Cases reported "Osteoarthritis"

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1/23. Acrometastasis in renal cell carcinoma.

    Acrometastasis is rare and may occur as the primary manifestation of an occult malignant tumor. Clinically, it may mimic benign osteoarthritic diseases, thus resulting in misdiagnosis and improper treatment. We describe a patient with renal cell carcinoma that presented itself as a case of chronic osteomyelitis after trauma to a finger. Such a lesion presents diagnostic challenges to both clinicians and histopathologists.
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ranking = 1
keywords = finger
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2/23. Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint: report of a case.

    A case of osteoarthritis in the TMJ which manifested clinical symptoms, radiographic changes, and the classic microscopic alterations has been presented. Whether the condition was a primary or secondary form of the disease could not be unequivocally ascertained, as the symptoms preceded the injection of a sclerosing solution and a mandibular fracture, both of which could be significant contributing factors to a trauma-induced secondary osteoarthritic change. Nevertherless, a lack of symptoms in other joints would tend to exclude a generalized (primary) form of osteoarthropathy. In this regard, symptoms referable to the TMJ (to the exclusion of other joints) are more consistent with findings of secondary osteoarthritic change. Whether osteoarthritic changes were discernible by radiography in the TMJ before the traumatic episodes recorded in the history is unknown. Indeed, a developmental anatomic anomaly could not be ruled out. Regardless of whether the changes were the result of primary degenerative disease or chronic trauma, the symptoms were adequately resolved by surgical intervention.
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ranking = 222.62636626418
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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3/23. rupture of flexor tendons after arthrodesis of the basal joint of the thumb.

    We report a case of rupture of the flexor tendons to the index finger after arthrodesis of the basal joint of the thumb. The tendons ruptured as a result of the Kirschner wires having penetrated in the carpal tunnel. This unusual complication was treated by tendon graft of the palmaris longus tendon.
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ranking = 1
keywords = finger
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4/23. The use of thoracolumbar and hip joint dysmorphism in identification.

    A case of roentgenographic identification of a deceased person is presented. Comparison of antemortem and postmortem radiographs of the vertebral column and hip joint, for the purpose of identification, was based on the deceased medical history, and the fact the deceased was endentulous, and fingerprint comparison was not feasible. Evaluation of anatomical variants, due to the effects of degenerative disease, provided positive identification in a visually unidentifiable deceased person.
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ranking = 1
keywords = finger
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5/23. rupture of the flexor tendon secondary to osteoarthritis of the pisotriquetral joint: case report.

    Attrition ruptures of the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel are uncommon. A case of rupture of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon to the little finger secondary to osteoarthritis of the pisotriquetral joint is reported. Mechanical attrition against the radial side of the pisiform was thought to be responsible for the rupture.
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ranking = 1
keywords = finger
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6/23. Extensor tendon rupture after osteoarthrosis of the wrist associated with nonrheumatoid positive ulnar variance.

    rupture of the extensor tendon after osteoarthrosis of the wrist associated with nonrheumatoid, positive ulnar variance is uncommon. Eight cases were seen in the last five years. They included five men and three women, whose ages ranged from 54 to 82 years (average, 70 years). In all the cases, roentgenograms revealed osteoarthrotic changes in the wrist and dorsal subluxation or dislocation of the ulnar heads. Seven cases had operations. friction with the dorsally subluxated or dislocated ulnar head and the osteophytes surrounding it caused these tendons to rupture. It was impossible to use end-to-end sutures, so tendon transfers or tendon grafts were performed. The patients were evaluated one to four years after surgery. Three patients complained of some disability in their daily lives, notably, limited flexion of their fingers. It is important that during surgery the reconstructed tendons should not be strained excessively.
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ranking = 1
keywords = finger
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7/23. Neuropathy, myopathy and destructive arthropathy in primary hypothyroidism.

    A 75-year-old woman with untreated primary hypothyroidism was found with peripheral neuropathy (including carpal tunnel syndrome), severe myopathy (high levels of creatine phosphokinase) and destructive arthropathy, affecting fingers, toes and the left knee. Radiographs of her knee showed destructive lesions of the tibial plateau similar to a pathologic compression fracture, while the joints of the fingers and toes showed all signs of severe erosive osteoarthritis (OA), radiographically documented over a period of 7 years. It is suggested that hypothyroidism is causally related to the development of erosive OA.
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ranking = 2
keywords = finger
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8/23. A biophysical study of posttraumatic ectopic ossification. A case report.

    Sites of ectopic ossification (EO) due to sports injury in a long-distance runner were biopsied and analyzed. The mineral content was compared to that of normal adult bone and to paraosteoarthropathy (poa) using biophysical methods. The degree of mineralization of bone tissue (DMBT) was employed as an evaluation of maturity of calcified tissue. Fluoride and carbonate content were determined. The crystal lattice dimensions expressed by the a and c parameters, crystal size, and/or lattice perfection were obtained with x-ray diffraction. All values were near those found in nonpathologic, newly deposited human compact bone. DMBT, crystal size, and/or lattice perfection were near those observed in a 24- to 30-month-old poa. The data suggest that posttraumatic EO represents otherwise normal young bone.
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ranking = 222.62636626418
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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9/23. The need for integrating TMJ therapy with implant prosthodontic cases.

    In this paper, guidelines for TMJ diagnosis and treatment were reviewed, and a case history was presented demonstrating the need for the integration of TMJ therapy. The case history presented is just one of many cases in the author's practice where the implant candidate also presented with a CM-TMJ disorder. The author emphasizes the incorporation of a CM-TMJ disorder screening exam and history to complement the initial consultation by all practitioners. This should include: 1) check for pops, clicks, in front of ears, (opening, closing, protruding); 2) range of motion (three fingers opening); 3) headaches; 4) grind or brux (night or day); 5) palpate key masticatory muscles of the head and neck; 6) tooth interferences; and 7) bite feels off. The author understands that not all practitioners have access to various diagnostic instrumentation, but emphasizes that this should not prevent the practitioner from diagnosing and treating CM-TMJ disorders or referring for such treatment. The literature has not indicated the overall benefits of implant prosthodontics other than allowing mastication of food and a feeling of self-esteem; but the benefits also allow the treatment and relief of CM-TMJ disorders via a stable occlusion.
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ranking = 1
keywords = finger
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10/23. Rapidly progressive destructive arthropathy of the shoulder--a viewpoint on pathogenesis.

    Two cases of rapidly progressive destructive shoulder arthropathy are described. Both patients were elderly women with generalized osteoarthropathy who had used forearm crutches for walking. Their shoulder disease was characterized by large, relatively painless effusions, low numbers of infiltrating leukocytes, biopsy evidence of mild inflammation, and radiological evidence of severe joint damage. Case 1 developed persistent drainage from a joint sinus, eventually necessitating arthrodesis. This complication has not previously been described in this condition. Hydroxyapatite crystals were demonstrated in the joint fluid in both cases but their pathological role is uncertain. We suggest that bearing weight through the upper limbs may hasten the development of degenerative arthritis in the shoulder, possibly by contributing to mechanical disruption of the rotator cuff.
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ranking = 222.62636626418
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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