Cases reported "Osteoblastoma"

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1/4. Acetabular osteoblastoma: description of a case.

    osteoblastoma is a slow-progressing, benign bone tumor, that is not frequently observed in clinical orthopaedics (approximately 1% of all primary bone tumors). There is predilection for the vertebrae (posterior arch), the femur, the tibia, and the cranium; it affects young subjects (from 10 to 35 years), with predilection for males (males: females = 2:1). Symptoms are not very specific, characterized essentially by moderate, discontinuous pain, that is responsive to treatment by NSAIDS; it may, at times, be asymptomatic. On radiographic assessment it is viewed as a lytic area that is rounded, greater than 2 cm in size, with unclear margins, with or without peripheral bone reaction. It is not easy to diagnose osteoblastoma, particularly if it is localized in unusual sites, such as in the pelvis. The authors present a case of osteoblastoma of the acetabular bottom in a subject aged 22 years, that was not diagnosed unrecognized for about 2 years from the onset of symptoms.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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2/4. osteoblastoma-like osteosarcoma of the distal tibia.

    We report a case of a 14-year-old boy with an intracompartmental lytic lesion with poorly defined margins in the right distal tibia that was originally treated with curettage and bone grafting. Histologic examination showed an osteoblastic tumor with unusual features, which was found on consultation to be an osteoblastoma-like osteosarcoma, a rare, low-grade variant of osteosarcoma. Subsequently, the patient underwent en bloc resection of the distal tibia, which was replaced with vascularized bone graft and followed by chemotherapy. Two years later, he is alive with lung metastases.
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ranking = 6
keywords = tibia
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3/4. osteoblastoma as a cause of osteomalacia assessed by bone scan.

    A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with a history of leg pain and mass. She had a benign osteoblastoma in right tibia. Resection of the tumor without treatment by vitamin d antagonist resulted in rapid cure of the osteomalacia. Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m MDP revealed multiple hot uptakes in initial scan, and follow up scan showed a clear resolution of the lesions.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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4/4. Epiphyseal osteoblastoma of tibia with xanthomatous stromal reaction.

    osteoblastoma occurring in long bones has a distinctive predilection for the metaphysis and the diaphysis. Epiphyseal location is rare. Although variation in histologic patterns is a well-known feature of this tumor, xanthomatous stromal reaction has not yet been described. We report a case of a 34-year-old man who developed an osteoblastoma primarily located in the epiphysis of his left tibia with extension into the metaphysis. The striking histologic features included a prominent xanthoma-like stroma consisting of foamy histiocytes in addition to focal areas with classical configuration of an osteoblastoma. The significance of this finding is discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
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