporoparietal fascial flap in orbital reconstruction.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the success of the temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF) in the primary or secondary reconstruction of difficult orbital defects and to review the surgical techniques. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: Tertiary medical center. patients: Nine patients with diverse orbital cavity or periorbital soft tissue and bony defects due to trauma, benign or malignant neoplasms, and radiation treatment. INTERVENTIONS: Temporoparietal fascial flap anatomy and techniques of harvest and inset are reviewed in detail. Four cases are presented to illustrate possible variables in orbital reconstruction. Variables examined include the location of defects, the success of flap survival in orbital cavities after primary or secondary reconstruction, the effects of prior irradiation on flap survival, and the possibility of concurrent osteointegrated implant placement with TPFF reconstruction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Functional and aesthetic outcomes were determined by physical examination and preoperative and postoperative photographs. RESULTS: All patients had successful transfer of TPFF grafts without flap compromise. Temporoparietal fascial flap was a viable option for subtle orbital and malar contour defects. In chronically inflamed wounds such as with osteoradionecrosis and orbitoantral fistula, TPFF successfully restored vascularity, obliterated the defects, and enabled the placement of osteointegrated implants. The TPFF also supported the concurrent placement of a free calvarial bone graft. Finally, split-thickness skin grafted onto a pedicled TPFF showed 100% survival. CONCLUSIONS: The TPFF is one of the most reliable and versatile regional flaps in the head and neck for orbital reconstruction. This study presents the use of TPFF in a variety of orbital defects, from lateral bony rim defects to total exenteration. Timing of repair in this study spans from immediate reconstruction to reconstruction delayed more than 50 years after the initial injury. In all cases, reconstruction with TPFF resulted in improved bony and soft tissue contours, and incurred minimal morbidity.
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ranking = 0.46265522457765
keywords = neoplasm
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19/199. Perineural spread leading to orbital invasion from skin cancer.

    Orbital and intracranial invasion from skin cancer is an uncommon but serious consequence of skin cancer located around the orbit, particularly the forehead. Perineural spread is an aggressive manifestation of skin cancer similar to lymph node metastases. Such spread can provide access to the orbit and squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histology reported. Treatment should be directed at preventing such orbital spread. Adjuvant radiotherapy is strongly recommended. disease may present in an advanced state within the orbit or beyond the orbital apex and involve the cavernous sinus. Palliative radiotherapy should be considered in such advanced cases. Presented are the cases of four patients treated for advanced orbital and intracranial spread from periorbital skin cancer.
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ranking = 0.11950328135152
keywords = cancer
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20/199. Superior oblique muscle palsy in a patient with orbital dermoid cyst.

    We describe the clinical and radiologic findings and surgical outcome of an orbital dermoid cyst causing a superior oblique muscle palsy in a child. Superior oblique muscle palsy in childhood is most often congenital. Less common causes are trauma, vascular lesions, neoplasms, and infections.(1,2) The most common orbital lesions in children are dermoid and epidermoid cysts.(3-5) A dermoid cyst at the region of trochlea is suspected as the cause of superior oblique muscle palsy in our case. This unusual presentation of a dermoid cyst has not been reported previously.
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ranking = 0.46265522457765
keywords = neoplasm
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