Cases reported "Ossification, Heterotopic"

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1/49. Heterotopic mesenteric ossification ('intraabdominal myositis ossificans'): report of five cases.

    Intraabdominal heterotopic ossification is a very uncommon disorder. We report five new cases, review the previous literature, and discuss the clinical and pathologic features of these lesions. The clinical features of the current cases and of those previously reported are remarkably similar. All patients were middle-aged to elderly men (range, 43-80 years; mean, 61 years) who had small bowel obstruction associated with heterotopic bone formation in the small bowel mesentery, often after one or more abdominal operations. In one case, an initial diagnosis of extraosseous osteosarcoma was considered. This unusual reactive process shares many of the clinical and pathologic features of myositis ossificans, as classically described in somatic soft tissues. We propose to designate this condition heterotopic mesenteric ossification.
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keywords = ossificans, myositis ossificans, myositis
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2/49. Melanotic schwannoma. An unusual case of an ossified soft tissue mass.

    A case of a melanotic schwannoma presenting as a soft tissue mass of the abductors of the hip is reported. The radiographic findings suggested myositis ossificans, but several subtle findings raised the concern for something else. A bilobed appearance, lack of classic zoning pattern of the ossification, and atypical pain pattern should alert the physician. biopsy should be considered if the radiographic and clinical presentations are not classic for myositis ossificans.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = ossificans, myositis ossificans, myositis
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3/49. Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and its aetiology in childhood: the contribution of computerised tomography in aetiological diagnosis and management.

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to identify factors correlated with the CT outcome and to examine the contribution of the CT scan in the aetiological diagnosis and management of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in childhood. methods: The records of 35 consecutively investigated patients by the audiology Department of Great Ormond Street Hospital between January 1996 and June 1998 were reviewed. The CT results, population sample characteristics, initiation of further investigations after the CT results and management decisions based on the CT results were tabulated and analysed. RESULTS: In a series of 35 consecutively investigated children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, 11 CT scans were identified as abnormal. The CT findings were: labyrinthitis ossificans (3), unilaterally dilated vestibular aqueduct (2), bilaterally dilated vestibular aqueduct (2), unilateral deformity of the cochlea ('Mondini') (1), unilateral severe labyrinthine dysplasia (1), unilateral markedly narrow internal acoustic meatus (1), bilaterally dilated lateral semicircular canals (1). The presence of progressive hearing loss was a significant predictor of abnormal CT outcome, while the severity of hearing loss was not. The CT scans offered valuable information regarding the aetiological diagnosis in all cases and, in addition, prompted the appropriate vestibular rehabilitation in three cases, further investigations in four (with dilated vestibular aqueduct) and hearing preservation counselling in two (bilateral DVA) (seven out of 35 = 20%). CONCLUSION: All children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss should have a CT scan of the petrous pyramids/IAMs performed at some stage, as not only aetiology but also prognosis and management of these cases may be significantly influenced by the CT outcome.
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ranking = 0.16206705690804
keywords = ossificans
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4/49. arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: a unique case report.

    A 62-year-old male presented with progressive quadriparesis. magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a spinal cord syrinx but failed to detect extensive arachnoiditis ossificans noted on insertion of a syringopleural shunt. A postoperative computed tomography scan clearly demonstrated the abnormality and its extent. We present a rare case of syringomyelia resulting from spinal arachnoiditis ossificans and review the relevant literature.
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ranking = 0.97240234144822
keywords = ossificans
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5/49. Radiologic diagnosis of labyrinthitis ossificans.

    labyrinthitis ossificans is the pathological ossification of the membranous labyrinthine spaces in response to processes which are destructive of the membranous labyrinth or the endosteum of the otic capsule. It has been primarily a histopathologic diagnosis. Complex motion tomography however, allows a detailed view of the osseous labyrinth and permits the diagnosis in the living state. Radiologic documentation of labyrinthitis ossificans is objective evidence of a process destructive of the membranous labyrinth. It supports the likelihood of an absence of cochlear and vestibular function. It alerts the surgeon to the possible obliteration of key inner ear anatomical landmarks.
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ranking = 0.97240234144822
keywords = ossificans
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6/49. Fractured heterotopic bone in myositis ossificans traumatica.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the case of a patient with an acute fracture occurring through preexisting, quiescent, posttraumatic heterotopic bone formation of the gastrocnemius muscle. The lesion demonstrated a previously unreported pattern of healing. This case serves to demonstrate an infrequent event with a rare and heretofore unreported sequella. Clinical Features: A 54-year-old man with preexisting, mature heterotopic bone within the left gastrocnemius muscle experienced reinjury to the site. The preexisting heterotopic bone was a result of a sporting injury that had occurred 32 years previously. At the time of the new injury, the patient experienced immediate, severe pain. Radiographs demonstrated a nondisplaced oblique fracture through the preexisting heterotopic bone. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated with protective wrapping and physiotherapy modalities. Because only the heterotopic bone was involved, the leg was not placed in a cast. Follow-up radiographs obtained 14 weeks later showed callus formation about the fractured site and evidence of union. CONCLUSION: Fractures occurring through mature heterotopic bone formations, such as those seen in myositis ossificans traumatica, are infrequent; callus formation with union of the fractured fragments is an even rarer occurrence.
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ranking = 1
keywords = ossificans, myositis ossificans, myositis
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7/49. Heterotopic ossification in unidentified skeletal remains.

    Heterotopic ossification is a benign, ectopic bone growth that develops in muscle and other soft tissue. The exact cause is poorly understood, but it is a rarely serious complication of soft tissue trauma. Its most common form, myositis ossifications traumatica, occurs as a secondary complication of direct muscle injury. However, other forms are less common and can result from specific pathologic conditions, such as spinal cord trauma and metabolic disorders. In patients who have had spinal cord injury and subsequent paraplegia, heterotopic ossification often results in ankylosis of the hip and a loss in range of motion. Ectopic ossification occurs below the injury site, and, although the specific muscle groups can vary, it usually involves those for which the origin and insertion involve the anterior pelvis and proximal femur. In dried bone, heterotopic ossification can appear as a smooth, irregularly shaped benign tumor of mature bone, extending from the surface but not invading the cortical bone. These tumors range in size from a few millimeters to several centimeters. Because heterotopic ossification is often associated with specific types of injuries, it has a unique anthropological use in forensic cases.
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ranking = 0.0001888244388857
keywords = myositis
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8/49. Occipitocervical pseudomalignant osseous tumor of the soft tissue (fasciitis ossificans). Case report.

    The authors describe the case of a 12-year-old girl in whom a pseudomalignant osseous tumor of the soft tissue was diagnosed. The lesion was resected, and at 3-year postresection follow-up examination, neuroradiological studies demonstrated no recurrence of the tumor.
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ranking = 0.64826822763215
keywords = ossificans
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9/49. Heterotopic ossification of peripheral nerve ("neuritis ossificans"): report of two cases.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Heterotopic ossification ("neuritis ossificans") is among the least frequently encountered reactive lesions in peripheral nerves. Only two cases have been described previously, one in the median nerve of a 34-year-old man, and the other in the ulnar nerve of an adult woman. The architecture of this lesion is distinctly zonal. Consisting of a central fibroblastic core, an intervening zone of osteoid production, and a peripheral layer of ossification, the pattern is remarkably similar to that of myositis ossificans. This similarity and the occurrence of the process in superficial nerves have led to speculation that trauma plays a role in its pathogenesis; this hypothesis remains unproved. We describe two additional cases of neuritis ossificans. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: One patient, a 41-year-old man, experienced pain and numbness in the left leg for several months but had no history of local trauma. A mass was detected in the saphenous nerve. The second patient, a 16-year-old boy, noted subacute onset of pain in the popliteal fossa and decreased sensation in the distribution of the lateral sural cutaneous nerve. A mass was found within the tibial nerve at the knee level. INTERVENTION: In each patient, resection of the mass required sacrifice of a segment of the nerve. CONCLUSION: In each patient, the mass was composed of fibrovascular tissue with osteoid and bone deposition arranged in a zonal pattern. The ossifying process was intraneural but encased rather than directly involving nerve fascicles. These exceptionally intact examples of neuritis ossificans underscore its resemblance to myositis ossificans. Nerve-sparing resection of such masses is not always possible.
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ranking = 1.5344693983563
keywords = ossificans, myositis ossificans, myositis
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10/49. arachnoiditis ossificans of the cauda equina. Case report and review of the literature.

    The authors describe a case of arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) of the cauda equina. The lesion is a rare pathological entity usually confined to the thoracic and high lumbar regions that can cause progressive spinal cord and cauda equina compression, inducing severe neurological deterioration. The authors analyze the clinical symptoms, radiological features, histological data, and treatment options relating to this case and 13 others described in the literature; additionally, they consider the possible mechanisms responsible for ossification of the leptomeninges. Although clustered arachnoidal cells are usually implicated in its pathogenesis, an environment induced by arachnoiditis and disturbed cerebrospinal fluid flow appears to be a more important factor. A therapeutic strategy is proposed for AO for which no effective treatment currently exists.
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ranking = 0.81033528454018
keywords = ossificans
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