Cases reported "Osteochondritis"

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1/30. The changed preliminary report: a repeatedly missed paediatric tibial tumour.

    This report describes a malpractice case involving a delayed diagnosis of a malignant bone tumour in the proximal tibia in a 10-year-old child. This was caused by a combination of factors. The final report on the first examination failed to reach the patient files, and two subsequent X-ray exams failed to diagnose the tumour, due to misinterpretation in one and obscuring plaster of paris in the other.
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keywords = tibia
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2/30. Spectrum of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome includes micromelic chondrodysplasia, kyphomelic dysplasia, and Burton disease.

    Follow-up and re-evaluation of four patients originally described as examples of severe infantile "micromelic chondrodysplasia" resembling Kniest disease, "kyphomelic dysplasia," and "Burton skeletal dysplasia" revealed the diagnosis of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS, myotonic chondrodysplasia) in all of them. SJS may be suspected in neonates with Kniest-like chondrodysplasia, congenital bowing of shortened femora and tibiae, and facial manifestations consisting of a small mouth, micrognathia, and possibly pursed lips. The disorder must be differentiated from the Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome, a genetically distinct myotonic chondrodysplasia with similar clinical but different skeletal changes and an unfavorable early prognosis. The demise of "kyphomelic dysplasia" as a nosological entity reemphasizes the symptomatic nature of congenital bowing of the long bones.
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keywords = tibia
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3/30. Multiple osteochondroses of bilateral knee joints.

    We experienced a patient with a combination of multiple osteochondroses: Blount's disease, bipartite patella, and Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease in the left knee, and a combination of bipartite patella and Osgood-Schlatter disease in the right knee. The patient was a healthy, active 12-year-old boy with bilateral knee pain. He had been diagnosed with Blount's disease of the left tibia at 2 years of age, and had been treated with open wedge osteotomy. He was diagnosed with bilateral bipartite patellae at the age of 9 years, and was diagnosed with Osgood-Schlatter disease in the right knee and Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease in the left knee at 10 years of age. The second growth spurt was observed during this period. At 11 years of age, he was diagnosed with an osteochondral fracture of the left lateral femoral condyle and was observed without surgery. This patient showed the sequential appearance of an ossification disorder, probably due to the abnormal response of enchondral ossification to mechanical stress. Overuse in this growth period may have played a role in the development of these osteochondroses. The osteochondral fracture was probably caused by a disruption at one of the weakest parts of the developing skeleton, between the ossification center and the overlying cartilage in the background of an ossification disorder.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
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4/30. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    One patient with osteomyelitis of the anterior tibial tubercle and a second patient with arteriovenous malformation of the anterior tibial tubercle were originally misdiagnosed as having Osgood-Schlatter disease. These patients demonstrate pitfalls in the diagnosis of Osgood-Schlatter disease.
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keywords = tibia
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5/30. Blount's disease: a lesser known cause of bowlegs mandating early differentiation from physiological bowing.

    We present a 16-month-old child, with progressively increasing bowing of legs, having a normal serum calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase level; lower limb radiographs revealed bilateral medial tibial metaphyseal beaking. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of Blount's disease (infantile tibia vara) was made and an orthotic management program was instituted for the child.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = tibia
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6/30. rehabilitation of avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity following Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    A sixteen-year-old boy suffered from sharp pain in the knee during a jump while playing basketball. He had a positive history of Osgood Schlatter disease. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated an avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity Type III according to the classification of Watson-Jones. rehabilitation after avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity is an important consideration for this relatively uncommon adolescent injury. In such avulsion fractures, landing on the ground with the knee fully extended after a jump is the most likely cause. This case report reviews the rehabilitation program, and selected functional outcome measures after rehabilitation are reported. The patient returned to sporting activity after 12 months.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = tibia
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7/30. One-step treatment for evolved Blount's disease: four cases and review of the literature.

    In infantile tibia vara, the presence of superomedial bridge and sloped plateau requires several problems to be addressed: correction of varus deformity and internal tibial torsion, prevention of recurrences, restoration of normal joint congruity, and prevention and correction of limb length discrepancy. Four patients were treated as follows: percutaneous epiphysiodesis of the superolateral tibia and proximal fibula, elevation osteotomy of the medial tibial plateau, osteotomy of the fibula, and dome-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy of the tibia, followed by progressive lengthening. Osteosynthesis was achieved by an Ilizarov frame (average 6 months). Latest follow-up (average 6 years 10 months) showed that all patients were satisfied, with normal limb length and alignment and correct articular surface congruence. Correction of limb alignment, restoration of joint surface congruity, prevention of recurrence, and treatment of limb length discrepancy are all dealt with in the same procedure.
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keywords = tibia
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8/30. Type III fracture of the tibial tubercle with avulsion of the tibialis anterior muscle in the adolescent male athlete.

    INTRODUCTION: Type III fracture of the tibial tubercle by Watson-Jones, or type IIIa injury according to John Ogden's classification has been well described and its management is now well codified in standard orthopaedic textbooks. MATERIALS AND methods: The authors present a case of type III fracture of the tibial tubercle associated with an avulsion of the tibialis anterior muscle. RESULTS: We demonstrated the effectiveness of bioabsorbable material for fixing the fracture preventing the need for removal of metalware, and that the anterior tibialis muscle had been stripped by the injury. CONCLUSION: A displaced type III fracture of the tibial tubercle may have an associated with avulsion of the tibialis anterior muscle, particularly in adolescent athletes. Prompt recognition and appropriate surgical treatment can give an excellent outcome.
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ranking = 2.8
keywords = tibia
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9/30. Correction of genu recurvatum secondary to Osgood-Schlatter disease: a case report.

    Complications secondary to Osgood-Schlatter disease are rare, and there have been few reports on their treatment. Partial growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis as a result of Osgood-Schlatter disease has been infrequently described. Genu recurvatum from partial physeal arrest can cause cosmetic deformity, instability, pain, and weakness. We report a case of genu recurvatum secondary to Osgood-Schlatter disease treated successfully with proximal tibial osteotomy and distraction with a Taylor spatial frame.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = tibia
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10/30. tibia recurvatum as a complication of Osgood-Schlatter's disease: a report of two cases.

    Premature fusion of the anterior part of the upper tibial epiphyseal plate is a rare complication of Osgood-Schlatter's disease. The resulting deformity is both unsightly and difficult to treat. We report two further cases and highlight the need for regular screening for this rare complication of a common disease.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
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